Classical Greece<br />By Ben Coley<br />
Introduction to Classical Greece<br />The Greeks have made a considerable contribution to Western Civilization, and the re...
Classical Greece: The Organization<br />The civilization of Greece was quite sizeable, so a single political unit wasn’t v...
Classical Greece: Politics<br />Democracy, a form of government founded by the Classical Greeks, comes from the Greek word...
Classical Greece: Economy<br />The Classical Greeks relied significantly on agricultural production.<br />Many of the farm...
Classical Greece: Religion<br />Greek religion was the belief in a set of gods and goddesses who watched over humans. <br ...
Classical Greece: Culture<br />The Greek culture can best be described through the stressing of philosophy and science, wi...
Classical Greece: Culture (Cont’d)<br />Arts<br />Such writers as Sophocles and Homer provided theatrical and literary ent...
Classical Greece: Society<br />The aristocrats were at the top of the societal pyramid and basically controlled most of th...
Classical Greece: The Various Contributions<br />Government<br />The idea of democracy has spread across the world because...
Classical Greece: A Final Comparison<br />Rome<br />The Greeks had a direct democracy in place in some areas while the Rom...
Sources Cited<br />Barrow, Mandy. "Who were the Ancient Greeks?." Ancient Greece. Woodlands Junior School, n.d. Web. 23 Se...
Sources Cited (Cont’d)<br />"Epidaurus Theater." Photograph. Wikipedia, Web. 25 Sep 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fi...
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Ben Coley-Greece

  1. 1. Classical Greece<br />By Ben Coley<br />
  2. 2. Introduction to Classical Greece<br />The Greeks have made a considerable contribution to Western Civilization, and the rest of the world.<br />The innovative and transcending inventions and discoveries have effectively changed the fields of math and science<br />The Greeks were also the first to write down history, and are the founders of democracy, which had a significant impact on the roles of government throughout history.<br />Classical Greece is divided into three specific periods-Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic.<br />
  3. 3. Classical Greece: The Organization<br />The civilization of Greece was quite sizeable, so a single political unit wasn’t very feasible. <br />The Greek civilization was divided into several city-states, each with their own laws and money, however, everyone within the empire spoke the same language.<br />The city states were commonly ruled by a tyrant or an aristocratic council.<br />The two most important city states were Athens and Sparta. <br />Athens was more of a commercial city state with the use of slaves and artistic leadership.<br />Sparta was comprised of a dominant military, which was ran under an aristocracy.<br />
  4. 4. Classical Greece: Politics<br />Democracy, a form of government founded by the Classical Greeks, comes from the Greek word “demos”, meaning “the people”.<br />In Athens, one of the more significant city states, decisions and deliberations came through generals assemblies, and citizens had the opportunity to participate, though few ever did.<br />This particular process is known as direct democracy, an innovative governmental feature during the time of the Greeks. <br />Women had absolutely no political rights, and half of the adult males weren’t citizens either. <br />Greek politics can best be defined through the use of aristocratic assemblies. The word aristocracy means “rule of the best” in Greek. <br />Ancient crown worn by Greek Aristocracy<br />
  5. 5. Classical Greece: Economy<br />The Classical Greeks relied significantly on agricultural production.<br />Many of the farmers were independent, which meant they owned their plots of landing and claimed some social and political standing. <br />Slaves were also commonly used, because wars and increased colonization made them easier to seize. <br />Because the land of Greece is quite mountainous and rocky, seagoing trade rose substantially. <br />As Greece grew more economically and commercially sound, social classes began to widen, which lead to social inequalities. <br />
  6. 6. Classical Greece: Religion<br />Greek religion was the belief in a set of gods and goddesses who watched over humans. <br />Zeus was the creator god, along with other gods with specific duties such as Apollo who regulated the passage of the sun or Neptune who paid attention to the seas. <br />Ceremonies for the gods were a regular occurrence, and many looked to the gods for help and strength for the future. <br />Stories of the gods were often told through literary works, making the religion more secular in nature. <br />Quite a few citizens were unsatisfied with the religion because it didn’t give any substantial ethical guidelines or standards. <br />
