Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Foursquare - Why Checking-In is So Addictive
Foursquare - Why Checking-In is So Addictive
Foursquare - Why Checking-In is So Addictive
Foursquare - Why Checking-In is So Addictive
Foursquare - Why Checking-In is So Addictive
Foursquare - Why Checking-In is So Addictive
Foursquare - Why Checking-In is So Addictive
Foursquare - Why Checking-In is So Addictive
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Foursquare - Why Checking-In is So Addictive

713

Published on

Foursquare - Why Checking-In is So Addictive

Foursquare - Why Checking-In is So Addictive

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
713
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Why Checking-In is So Addictive<br />by Max Zamkow<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  • 2. Lets Examine…<br />How Foursquare gets new users to repeatedly open their app<br />We’ll look at the process by which a first time user is persuaded to open the app a second time…<br />
  • 3. User finds out about Foursquare<br />User connects friends to their Foursquare profile<br />User gets push notification from friend<br />User visits the AppStore and downloads app<br />User sees badges and points<br />User wants more badges and points<br />User opens app again<br />User opens Foursquare for the first time<br />User checks in<br />User must open app later to achieve their goal<br />User gets a badge and/or points <br />User sees someone else as mayor of somewhere important to them<br />User wants to be mayor<br />
  • 4. Now let’s look at the different types of behaviors that the new user goes through.<br />For this we’ll classify each behavior into one of the 15 behaviors in the Fogg Behavior Grid <br />(see http://behaviorgrid.org)<br />Legend:<br />Legend:<br />- Green Behavior<br />- Blue Behavior<br />- Spot Behavior<br />- Purple Behavior<br />- Span Behavior<br />- Action (not a behavior)<br />- Path Behavior<br />
  • 5. User finds out about Foursquare<br />User connects friends to their Foursquare profile<br />User gets push notification from a friend<br />User visits the AppStore and downloads app<br />User sees badges and points<br />User wants more badges and points<br />User opens app again<br />User opens Foursquare for the first time<br />User checks in<br />User must open app later to achieve their goal<br />User gets a badge and/or points <br />User sees someone else as mayor of somewhere important to them<br />User wants to be mayor<br />
  • 6. So the Route to the User Opening the App again is (on average)…<br />This is the key, motivating the first time user to want more<br />
  • 7. Looking just at the behaviors that influence the user to return to the app…<br />User gets a push notification from a friend<br />Cue<br />User wants to become a mayor<br />User opens app<br />User wants a new badge / more points<br />User checks in daily<br />Cycle<br />
  • 8. Synopsis<br />Foursquare’s trick is to influence new users to create purple span behaviors which then lead to the blue path cycle behavior of opening the app often.<br />Additionally they utilize blue spot cue behaviors to further increase the frequency of users opening the app, re-presenting them with the purple span behaviors which, as above, lead to the creation of the blue path cycle behavior.<br />

×