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Ethics and Professionalism presentation for the trainers

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  • Addis Ababa University College of Education and Behavioral Studies Post Graduate Program Program: Managements of professional Vocational Education Business Education Unit Course: Pedagogical Science in Higher Education Subject Area Methods Course: Numbers CTPD 601 Individual Assignment: ON Lesson plan preparation and teaching material in ENTOTO Polytechnic College in Managements of Business Department for level V students Prepared by: Berhanu Tadesse GSE/0514/11 Submitted to: Instructors Associate Professor Girma Zewede August, 2013 Addis Ababa
  • Acknowledgements I would like to express my deepest appreciation. I take the privilege of express my esteem and profound sense of gratitude to Instructors Girma Zewede Associate Professor which offer this opportunity course of pedagogical sciences to prepare lesson plan in the Subject Area Methods the purpose of the assignment is designed to enrich and evaluate graduate students in business education (MPVBE). course the student managements not After only of professional the vocational accomplishment preparing as a paper of this but also presenting in the class we are obliged to properly performing in future work place. objectives of assignment helps the students to increase their potentials in terms of well prepare course lesson plan that’ll effective, efficient, enable for the future (make me) qualities and being concerned for proper planning of course lesson and course outline development as well as the steps and fulfilment of course lesson, outline and enthusiastic presentation . The individual assignment embraces a lot things.
  • Table of content   Introduction………………………………………………………………………………….............1 Basic Course Information………………………………….............................1  How and What Students Learn……………………………………………...…2  Course Participation and Evaluation Guidelines………………….…..…2 1. Development of Business (5 days)………………………………….….…3 2. Feasibility and Business Planning (3 days)………………………….………….............................3 3.Market Analysis (5 days)…………………………..…..………………………….…..………….................…..…3 4. What is E-commerce? (10 days)……………………………..………………....……….………………….....…….3 5. Legal Environment (3 days)……………………………………………….…………….………………….....………..3 6. What is marketing (5 days)……………………………………….…..…………..…………..…….….…………..…4 7.Selecting the Product…………………………………………………………………….……..……….…..…...……....4 8. Pricing the Product……………………………………………………..………………..………………………....……..4 9.Customer Services……………………………………………………………..……………..……..……………..…….….4 10. Promoting the Product…………………………………………………………….………..…………………..….……4 11. Delivering the Product…………………………………………………………………………..……..........………4 12.Career Development………………………………………………………………..…………………….……...……….4 Entoto polytechnic Management………………..…..……...….…5 college DEPARTMENT of BUSINESS COURSE OUTLINE AND TIMEFRAME……………………………………………………………..…..……….……..5 . Mode of Assessment…………………………………………………………………………………………….……………….…7 Entoto polytechnic college DEPARTMENT of BUSINESS Management……………………………………….8 OUTLINE OF INSTRUCTION: ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..9 REQUIRED TEXTBOOK AND MATERIALS: …………………………………………………………………………………..10 ‘Business Ethics and Responsibility’………………………………………………………………11 Corporate Social
  • NOTE ON MAKE UP TEST:…………………………………………………………………………………………………….…..12 Business Ethics and Corporate 3660)…………………….................13 Social Responsibility (AP/ADMS Course Outline…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……18 Student Assignments Grading:…………………………………………………………………………………...………19 and 1) Mid-Term (40%)……………………………………………………………………………………………………….…...…….19 2) Final Case Analysis Assignment (60%) ………………………………………………………………….….….........19 3) Class Participation ……………………………………………………………………………………………….……..………19 Bibliography………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……......19 Entoto polytechnic VOCATIONAL college DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT OF EDUCATION…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….20 34. I Course Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………..…...21 35. Course Objectives:…………………………………………………………………………………………………..…...21 II Cases in Management………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…22 Purposes of Cases …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….….…23 Structuring Case Analyses ……………………………………………………………………………………………….…..….23 Step One…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…..…24 Step Two:……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..….24 Step Three………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…..….25 Step Four:………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..….…..25 Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………....26 Reference……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..….27 Appendix
  • Introduction Lesson planning means making decisions in advance about what to teach, how to teach and the time assignment of every teaching procedure. Teaching plan is necessary for both novice and experienced teachers. Although preparation does not guarantee successful lessons, walking into a classroom unprepared is often the beginning of a disastrous lesson. Although the main teaching contents may be the same, the students, the time and the mood are all different. Lesson stricture: the stricture of a lesson can vary considerably depending on the subject matter, the age and ability of the learners, the policies of the school, the beliefs, preferred teaching styles, and strategies of the teacher, the time, space, and material resources available, and any requirements laid down by local or national government. This entry discusses the ways in which lessons may be structured and the factors influencing their shape and direction. A Framework for Developing Lesson Plans Objectives: By the end of the session the student will be able to: Explain the process of lesson planning, prepare a lesson plan as per the text book, Demonstrate their understanding of the skills enhanced through the use of the lesson plans. Example, on business communication course objectives: understanding the importance and the difference of Business Communication, To increase, Listening, Speaking, Writing ability effectiveness in business communication. Basic Communication Model Speaker-encoding-message decoding -listener in successfull communication sent =received Purpose of a lesson plan: To, structure the lesson, organize its contents/materials, determine method of its delivery, assess students’ learning, and evaluate its application/effectiveness. 3 V of Communication, Verbal: What you say:the message, Vocal: How you say: music of your voice, Visual: How you seem&who are you, Most powerful element of communication is:Visual! Give importance to visual self, as much as the knowledge and experience.
