Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
The Value of a Liberal Arts Education
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

The Value of a Liberal Arts Education

951
views

Published on

Have a passion for history? Love French literature? Intrigued by Psychology? All of these subjects can make great college majors. College isn't necessarily about preparing you for a single future job. …

Have a passion for history? Love French literature? Intrigued by Psychology? All of these subjects can make great college majors. College isn't necessarily about preparing you for a single future job. It's about learning how to learn, how to think, how to express yourself articulately, how to be collaborative, and how to succeed under pressure. Studying something you love or are at least interested in will likely be more valuable long-term than a “practical” degree you don’t engage with. This short presentation will walk you through the pros of a Liberal Arts education in the 21st Century marketplace and illustrate why an English Degree with Honors is worth more than a C-average Business degree.

Published in: Education

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
951
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Knowing that your liberal arts degree will give you transferable skills that can make you marketable, what are some ways to flesh out your education with practical skills and marketable experiences?
  • Knowing that your liberal arts degree will give you transferable skills that can make you marketable, what are some ways to flesh out your education with practical skills and marketable experiences?
  • If ALL liberal arts degrees confirm many of the same transferable skills, how important is your individual major?
  • If your particular major is not very important, why might it be better to major in something you are interested in rather than a “practical” degree like business or accounting?
  • Knowing that your liberal arts degree will give you transferable skills that can make you marketable, what are some ways to flesh out your education with practical skills and marketable experiences?
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Value of a Liberal Arts Education Benjamin J. Howard-Williams, MAEd Last Updated: Apr 30, 2014 benjaminjhw.strikingly.com benjaminjhw@gmail.com Image by Will Folsom - Used Under a Creative Commons License
    • 2. One: What is a Liberal Arts Education?
    • 3. “The areas of learning that cultivate general intellectual ability rather than technical or professional skills…The word liberal comes from the Latin liberalis, meaning suitable for a free man, as opposed to a slave” (American Heritage, 2011).
    • 4. Broad degrees with specific academic focus ● English ● History ● Political Science ● Psychology ● Religious Studies ● Communications, etc. These teach you critical thinking and transferable skills that could apply to many careers. Image by Sigfrid Lundberg - Used Under a Creative Commons License Associate of Arts / Bachelor of Arts
    • 5. Assoc. of Science / Bachelor of Science / Bachelor of Fine Arts Professional or Technical/Applied Degrees ● Education ● Nursing ● Fine Arts / Theatre Arts ● Musical Performance ● Engineering ● The Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, etc.) These teach you to be proficient in a particular skill set or profession.
    • 6. Two: What’s the Purpose of a Liberal Arts Education?
    • 7. “Well Rounded” student ● Broadly Informed ● Able to consider, evaluate, and respond to information, opinions, etc. ● Able to articulate one’s own thoughts and opinions. Empowered to act in your own best interest. (Humphreys, 2013) Individual Purpose...
    • 8. “…if a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.” Thomas Jefferson, 1816 Image by Navin Rajagopalan, used under a creative commons license.
    • 9. An educated citizenry is a democratic value. Educated, informed citizens can meaningfully contribute to their own governance. (Humphreys, 2013) Societal Purpose...
    • 10. Three: What’s the Value of a Liberal Arts Education?
    • 11. What are employers looking for? Top 5 Areas: Critical Thinking Problem Solving Written & Oral Communication Applied Knowledge Also Important: Ethical Judgement Intercultural Skills Capacity for continued learning (AAC&U, 2013)Image by BPSUF, used under a Creative Commons license.
    • 12. What are You Learning? Speaking Writing Analytical Skills Interpersonal Skills Problem-Solving Adaptability Broad Base of Knowledge... (Gehlhaus, 2007-08) Image by Tjsalo, used under a creative commons license. TRANSFERABLE SKILLS... You can take these skills to ANY work environment.
    • 13. ALL rated more important than computer skills….why? Employers can TEACH you how to use their technical systems. Employers will not teach you to think, communicate, or collaborate.Image by Glenn Fleishman, used under a Creative Commons license.
