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EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
EoP: Designing for Place
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EoP: Designing for Place

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Elements of Permaculture, class two: Design methodologies, reading the landscape, mapping flows of energetic materials, slope, zone, sector, design elements & design functions. Also indoor plumbing, …

Elements of Permaculture, class two: Design methodologies, reading the landscape, mapping flows of energetic materials, slope, zone, sector, design elements & design functions. Also indoor plumbing, crabs, etc.

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  • 1. Elements of Permaculture
    • Designing for Place
    Ben Kessler Laughing Crow Permaculture
  • 2. Design Process I
    • 1. Observation
      • What is already here?
    • 2. Interpretation
      • What does it mean?
    • 3. Design
      • What can we do with it?
    • 4. Implementation
      • Do it!
    • 5. Assessment
      • Did it work?
  • 3. Humans are a Keystone Species
    • Like beavers and elephants, humans deform, reform, and transform their environment
    • “ There’s a learning curve in all phases of design. There’s an unlearning curve in how we relate to our habitat - cultural views of humans and nature as separate.”
    • – Connor Stedman
    • “ We must make treaties with the land - and keep them.” – Farrell Cunningham
    • As permaculture designers, we are building relationship with our role as major actors in the landscape.
  • 4. Castor canadensis
    • River
    Pond Wetland Meadow Forest Meadow
  • 5. Ethics
    • Earth Care
    • People Care
    • Distribute the Surplus
      • Yahatidom : “Being a part of the cause of its goodness.”
  • 6. Earth Care
    • Care of the earth means care of all living
    • and nonliving things: soils, species,
    • atmospheres, forests, micro-habitats,
    • waters, etc.
    • Rebuild nature’s capital.
    • “ I am not protecting the forest, I am a part of the forest protecting itself.” – John Seed
  • 7. People Care
    • Care of the earth also implies care of the
    • people so that our basic needs for food,
    • shelter, education, satisfying employment,
    • human contact, etc. are met.
    • Nurture the self, kin, and community- those who we can be responsible for directly.
  • 8. Distribute the Surplus
    • “ Fair Share”
    • After we have taken care of our basic needs
    • and designed our systems to the best of our ability,
    • we can extend our influence and energies to helping others
    • achieve that aim.
    • Consume appropriately.
    • Limit reproduction in some practical sense.
  • 9. Life Ethic
    • The permaculture system also has a basic Life Ethic , which recognizes the intrinsic worth of every living organism, human or otherwise.
    • Pan-species Personhood : Everybody’s somebody, and nobody’s more inherently important than anybody.
  • 10.
    • Person
    Person Person Person People Person People Densely populated Ariundle Woods, Scotland
  • 11. Panarchy
    • All systems affect all others.
  • 12. Design Process II
    • Observation
    Ethical Intention Natural Systems Thinking Assessment Pattern Integrates all for best Flow & Function Tools, Ideas & Systems Methods of Design Visioning
  • 13. Design Process III
    • Observation
    Sequence The Map Implementation Master Plan Investigation Assessment Analysis Conceptual Design (The Vision) History & Background Statement of Intent
  • 14. Guiding Design Principles
    • 1. Everything is connected to everything else
    • 2. Every Function is supported by many Elements
    • 3. Every Element should serve many Functions
    • 4. Independence through Interdependence
    • Element : Any component part of a system
    • Function : What the system is designed to do
    • Product : The Yield of an Element
  • 15. Stack Functions Assemble Elements to complement each other’s Functions spatially and temporally. Standard & Coppice Circle Garden
  • 16. Resources & Chaos
    • A Resource is any energy storage which assures Yield .
    • The Chaos/Disorder Principle : If Resources are added
    • beyond the capacity of the system to productively use them,
    • then that system becomes chaotic or disordered.
    • (after Eugene Odum)
    • Chaos or Disorder is the opposite of Harmony , as
    • Competition is the opposite of Cooperation . In disorder,
    • much useful energy is cancelled out by the use of opposing
    • energy, thus creating Entropy or ‘bound’ energy. This is
    • wasteful.
  • 17. Eutrophication
    • Too much of a good thing!
  • 18. Function & Failure
    • Functional Design:
    • Sustainable (at minimum); provides for its own needs