  • Common Problem Areas, Sending: Lack of gestures, tone of voice, ambigious words!: Convey the importance of the message. Environment: Noise.Physical obstacles, inadequency of the channels, Receiving: Misinterpretion of any word or behaviour, perceptual filter which reflect all our past experinces and learning Problems in Sending, using technical words for communication to nontechnical people, forgetting that the visual and vocal elements are the most important, words less. Ignoring the situation, expectencies and interests of the listener according to their expertise. Noise in the environment, Noise creates distortions of the message and prevents it from being understoood the way was intended, Noises may be ringing telephones, honking horns, messy, chaotic surroundings etc. Time, inapropriate time may be an obstacle to give message clearly.Friday afternoon is not proper for a heavy meeting. Perception Problems, Listeners ability to understand. Lack of attention, inattentive or bored listeners, Emotional state, stress, fear, anxiety, anger, Financial pressures, Prejudgements, Be sure that the receiver is “on” The importance &difference of business communication, Time is money&time has a cost, Time is limited with project D/L,workhours, Businesspeople are not our family or friends, Business is not a game or joke but serious, It is a halfdiplomatic environment, We may need any person in our career path with the nice memories about us. Business Comm. must be, brief, Well-designed, precise, specific, Short, Net&clear, Understandable&comprehensive Four Personal Types, Beside necessity of being briefly and precise, There are different types of people in businessworld. They seem different, behave different They expect to be communicated differently, Described by Carl Jung in 1920. The Relater I, Relaters are supporting and indirect. They are the most people-oriented of all 4, Having close, friendly, personal relations with others is one of the their most important objectives, and dislike conflict. Have good counselling skills and supportive, Excellent listenners and like good listeners The Relater II, Concerned with stability, Think logically, Want documentation and facts, Need personal involvement, Take action
  • and make decisions slowly, Need to know step by step sequence, Avoid risks and changes The Relater III, Work slowly with others, Try to accomodate others, Want tranquility and peace, Seek security and belongingness, Enjoy teamwork, Want to know they are appreciated The Relater IV, Have strong networks of people like them, Unassertive, warm, reliable, soft-hearted, Compliant, slow in taking action, avoid risk, Good trust builders, good team players, Thet are irritated by pushy, agressive people.Ideal occupations are counselling,teaching, social work, nursing, human resources, The Relater V, Primary strenghts of Relaters are caring for and loving others, They like others to be friendly, courteous, genuine, responsible and sensitive, For more balance need to learn to say “no” , to be more task-oriented and less sensetive for others, be willing to reach from comfort zone to set goals and to delegate it to others. The Four Style in Business Life, The Socializers like otherpeople to be risk-takers and act quickly, and decisively, The Directors like others to be decisive, efficient, receptive and intelligent, The Thinkers like others to be credible, professional, sincere and courteous, The Relaters like others to be courteous and friendly with sharing responsibilities The Four Style in Social Life, The Socializers like others to be unhibited, spontaneous and entertaining, The Directors like others to be assertive, clever and has sense of humour, The Thinker like others to be pleasant and sincere, The Relaters like others to be with real personalities and friendly, The Four Style At Glance, Relater, Relationship-oriented, Moves, act and speaks slowly, Wants tranquility peace, Enjoys teamwork, Good counselling skills, SocializerRelationship-oriented, Moves, acts, speak quickly, Risk- taker, Wants excitement &change, Enjoy spotlight, Good persuasive skills The Four Style At Glance, Thinker, Task-oriented, Moves, acts and speaks slowly, Wants to be accurate, Enjoys solitary, intellectual work, Cautious decision-makers, Good problemsolving skills Director, Task-oriented, Moves, acts and speaks quickly, Wants to be in charge, Gets results through others, Makes decisions quickly, Good administrative skill, Adapting Yourself I If you are a Director Lower your emphasis on Control of other people