    • 14. Four: Making the most of your Liberal Arts Education.
    • 15. Importance of my major…? Business School: Yale School of Management MBA Program: Only one in five of the 2010 class had a business or marketing background. (Bast, 2010). Law School: Law school will teach you the law. To get in, a strong undergrad resume with good grades and recommendations is important, a pre-law degree is not. (Wunch, 2005). Workforce: “…most hiring managers care more about a job candidate’s skills than they do about a college major.”(Gehlhaus, 2007-08).
    • 16. “The most successful students have a flexible & curious mind...Students must realize they will have many jobs over the course of their lifetimes and must prepare for that reality...” (Anne Mahle, as quoted in Humphreys, 2013). “Transferable skills and competencies are vital in today’s labor market…” (Keeling, Nielsen, Jones, Dickson, & Priori, 2013)
    • 17. Major in Something you LIKE! You’ll get… Better Grades More Marketable Experiences Stronger Relationships with Faculty Better Networking with Fellow Students Image by University of Salford, used under a Creative Commons license.
    • 18. Make the MOST of your College Experience... Beyond your Major: ● Minor in something(good place to add a “practical” discipline like Business or Accounting…) ● Work or Volunteer ● Take an Internship ● Participate in Extracurricular Activities ● Pursue Student Leadership ● Travel Abroad ALL can be marketable experiences to add to a resume and/or interview response. (Humphreys, 2013)
    • 19. Bottomline... A Liberal Arts Education = Good Investment IF you make the most of it! Adaptability and understanding how to learn are always valuable assets (Hofer, 2011).
    • 20. Your Degree is a Piece of Paper. Your skills, experiences, and network are what make you marketable. Image by Will Folsom - Used Under a Creative Commons License
    • 21. Works Citedi Association of American Colleges (2007). College learning for the new global century: a report from the national leadership council for liberal education & america's promise. Washington D.C.: Association of American Colleges. Retrieved from http://www.aacu.org/leap/documents/GlobalCentury_final.pdf Association of American Colleges & Universities (2013). It takes more than a major: Employer priorities for college learning and student success. Retrieved from http://www.aacu.org/sites/default/files/files/LEAP/2013_EmployerSurvey.pdf. Bast, A. (2010, April 05). The case for a useless degree. The Daily Beast, Retrieved from http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2010/04/05/the-case-for-a- useless-degree.html Gehlhaus, D. (Winter 2007-08). What can I do with my liberal arts degree? Occupational outlook quarterly, 51(4), 02-11. Retrieved from http://www.bls. gov/opub/ooq/2007/winter/art01.pdf Hofer, B. (2011, August 11). Room for debate: preparation for a knowledge economy. The New York Times: The Opinion Pages, Retrieved from http://www. nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2011/08/23/spending-too-much-time-and-money-on-education/preparing-for-a-knowledge-economy?scp=1&sq=Room%20for% 20Debate%20Preparation%20for%20Work&st=cse Humphreys, D. (2013). Employers highlight experiences that matter. Leadership Exchange: Solutions for student affairs management, 11(3), 10-15. Keeling, R. P., Neilson, S., Jones, J. D., Dickson, J., & Priori, A. C. (2013). Liberal education: A pathway to career and life success. Leadership Exchange: Solutions for student affairs management, 11(3), 16-19. Liberal Arts. (n.d.). The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition. Retrieved September 16, 2011, from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Liberal Arts Steinberg, J. (2011, May 24). New york times: the choice [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://thechoice.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/05/24/whats-it-worth Wunch, C. (2005, December 22). Interview by B Howard [Personal Interview]. Law school informational interview.
    • 22. About the author Benjamin is an educator, student services professional, and academic coach living in the suburbs of Kansas City. Benjamin is a member of the Kansas Association Student Financial Aid Administrators (KASFAA), the Kansas Association of Colleges and Employers (KACE), and the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA). In 2012, he was awarded the Johnson County Community College Rookie of the Year award and nominated for the NASPA Region IV New Professionals Rising Star award. Beyond his professional role, Benjamin also guest presents and teaches workshops around the Kansas City area on a variety of subjects including College Financial Aid basics and the value of a Liberal Arts education in a 21st century job market. For more information, visit: www.strikingly.com/benjaminjhw

    ×