    • Has good, or surplus, Product Yield
    • Requires that:
    • Every Product used by some Element
    • Needs of every Element supplied by other Elements in the system
    • Failure Results in:
    • Pollution : Unused Product /over-abundant Resource
    • Work : Deficiency of Resources /lack of aid to one or more Elements
  • 19. Design Fail
    • This machine turns fresh water, valuable nutrients, and
    • organic material into Pollution .
    • For more information, visit http://weblife.org/humanure/default.html
    Utter Chaos!
  • 20. Slow the Flow!
    • - Catch & store materials at their highest energetic state
    • - Increase the number of energy uptake points (i.e. increase surface area)
    • - Slow the passage of materials from high to low energetic states
    • - Use only the amount of energy that can be productively
    • absorbed by the system
  • 21. Source to Sink
    • Throughput System Regenerative System
  • 22. Effective Design Goals
    • 1. Adaptability
    • 2. Optimize Relative Location
    • 3. Use Biological Resources
    • 4. Stack Functions
    • 5. Appeal to Senses; Beauty
    • 6. Physical Comfort
    • 7. Practicality
    • 8. Safety
    • 9. Maintenance
    • 10. Integrate Elements: Natural, Constructed, Social, Ethical
    • 11. Conserve Resources: Yours, Enviroment’s
  • 23. Methodologies of Design
    • Techniques : Concerned with How to do things
    • e.g. Organic Gardening
    • Strategies : Concerned with How and When to do things
    • e.g. Biodynamics
    • Design : Concerned with Patterning
    • e.g. Permaculture
  • 24. Approaches to Design
    • 1. Maps : “Where is everything?”
    • 2. Analysis of Elements : “How do these things connect?”
    • 3. Zone & Sector Planning : “Where do we put things?”
    • 4. Observation : “What’s going on here, anyway?”
    • 5. Experience : “What feels right for this place?”
  • 25. Maps
    • Use P.A. Yeoman’s Scale of Permanence to inform sequence of maps:
    • 1. Climate : Hardiness Zone, Temperature, Rainfall, Extreme Weather
    • 2. Land Shape : Hills, Valleys, Rivers, Flats
    • 3. Water Flow & Storage : Swales, Dams, Ponds
    • 4. Roads : Paths, Deer Trails, Highways
    • 5. Trees : Orchards, Forests, Woodlots
    • 6. Buildings : Homestead, Commerce Center, Police Station
    • 7. Subdivision of Land : Fences, Garden Beds, Neighborhoods, Fields
    • 8. Soil : Earthworks, Amended Areas, Topsoil Profile Zones
    • Remember: “The map is not the terrain…”
  • 26.
    • Parkside Development Stormwater Flow, Los Angeles, CA
    • courtesy of Scott Kleinrock
    Epworth Forest Garden courtesy of Ethan Roland & Conner Stedman
  • 27. Analysis of Elements
    • List the Yields , Needs , and intrinsic characteristics of each
    • Element .
    • Lists are made to try to supply (by some other Element in
    • the system) the Needs of any particular Element .
    • Experiment on paper, connecting and combining Elements
    • to achieve no Pollution and minimize Work .
    • Close the Loops!
  • 28. Yields & Needs
    • Tomato/Tomatl
    • Solanum lycopersicum
    • Yields Needs
    Full Sunlight, Water, NPK, Micronutrients, Warm Soil, Protection from Herbivores, Mycorrhizal Partners, Slightly Acidic Soil pH, Well-drained Soil, Structural Support, Love Delicious Fruit, Spatial Demarcation, Mulch, Dense Verdant Foliage, Pest Protection for Brassicas and Gooseberries, Companionship for Basil and Nettles
  • 29. Zone 0 : House Zone I : Annual Garden, Deck, Greenhouse Zone II : Barn, Orchard, Ponds Zone III : Pastures, Windbreaks, Zone IV : Woodlot Zone V : Wilderness Zones help us place elements on the site so they reduce Work, Resource use, and maintenance, boost Yields and diversity, and recycle Resources. Zone Planning
  • 30. Sector Analysis • Sun: Summer & Winter paths • Winds: Cold, Hot, Dusty, etc. • Fire • Wildlife Corridors • Views: Pleasant, Ugly, Privacy • Shade: Buildings, Vegetation • Landforms: Slope, Sinks, etc. • Traffic: Human, Cars, etc. • Pollution: Chemical, Noise, etc.
  • 31. Slope & Temperature
    • Cool Sink
    Warm Pocket Mid-Slope Wind-Chilled Summit Rising Thermals Adiabatic Winds Vegetation Buffers Changes in Temperature
  • 32. Slope & Water - Water flows downhill - Water collects in low, cool areas with poorly drained soil - Water is stored in the bodies of living organisms - Water is stored in the soil Keyline : Where the slope of the landscape changes.
  • 33. Thanks to
    • Andrew Jeeves
    • Bill Mollison
    • Conner Stedman
    • Scott Kleinrock
    • &
    • Tyrone LaFay
    • for words and pictures
    • Contact Information
    • [email_address]
    • laughingcrowpermaculture.wordpress.com

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