Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

2009 IBS - High Performance Masonry Walls

on

  • 2,827 views

Presentation for the 2009 International Builders Show by Mike Coulton, Director of Product Development & Marketing at Benjamin Obdyke.

Presentation for the 2009 International Builders Show by Mike Coulton, Director of Product Development & Marketing at Benjamin Obdyke.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,827
Views on SlideShare
2,822
Embed Views
5

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
24
Comments
0

1 Embed 5

http://www.slideshare.net 5

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    2009 IBS - High Performance Masonry Walls 2009 IBS - High Performance Masonry Walls Presentation Transcript

    • High Performance Residential Masonry Walls in the 21 st Century Presented by: Mike Coulton Director of Product Development Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • AGENDA
      • It’s about moisture management
      • Why now?
      • Case study
      • Solution options
      • Selecting the right solutions
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Introduction
      • Need to incorporate good moisture management solutions
        • Ward off problems – occupant health mold, rot, sustainability
        • Energy efficiency of wall
        • Code changes – compliance
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Introduction © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Introduction © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Introduction © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Introduction © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Why Now?
      • We’ve been building masonry walls for centuries - why water problems now?
        • Mass walls vs. veneer on wood framing
        • Insulation practices – Energy crisis #1 (1970s) and #2 (2000s)
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Why Now?
      • Brick, stucco, stone walls have always absorbed lots of moisture – very porous
      • Before tight envelopes (insulation and water/air resistive barriers):
        • Winter – dried inside to outside
        • Summer – dried outside to inside
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Why Now?
      • Tightened building envelopes are great for saving energy, but bad for “drying” walls out
      • OSB vs. planks or even plywood
      • Water-resistive (not water-proof) and air-resistive barriers
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • The Need
      • Preserving the life of exterior framing and sheathing – sustainability.
      • Reducing liability for callbacks, remediation, and litigation costs when moisture damage occurs.
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • The Need
      • Complying with growing code requirements:
        • IRC - Wall that “drains”
        • Water resistive barrier requirement
        • State code requirements (MN, OR?)
        • Canadian codes
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Code Changes / Requirements
      • 2006 IRC Section 703.1
        • “ The exterior wall envelope shall be designed and constructed in a manner that prevents the accumulation of water within the wall assembly by providing a water-resistant barrier behind the exterior veneer as required by Section 703.2, and a means of draining water that enters the assembly to the exterior .”
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
      • 2006 IRC Section 703.2
        • “ One layer of No. 15 asphalt felt, free from holes and breaks, complying with ASTM D 226 for Type I felt or other approved water-resistive barrier shall be applied over studs or sheathing of all exterior walls.”
      Code Changes / Requirements © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
      • 2005 NBC of Canada Section 9.27.2.2
        • “… exterior walls exposed to precipitation shall be protected against precipitation ingress by an exterior cladding assembly consisting of a first plane of protection and a second plane of protection incorporating a capillary break ...”
      Code Changes / Requirements © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
      • 2005 NBC of Canada Section 9.27.2.2 (cont.)
        • “… a cladding assembly is deemed to have a capillary break between the cladding and the backing assembly where …there is a drained and vented air space not less than 10mm deep behind the cladding, over the full height of the wall…”
      Code Changes / Requirements © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Case Study
      • Homes on Philadelphia “Main Line”
      • Built within last 10 years
      • Moisture Problems
      • Remediation
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Case Study © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Case Study © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Case Study © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Case Study © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Case Study © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Case Study © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Case Study
      • Cost to remediate $75,000 to $300,000+
      • Tear off cladding, WRB, sheathing, insulation, some framing
      • Do all this while occupied
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Case Study
      • Costs to prevent up-front
        • $1000 to $5000
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Brick Veneer
      • What can we learn from brick veneer?
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Brick Veneer © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Brick Veneer
      • Built with a space between cladding and sheathing
      • Built with drainage at bottom (need to keep clear)
      • Still uses WRB (one layer)
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Rainscreens
      • A technique for controlling rain entry in an exterior wall
      • Involves locating an air space wide enough for capillary break immediately behind the exterior cladding
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Rainscreens
      • When combined with openings at top and bottom, it creates a pressure equalized/moderated space to reduce forces leading to water entry
      • Water that does enter behind the cladding is not in direct contact with sheathing wall
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Rainscreens
      • The capillary break space – at least 3/16” – can prevent surfactants from damaging the water resistive barrier
      • Residual moisture is dried by air movement (ventilation drying)
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Rainscreens
      • Ventilation drying can also assist in removing moisture vapor from inside the building moving outward and from solar drive from wet claddings moving inward (remember those 2-way water resistive barriers)
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Rainscreens
      • Brick veneer construction
      • Strapping or furring strips
      • Void space technology (“drainage mats”, “ventilation mats”, “rolled rainscreens”) – 21 st century
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Rainscreens © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Rainscreens © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Rainscreens © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Rainscreens © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Rainscreens
      • The chief advantage of strapping is in material costs – furring strips are less expensive than manufactured rainscreen products
      • Installing these strips is labor-intensive and therefore strapping may ultimately be more costly than void space products
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Rainscreens
      • Strapping covers about 15% of the wall surface leading to trapped moisture
      • Void space products are applied continuously protecting the entire surface area of the wall and providing a level surface for masonry application
      • Combination products provide the rainscreen in same installation step as the housewrap, reducing labor
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Applications
      • How is this technology used in masonry walls?
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Applications – Brick Veneer
      • Natural rainscreen
      • Must keep weep system “open” and avoid clogging with mortar droppings
      • Used to pull 1x or 2x board on wires up through wall or pour in pea gravel.
      • 21 st century – void space products at bottom of walls
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Applications – Brick Veneer © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Applications – Stucco, Manufactured/Veneer Stone
      • Create a rainscreen wall with void-space rolled mats
        • Roll out like a WRB
        • Uniform thickness over wall
        • Creates capillary break to separate cladding from sheathing
        • Promotes drainage and drying
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Applications – Stucco, Manufactured/Veneer Stone © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Applications – Stucco, Manufactured/Veneer Stone © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Conclusions
      • Walls no longer dry by themselves
      • Heightened concern over moisture liability and changing codes
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Conclusions
      • Building science agrees that rainscreen wall is best wall system and NAHB recent white paper recognizes.
      • Learn from brick veneer - create a space between the cladding and the WRB/sheathing/framing
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
    • Conclusions
      • Advances in technology have broadened the range of solutions available to you to prevent problems
      • Upfront cost $1000 to $5000 vs. $75,000 to $300,000+ after the fact
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated
      • Thank you
      © 2008 Benjamin Obdyke Incorporated