  • Develop and demonstrate more Supportive skills and actions such as listening, questioning, and positive reinforcement. Adapting Yourself II If you are a Socializer Lower your emphasis on Need for approval from other people or groups, Directive skills and actions such as self-assertion, conflictresolution, negotiations. Adapting Yourself III If you are a Relater Lower your emphasis on Resistance to try new or different opportunities Develop and demonstrate more,Directive skills and actions such as negotiation and divergent think Adapting Yourself IV If you are a Thinker Lower your emphasis on Unnecessary perfectionism and the tendency to focus on weakness, Supportive skills and actions such as emphatic listening, positive reinforcement of others, involvement with others with complementary strengths The Six Step Lesson Plan Step 1 Goal and Objectives: What are the essential questions that will be covered in this lesson? What are the skills or knowledge conveyed? What are the inferences drawn from facts? Refer to your Unit backward design and add the specific goals and objectives for this lesson Step 2 Motivations: Set the Stage: The Motivation activities will provide a necessary plan toward a basic understanding of the issues involved in lesson plan. Before beginning a unit of material, ascertain what the student knows about the subject matter to be covered. This should be done in a non-graded, nonjudgmental, non-threatening manner. After determining what the student knows, introduce the major concepts that will be covered. Step 3 The Presentation: Presentation activities are designed to further enhance understanding. In addition to lecturing, the teacher contributes by utilizing manipulative, visuals, graphic organizers, and various modes of interaction between students. In addition to reading the text and listening to the teacher's lecture, the student takes responsibility for his learning by participating in group-work and sharing his understanding with others. Step 4 Application: Application activities will lead the students to appreciate the overall themes and ideas in lesson. In order to create further understanding, the student must go beyond rote memorization and demonstrate real-world application of the newly-learned information. This process requires "higherlevel critical-thinking skills" which result in ideas generated
  • by the student rather than ideas presented by the teacher or by the text. Step 5 Evaluation: Good instruction includes checking for student learning. This can be informal--questions that ask students to tell you what they know about the subject now--or formal--tests, worksheets, project presentations, oral reporting, etc. Step 6 Closure: This gives students the opportunity to reflect on what they have learned, which is important for retention. Summarize what has been learned. Relate it to previous learning. Tell them what they will learn next. Give homework assignments. Getting Students Motivated: In the first stage of the lesson, students' prior knowledge about a concept is probed. Typical into activities include: Review what they already know, The use of content-related visuals, Reaction journals, Vocabulary previews. Free association or visualization exercises, The end goal of this stage is for students to gain an entree into the topic, recognize the depth of their own prior knowledge, and be better prepared for the new content materials they are about to encounter. More Set Up, Do you need to build more project work? Do you need to more vocabulary? Should you stimulate curiosity or empathy? Is there some background information you can give about the ideas or people in the reading? Should you talk through the article in advance and overview or highlight key concepts? Can you relate material from previous assignments to the new material? Presentation & more….In the second step, students encounter the new content, relating it to their discussions of the concepts during the set up stage. This may entail expanding their knowledge base with new facts, ideas, or opinions. Activities that are typically found in this lesson stage include: Demonstrations, Project work vocabulary expansion, Examples & samples, text completion exercises, information gap tasks (such as jigsaw reading). The end goal of this stage is for students to practice new skills while demonstrating their comprehension of the basic concepts. Ask yourself the question: How will your presentation help your students experience and interpret the material? Relate story/text to personal experiences, Record questions to discuss with the group (individual or groups/teams
  • can create questions), Record examples of special or pleasing uses of language, imagery, or character/story development, Dramatization, Visualization, Illustrations, Discussion Keys to Application: In the final stage of the framework, students further demonstrate their comprehension by creatively applying their new knowledge. Such application may take several forms: Application of the knowledge to personal experience, to an example, to a real life problem, The end goal of this stage is for students to demonstrate both conceptual and skill mastery, and to provide a forum for practice. Can they share any new insights or thoughts they’ve had about the material? (Individual or group/team) Can students work in groups or teams to think beyond the material, and take further actions? (Any applications for new knowledge in the class environment, and/or in the school or community?)Are there extra credit opportunities to offer as enrichment that can meet individual interests or needs? Motivation Checklist, How are you introducing the material?, Is your anticipatory set engaging?, Does it create interest?, Have you posted an agenda for the day?, Have you stated the objectives of the lesson/unit?, Have you given an outline of the unit?, Have you stated how you will assess their learning? Presentation Checklist, Are you reviewing the previous lesson before you begin a new one, Have