  7. 7. Classical Greece: Culture<br />The Greek culture can best be described through the stressing of philosophy and science, with an unique artistry.<br />Philosophy<br />Aristotle, Socrates, and Plato are some examples of philosophers during Classical Greece.<br />They encouraged citizens to challenge conventional wisdom, in which the human ability to think was cherished over spirituality. <br />Aristotle<br />
  8. 8. Classical Greece: Culture (Cont’d)<br />Arts<br />Such writers as Sophocles and Homer provided theatrical and literary entertainment respectively in Classical Greece. <br />Architecture and sculptures are examples of visual arts that the Greeks excelled at. They emphasized “the human figure”.<br /> Math and Science<br />The Greeks achievements in geometry were transcending, as theorists such as Pythagoras came up with impactful theorems (Pythagorean Theorem).<br />Discoveries in anatomy and astronomy came to influence Greece as conventional wisdom for many years till other discoveries came along later to disprove them. <br />
  9. 9. Classical Greece: Society<br />The aristocrats were at the top of the societal pyramid and basically controlled most of the wealth. <br />The Greek society was stressed a close family structure that was patriarchal in nature.<br />Women did seem to have some influence within the household, but when it came to law or politics, they were considered greatly inferior. <br />The Greek society’s lack of advancement in technology caused it to fall behind other classical Asian civilizations such as India and China. <br />
  10. 10. Classical Greece: The Various Contributions<br />Government<br />The idea of democracy has spread across the world because of the impactful Classical Greece society. <br />Architecture<br />The pillar-like style of Greek architectural design can be seen in many buildings around the world today, especially the White House. <br />Sports<br />The Olympics were used as a way to display superior athletic ability through competition in Classical Greece, and today, the Olympics continues to accomplish the same objective, but among the whole world. <br />Medicine<br />Hippocrates created the Hippocratic Oath, something that most doctors around the world swear by, in which they will perform their duties ethically. <br />
  11. 11. Classical Greece: A Final Comparison<br />Rome<br />The Greeks had a direct democracy in place in some areas while the Romans had a representative democracy.<br />Greece was organized into city-states, while Rome was considered an empire.<br />China and India<br />Among these three classical civilizations, all of them maintained a relatively rigid social structure.<br />The Greeks religion’s was rather “of this world” in comparison to China and India, who had more of a spiritually-based religion.<br />
  12. 12. Sources Cited<br />Barrow, Mandy. "Who were the Ancient Greeks?." Ancient Greece. Woodlands Junior School, n.d. Web. 23 Sep 2011. <http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/Homework/Greece.html>.<br />"The Parthenon." Photograph. Web. 23 Sep 2011. <http://wallpapers.free-review.net/63__Greece_Parthenon.htm>.<br />"Greek Wallpaper." Photograph. Web. 23 Sep 2011. <http://www.greeklandscapes.com/downloads.html>.<br />"Discus Thrower." Photograph. Web. 23 Sep 2011. <http://mjmurton.com/art.aspx>.<br />Guisepi, Robert. "A History of Ancient Greece." N.p., 1998. Web. 23 Sep 2011. <http://dancevidstv.com/WebPages/DanceVids%20Official%20WebSite.html>.<br />"The Erechtheion on the Acropolis (2)." Photograph. Web. 24 Sep 2011. <http://www.padfield.com/greece/athens/>.<br />"Hermes and the Infant Dionysus." Photograph. Web. 24 Sep 2011. <http://www.fotopedia.com/albums/_VzyNxTHtkg/entries/4oxgYkmEooQ>.<br />"Temple of Hera." Photograph. Web. 24 Sep 2011. <http://www.artchive.com/artchive/G/greek/greek_hera4.jpg.html>.<br />
  13. 13. Sources Cited (Cont’d)<br />"Epidaurus Theater." Photograph. Wikipedia, Web. 25 Sep 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:07Epidaurus_Theater07.jpg>.<br />"The Temple of Zeus." Photograph. 2006. Web. 25 Sep 2011. <http://www.mccullagh.org/photo/1ds-12/temple-of-zeus>.<br />"Ancient Athens Democracy." Photograph. Web. 27 Sep 2011. <http://greece.mrdonn.org/athensdemocracy.html>.<br />"Ancient Greece Map." Photograph. Web. 27 Sep 2011. <http://greece.mrdonn.org/sparta.html>.<br />"Ancient Greece." Photograph. Web. 27 Sep 2011. http://questgarden.com/113/23/8/101107085207/process.htm<br />"Zeus." Photograph. Web. 27 Sep 2011. <http://4ckgreekmyths.wikispaces.com/Zeus>.<br />"Greek Cartoon." Photograph. Web. 27 Sep 2011. <http://offthemark.com/cartoons/ancient+greece/>.<br />"Olympic Games." Photograph. Web. 27 Sep 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olympic_Games>.<br />Stearns, Peter, Michael Adas, Stuart Schwartz, and Marc Gilbert. World Civilizations. four. New York: Pearson Inc., 2006. Print.<br />
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