you repeated your expectations? , Are processes clearly outlined? , Are you reinforcing key ideas? Are students practicing new material as they learn it? , Do students understand common mistakes and misconceptions about the material?, Can learning in context with previous learning? Application students put new Checklist, Do students see the practical application of the material?, Have students completed homework that requires all the material?, Have students received feedback that guides them in clarifying their understanding?, students meet expectations on an assessment? Tools for Presenting, Can real objects and materials, manipulative (drawings, posters, brainstorming-clusters, graphs, tables, maps, props, multimedia presentations, storyboards, story maps), visuals (study-prints, text book-illustrations, overhead-projected prints, reproductions of paintings, and
  • documents), graphic organizers (matrices, Venn diagrams, and webs), opportunities for interaction between all individuals in the classroom (creating a skit and acting it out, co-operative learning, collaborative learning, and student-generated stories based on personal experiences) Summary, Where are they going? How will they get there? How will they know when they get there? Academic years 2013 Entoto polytechnic BUSINESS Management college DEPARTMENT of ADDIS ABABA TECHNICAL VOCATIONAL EDUCATION COURSE NUMBER: IM202 TITLE: BUSINESS PROCESSES DEPARTMENT / PROGRAM: Department INFORMATION MANAGEMENT …. In the department of Information Management Credit hours: - 3 SEMESTER AND SCHOOL YEAR: I, and II, INSTRUCTOR: +251911086066 Tadesse Berhanut Educational background: management number +251111140875 or Bachelor of art in Educational planning and E-mail- berhanutat@yahoo.com COURSE DESCRIPTION phone For Level V trainee
  • The course is designed for information management students who need to have an overview of generic business processes. They will learn how to describe, analyze, and redesign a business process through the use of tools and methodologies. COURSE OBJECTIVES (DESIRABLE outcomes) 1. Define the content, availability, and strategies to access information external to the organization; 2. Discuss how individuals make decisions and set and achieve goals; 3. Explain physical systems and work flow and how information systems relate to organizational systems; 4. Demonstrate specific classes of application systems including TPS and DSS; 5. Introduce the requirements for interoperability and systems integration; 6. Show students how to analyze organizational systems to determine how the systems might be improved; 7. Present organizational value and supply chain concepts, and distinguishing characteristics of traditional versus evolving organizations utilizing internet technologies; 8. Present and distinguish between types of e-commerce business relationship types including B2B, B2C, B2G, C2C, C2G, G2G; 9. Present and explain value and supply chain concepts and examples with respect to evolving e-commerce business relationships; 10. Present consumer issues that are frequently solved in e-commerce systems; and 11. Present concepts and specific examples of e-commerce functionality found in common business relationships COURSE OUTLINE AND TIMEFRAME TOPICS AND READINGS 1. Rationalization for Business Processes/ Business Drivers a. Streamlining business processes. b. Flattening organizational hierarchies. c. Introducing complex technologies at a rapid rate. 2. Business Cycles a. Revenue Cycle b. Expenditure Cycle c. Conversion Cycle d. Treasury Cycle 3. Transaction Systems (ERP, SCM) 4. Financial Management a. Accounts Receivable b. Accounts Payable c. General Ledger d. Fixed Assets e. Cash Management DATE 6 5 4 10
  • 5. Distribution and Logistics a. Procurement Management b. Sales Order Management c. Inventory Management 6. Manufacturing Systems a. Product Data Management b. Shop Floor Management c. Quality Management d. Advanced Planning Management e. Cost Accounting Management 7. Collaboration and Integration a. B2B b. B2E c. B2C d. B2G e. E-commerce options and issues 8. CRM a. Demand Chain Management b. Service, Support, Warranty Management c. Contact Center Management (Inbound/Outbound) 9. SRM a. Product Life Cycle Management b. Collaborative Product Design c. Product Data Management d. Co-managed Inventory, Billing, Purchasing e. Supplier Compliance 10. Sample Business Process Applications (Oracle Apps, JD Edwards, PeopleSoft, SAP, Siebel, eNGAS . Mode of Assessment, Group Presentation = 25% assessment - I = 10%, Project work - II = 25% 5 10 5 5 5 Practical Final exam = 40% REQUIRED READINGS Adel, E.K, and Oscar E.K (1973). Social Marketing, vol. 37, july,pp 1-7 Ohandike, Patrick. O (1998). Development in Africa: A Social Economical and demographic perspective. RIPS, Logan.pp. United nation(2004) population division Development of Economic and social affairs,WORLD CONTRACEPTIVE USE SUGGESTED READINGS EBooks , COURSE REQUIREMENTS, Academic years 2013 CONSULTATION HOURS
  • Entoto polytechnic COLLEG DEPARTMENT of BUSINESS Management DEPARTMENT of BUSINESS Management ADDIS ABABA TECHNICAL VOCATIONAL EDUCATION COURSE NUMBER: BUS 205 TITLE: BUSINESS PROCESSES BUS 240: June 2013 BUSINESS ETHICS COURSE DESCRIPTION: Prerequisite: ENG 090 and RED 090 or DRE 098; or satisfactory score on placement test Co requisite: None This course introduces contemporary and controversial ethical issues facing the business community. Topics include moral reasoning, moral dilemmas, law and morality, equity, justice and fairness, ethical standards, and moral development. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of their moral responsibilities and obligations as members of the workforce and society. Course Hours per Week: Class, 3. Semester Hours Credit, 3. LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the completion of the course requirements, the student will be able to: a. Define business ethics. b. Describe the evolution of business ethics. c. Describe major ethical perspectives. d. Understand and apply an ethical decision-making framework. e. Understand social responsibility from several dimensions. f. Understand how the organization influences ethical decision-making. g. Examine how significant others influence ethical decision-making. h. Examine opportunity and conflict. i. Develop an effective ethics program. j. Understand international business ethics. OUTLINE OF INSTRUCTION: the following are the topic we are going to cover the entire lesson, I. An Overview of Business Ethics
  • A. B. C. D. E. Business Ethics Defined Social Responsibility and Business Ethics The Development of Business Ethics Why study Business Ethics? Framework for Studying Business Ethics II. Ethical issues in Business A. Foundation of Ethical Conflict B. Classifications of Ethical Issues C. Ethical Issues Related to Participants and Functional Areas of Business D. Recognizing an Ethical Issue III. Applying Moral Philosophies to Business Ethics A. Moral Philosophy Defined B. Moral Philosophy Perspective IV. Social Responsibility A. The Economic Dimension B. The legal Dimension C. The Ethical Dimension D. The Philanthropic Dimension V. An Ethical Decision-Making Framework A. Ethical Issue Intensity B. Individual Factors: Stages of Cognitive Moral Development C. Corporate Culture D. Significant others E. Opportunity F. Business Ethics Evaluations and Intentions G. Using the Ethical Decision-Making Framework to Improve Ethical Decisions VI. How the Organization Influences Ethical Decision Making A. Organizational Structure and Business Ethics B. The role of Corporate Culture in Ethical Decision-Making C. Group Dimensions of Organizational Structure and Culture D. Implications of Organizational Relationships for Ethical Decisions VII. The Influence of Significant Others in the Organization A. Interpersonal Relationships in organizations B. Organizational Pressures and Significant Others C. Leadership D. Significant others and Ethical Behavior in Business VIII. The Role of Opportunity and Conflict A. Opportunity B. Conflict
  • IX. Development of an Effective Ethics Program A. An Effective Ethical Compliance Program B. Codes of Ethics and Compliance Standards C. High-Level Manager’s Responsibility for Ethical Compliance Programs and the Delegation of Authority D. Effective Communication of Ethical Standards E. Establishing Systems to Monitor, Audit, and Enforce Ethical Standards F. Continuous Improvement of the Ethical Compliance Program G. The Influence of Personal Values in Business Ethics Programs H. The Ethical Compliance Audit X. A. B. C. D. E. F. International Business Ethics Ethical Perceptions and International Business Culture as a Factor in Business Adapting Ethical Systems to a Global Framework: Cultural Relativism The Multinational Corporation A Universal Set of Ethics Ethical Issues around the Globe REQUIRED TEXTBOOK AND MATERIALS: The textbook and other instructional materials will be determined by the instructor to insure that current and relevant concepts and theories are present. STATEMENT FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: Students who require academic accommodations due to any physical, psychological, or learning disability are encouraged to request assistance from a disability services counselor within the first two weeks of class. Likewise, students who potentially require emergency medical attention due to any chronic health condition are encouraged to disclose this information to a disability services counselor within the first two weeks of class. Consultation hour week days at 8am to 10am in instructor office Assessment, Group Presentation = 25%, Practical assessment - I BUS = 10%Project 240: June 2013 work - II = 25%, Final exam = 40%
  • ‘Business Ethics and Responsibility’ (AP/ADMS 3660) year 2011 Corporate Entoto polytechnic college DEPARTMENT MANAGEMENT OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION MODULE TITLE: OF Social BUSINESS Business and Society: Ethics and Stakeholder Management Course Director: Berhanu Tadesse Office: Bld. 2 fl. No.213 Phone: E-mail: +251911086066 berhanutat@yahoo.com Required Text: Business and Society: Ethics and Stakeholder Management, Karakowsky, L., Carroll, A.B., and Buchholtz, A.K., First Canadian Edition (2005), Toronto, Ontario: ITP Nelson Publisher. Ethiopian government (MoE) proclamation on TVET (391/2004) etc. There may also be supplemental readings posted on the course website throughout the semester. Important Dates: august 23th: Last date to enroll in Term SU courses without instructor’s permission; receiving a July 5th: Last date to drop the course without grade. MID-TERM EXAM: Sunday, June 12th (12:00-3:00 pm); Room TBA MAKE UP TEST: Sunday, June 19th (12:00-3:00 pm); Room TBA
  • NOTE ON MAKE UP TEST: This test is ONLY for students who missed the mid-term for an urgent and valid reason. Students must advise me by email of having missed the mid-term exam and the reasons for missing the mid-term by 4:00 pm on Monday, June 13th. Failure to inform me by 4:00 pm on Monday, June 13th could result in permission not being given to write the make-up mid-term leading to a grade of 0 for the mid-term. Students must also submit to the School of Administrative Studies office (room 282 Atkinson) by 4:00 pm on Thursday, June 16th a completed and original “Attending Physician’s Statement” (http://www.yorku.ca/laps/council/students/documents/APS.pdf) which must include the name and phone number of a contact person who can verify the reason for absence. Students who fail to take either the mid-term or the make-up mid-term test will receive a grade of 0 on the mid-term test, with no exceptions (including documented medical/health related absences). Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 3660) Course Teacher Guide and session summary (AP/ADMS Course Description: This course introduces students to the relevance and importance of ethics and social responsibility in business. Important learning objectives are to increase students’ awareness and understanding of ethical issues in business, and to provide students with useful conceptual tools to guide analysis and decisions. The ultimate intent of the course is to leave students better equipped to identify, think critically about, and resolve ethical issues that are encountered in one’s working life at the individual, organizational, and societal levels. Some of the conceptual tools and frameworks to be discussed throughout the course include:     Ethics versus the Law Moral Responsibility Moral Theory, Reasoning, and Development Ethical Decision-Making
  •  Corporate Social Responsibility Theory The course will apply these conceptual tools and frameworks to the treatment by business of their various stakeholder groups including: shareholders; employees; consumers; suppliers, the natural environment, communities, and governments. The course concludes with a discussion of how companies can better establish ethical corporate cultures (e.g., compliance and ethics programs). Learning Objectives: a. To enhance awareness and increase understanding of the nature of business ethics in the Canadian as well as global business environment. b. To examine the ethical implications of business practices from a stakeholder perspective. c. To increase awareness of the challenges of business social responsibility. d. To develop critical thinking skills via the application of concepts and theories to business cases. Class Schedule Date Topic Readings/Cases Session 1 Week of May 2nd Introduction to Business Ethics and Social Responsibility  Readings: 1  Video Parable Sadhu   What is business ethics? Chapter of Case: the What is social responsibility?  Ethics versus the law Session Summary: The goal of the introductory session is to familiarize students with the subjects of business ethics and corporate social responsibility. In order to do this, basic definitions of key concepts are provided and discussed, as well as myths regarding business ethics debunked. For example, is ‘ethics’ the same thing as the law, religion, and etiquette? Is business ethics an oxymoron? Is business ethics important? If so, how? The session concludes with the ‘Parable of the Sadhu’ case and a discussion how it might relate to a typical business ethics dilemma. In this case, an investment
  • banker must decide whether to save a sadhu (i.e., an Indian holy man) or continue with his life-long dream of climbing in the Himalayan mountains. Session 2 Week of May 9th Ethical Frameworks  Moral responsibility   Readings: Chapters 6 & 7 Moral development  Moral theory Session Summary: During this session, the basic tools are provided for engaging in ethical analysis and decision making. A number of topics are covered such as the stages of moral development, moral responsibility, and the moral reasoning process. The question of who is or should be a stakeholder is discussed. The session then begins to introduce several of the moral standards one can use to engage in ethical decision-making, which forms the central building block or tool of analysis for the course. The moral standards initially covered will include: core values; relativism; and egoism. Session 3  Readings: Chapters Ethical Frameworks 6 & 7  Moral reasoning Week of  Case 8: IBM and process May 16th The Final  Moral theory Solution Session Summary: This session continues to outline the remaining key moral standards one can use for ethical decision making, including: utilitarianism; Kantianism; moral rights; and justice/fairness. The session concludes with a discussion of the ‘IBM and the Final Solution’ case, involving IBM’s sale of equipment used by the Nazis during WWII. Students will be asked to apply all of the moral standards in analyzing the case and determining whether the firm acted in an ethical manner.
  • Session 4 Week of May 23rd Corporate Social Responsibility  Social responsibility theory   Readings: Chapters 2 & 3  Additional Handout (on course website): Milton Friedman’s “The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits” Stakeholder theory  Case 16: The Body Shop International Session Summary: This session moves the discussion from moral standards to the debate over the proper extent of a business firm’s obligations towards society. The preliminary issue asked is as follows: Are firms even capable of being held morally responsible, or only their agents? Following this question, the key issue to be debated follows: Is business merely obligated to maximize profit for its shareholders while obeying the law, or are there additional ethical and/or philanthropic obligations as well, as reflected by The Body Shop? By the end of the session students should not only understand CSR theory, but formulate their own position on the CSR debate. Two cases help assess appropriate CSR. In the first case, the public drug firm Merck must decide whether to develop a drug that can cure millions of people of river blindness, even when prospective customers are too poor to pay for the medicine. In the second (video) case, CEO Aaron Feuerstein must decide whether to relocate his textile firm’s factories following a devastating fire. Session 5 Week 30th of May  Employees: Obligations     Greed conflicts interest and of Insider trading Theft and fraud Whistle-blowing Readings: Chapter 15 (pp.479-493)  Case 1: Stewart  Case 5: The Whistle-blower at Canadian Marconi Martha
  • Session Summary: The following sessions involve more of a practical application of the previous frameworks initially discussed (i.e., moral standards and CSR theory) to a variety of topics, typically focusing on particular stakeholders. The first stakeholder group involves employees, and the challenge of behaving ethically in the workplace. We begin by discussing the notion of greed versus self-interest, and ask ‘Is greed good?’ We then refer to the topic of conflicts of interest including giving and receiving gifts and entertainment, insider trading, and theft and fraud. The Martha Stewart case examines the issue of possible insider trading. The session concludes with a debate over when it is permissible or even obligatory to blow the whistle on one’s colleagues or employer due to legal or ethical misconduct, and includes an examination of ‘The Whistle-blower at Canadian Marconi’ case.
  • Session 6 Mid-Term Exam Sunday June 12th 12:00-3:00 pm Session 7 Employees: Rights Week of  June 20th  Discrimination and harassment  Readings: Chapters 16, & 17  Case 4: Nova Scotia’s Westray Mine Tragedy Privacy  Health and safety Session Summary: This session deals with the rights of employees from an ethical perspective. The issue of discrimination and sexual harassment is discussed, as well as the right to health and safety of employees. In terms of safety, we examine the ‘Nova Scotia’s Westray Mine Tragedy’ case, and ask who should be held accountable. The right to privacy of employees versus the rights of employers to monitor their employees is also discussed. Session 8 Week of June 27th Consumers: Protection  Readings: 12   Case Tacos Consumer protection 19: Chapter Toxic  Product recalls Session Summary: This session moves the discussion to the obligation firms have towards their customers or clients. Various positions on manufacturer’s obligations are presented, including the contract view (i.e., buyer beware), due care (i.e., seller take care), or social cost (i.e., seller beware). The case ‘Toxic Tacos’ asks the question whether genetically modified foods should be sold before they are proven to be safe. Session 9 Week of July 4th Consumers: Marketing  Marketing ethics  Pricing, quality,   Readings: 11 Chapter Case 10: Child Sponsorship and the ‘Future of Basketball’
  • labeling  Case 11: Assurance Magnum of Quebec Session Summary: The ethical issues involved in marketing products and services to consumers are discussed. Special attention to marketing to vulnerable groups such as children, or ethical concerns due to the marketing of certain products (e.g., cigarettes or alcohol), are covered. The case ‘Child Sponsorship and the Future of Basketball’ explores whether it is appropriate for Reebok to sponsor a child at such an early age. The case ‘Assurance Magnum of Quebec’ explores ethical obligations when selling an insurance product.
  • Session 10 Week of July 11th Global Ethics   Bribery Repressive Regimes  Readings: 9  Business Case 3: Acres in Oakville and Bribery in Lesotho Chapter  Case 20: Nike Inc. Overseas Suppliers Session Summary: This session focuses on doing business abroad, when one’s home country’s legal or ethical standards may conflict with those where one is doing business. Students will be expected to develop their own personal position on the debate: When in Rome, should one ‘do as the Romans do’? Or should one do what one does at home?’ The Union Carbide in Bhopal India case will be discussed in relation to this issue. Several issues will be discussed as part of this debate including bribery (‘Acres in Oakville and Bribery in Lesotho’ case), doing business in countries with repressive regimes, and dealing with overseas suppliers (‘Nike Inc.’ case).  Session 11 Review Week of July 18th Posted Online on CASE July 18th ASSIGNMENT Due: Tuesday, August 2nd by 3:00 pm  No readings ANALYSIS Student Assignments and Grading: Assignment Grade Weight Due Date 1) Mid-Term Exam 40% Sunday, June 12th 2) Case Analysis 60% Assignment Posted online July 18th Due: Tuesday, August 2nd (by
  • 3:00 pm) TOTAL 100% 1) Mid-Term (40%) The mid-term exam will be closed-book and cover all of the material from the beginning of the course, including readings, cases, videos, and lecture material. The mid-term will consist of multiple choice, short answer, and short essay questions. The heavy focus of the mid-term will be on the material presented in the video lectures as well as the accompanying slides. 2) Final Case Analysis Assignment (60%) The major assignment will cover all of the material in the course. No additional materials beyond the course will be required. The assignment will involve the ethical analysis of a case as well as possibly a few short essay questions. Late assignments will be subject to a grade deduction of 5% for each 24 hour period for any reason. You will submit the assignment directly on the Moodle course website in Word format. Please follow the instructions that will be included with the final assignment carefully. Final assignments should only be emailed to me (schwartz@yorku.ca) if you are unable to submit the assignment on the Moodle course website (make sure to do so before the due date and time if this happens). 3) Class Participation While there is no formal class participation grade, you are still expected to contribute to online discussions as well as answer survey questions. The instructor reserves the right to verify the extent to which students have visited the Moodle course website in order to access the course material. Note, past experience suggests that students who fail to access the site and engage with the material (e.g., all of the video lectures and slides) tend to perform more poorly than those who do fully engage with the material. Before learning this course the trainee should fulfill the prerequisite courses are as follows be
  • Management courses including human resource, entrepreneurships, marketing management, store management and material managements know about business and among other courses conclusion What is a lesson? Originally, a lesson a piece of reading, from the Latin lectio. Today, however, reading is but one of a multitude of possible lesson components. The contemporary concept of lesson is very elastic. It can embrace exactly 40 minutes of time, devoted exclusively to the teaching of chemistry to 14 years old in a laboratory, signaled by the sounding of a bell at the beginning and end it might equally be a 1½ hours session, between the start of the school day and morning break, between the start of the school day and morning break, during which 7-years engage in a variety of activities in an open school, with no formal indication formal indication, other than a signal from the teacher, as to when it should begin or end. Writhing the material can be discussed by taking to account the three major stages, namely. Arranging the topics, preparing course outlines and writing the material. preparing course outline preparation puts some various types of course outline preparation observed in the above hence, preparing outlines once the topics to come under each of the modules/units/sections are identified and arranged, the writer is required to develop some outlines to determine what should come under each section and sub-sections. Developing good outline is not an easy matter. It requires adequate understanding of the field of study, the learner, the location of the particular course within the program of study and many more. Such outlines, if properly done, would help much in determining the breadth and depth of the material as well as in locating relevant resources. It is also very crucial to receive inputs from relevant persons. There are several ways by which material developers go about preparing outlines. Here are some steps which may be useful. i.e.     consider the trainees background, needs, etc, Review relevant literature about the area of study Prepare a draft out line. Conduct a group review and assessment of the draft outline,  Improve the draft outline incorporating any suggestions/amendments,  Review the second draft and finalize it.
  • Curriculum outline do vary in terms of the details involved. Where some outlines only focus on contents, others do include all the necessary items such as where to insert tasks, where to break and the like. This may depend on the nature of the material. Normally, an outline of a curriculum material is expected to clearly show the structure of the curriculum material to serve as a guide to material writers. And also we can use with the combination of the above outline is mandatory for the clarification of the subject for the student. Biblography African Press Organization (December, 18th 2008). Kenya / US$ 37 million AfDB Loan in Support of Technical, Industrial, Vocational and Entrepreneurship Training. Nairobi, Kenya unpublished Altinyelkien K, H. (2004) Technical and Vocational Training in Developing Countries, unpublished Atchoerena, D. Delluc, Vocational Online A. (2001) Revisiting Technical and study guide and readings Atchoarena,D. (1994). Policy and Planning for Vocational Education and Training. Paris UNESCO/IIEP. Kotler, P. and Zaltman, G. (1971). “social marketing: An Approach to planned social change,” Journal of marketing, Vol,35, July, pp3-12 Brown, B.L. (2001). Mentoring and Work-Based Learning. Trends and Issues Alert, 29. Eric Bank.Bambrick, J (1962) “developing workable policies.” In R. Finely Ed.) The Personnel Man and His Job. New York: American management
  • Association Inc. Castetter, W. (1981) The Personnel Function in Education Administration. third publishing ed. New York: McMillan Company Inc. Hunsacker, L.et al. (1980). The Art of Managing people. New York: Simon and Schuster Inc Clearing House on Adult, Career and Vocational Education. Doughert, C. (1989). The Cost Effectiveness of National Training Systems in Developing Countries. Washington. D.C.: The World Mondy, R.H and M.N Robert (1990). Human Resource Management. Boston: Atlyn and Bacon.Walton, J. (1999) Strategic Human Resource Limited Text: Development. Norlin, . M., Essex: & Learning and business plans: National studies. pearson Travis,T. (2008). E- and international case Lanham, Maryland: The Scarecrow Press Joni Rose, 2010 of reserved A. Education Inc. Career Minded Consulting Services. All rights