Offshore wind supply chain bilbao   alan 28 feb 2012
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Offshore wind supply chain bilbao alan 28 feb 2012

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Offshore wind supply chain bilbao   alan 28 feb 2012 Offshore wind supply chain bilbao alan 28 feb 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • Offshore Wind & Supply ChainOpportunitiesWorkshop in Bilbao28th February 2012
  • Offshore Wind Market OverviewRenewables• EU target of 20% of energy from renewables by 2020• UK target is 15% from renewables by 2020 (or 30 to 35% of electricity)Offshore Wind Market• UK Targets: • 39 GW between Scotland, Rounds 1, 2, 2.5 and 3 • ~2GW currently in operation• European Targets: • Germany (25GW ), Netherlands (6GW), France (6GW ), Spain (5GW) • Denmark, Norway, Belgium and others• Total Market >80GW in Europe (could be peaks of installation of 10GW/year) 2
  • Iberdrola Projects Around Europe Germany1 Wikinger (Baltic Sea). 400 MW under development.1 1000 MW under development United Kingdom 4 12 West of Duddon (Round 2). 500 MW under development with Dong 2 33 East Anglia Zone Target 7,200 MW. JVA with Vattenfall. 5 Site investigation award for Argyll Array in Scottish waters. Up to4 1.800 MW France5 Project sunder development up to 1000 MW Spain 66 3000 MW applied in 2007. 3
  • UK Round 3 Projects Zone Winners 1.Moray firth EDP & SeaEnergy 2.Firth of Forth SSE & Fluor 3.Dogger Bank Forewind 4.Hornsea Mainstream & Siemens 5.Norfolk Iberdrola (SPR) & Vattenfall 6.Hastings Eon 7.Isle of Wight Eneco 8. Bristol RWE Npower Channel 9. Irish Sea Centrica 4
  • Iberdrola UK Projects SummaryWest of Duddon Sands – Round 2(<500MW). JV with DONGArgyll Array – Scottish Territorial WatersAward (<1800MW)East Anglia Zone 5 – Round 3(7200MW). JV with VattenfallCombined installed capacity of 9500MW(SPR share equal to 5730 MW)On today’s prices, capital investment of~£30 BillionWill be constructed 2013 – 2023 5
  • Supply Chain Challenges & Opportunities• The task ahead (33GW and £90Billion) seems extremely challenging when taken all at once – especially if perception of lack of capital exists.• But this can be achieved with several smaller steps.• Capital will be available when construction & operation methods are improved and the technology is proven.• This will require investment by the supply chain – who must have confidence to invest in R&D, systems, facilities etc.• This will also require a track record of live projects to become ‘proven’.• This is where developers/utilities and the supply chain must work closer together than before.• If so, then these initial steps can be the start of a very significant journey.• In parallel, discussions with the funders of later projects must take place. 6
  • Onshore vs Offshore Cost Balance PROJECT PROJECT DEVELOPMENT AND ONSHORE DEVELOPMENT OFFSHORE SUBSTATION AND AND MANAGEMENT 5% SUBSTATION AND EXPORT CABLE MANAGEMENT 4% EXPORT CABLE 9% 10% ELECTRICAL INTER ELECTRICAL INTER ARRAY 5% ARRAY 7% TURBINES 40%CIVIL AND AUXILIARY WORKS 11% CIVIL AND TURBINES 70% AUXILIARY WORKS 25% INSTALLATION 14% Onshore is dominated by turbines Offshore is much more balanced 7
  • Foundation TypesMonopile Gravity base structure Jacket structures• Medium water depths • All water depths • Deeper water depths• Medium size turbines • Larger turbines • Larger turbines• Sand – clay seabed • Higher load-bearing capacity • Suitable for different seabed• Environmental sensitivities conditions • Seabed preparation required 8
  • Keystone Foundation 9
  • Suction Bucket Foundation 10
  • Installation Techniques • Major cost component • Substantial weather risk • New techniques under development • Vessel availability key consideration 11
  • Offshore Wind Turbines• Big political push for turbine manufacture in UK• Developers will contract directly with turbine manufacturers• Significant component requirements near OEM location• Limited proven technology – 3MW, 3.6MW, 5MW• Next generation of turbines 5MW to 7MW – Improves logistics – Reduces foundation and connection requirements• Technology must have proven reliability – Clear technology roadmaps needed – Test & Demo critical role to play – More Test sites needed• Possible range of turbine types per project 12
  • Operations & MaintenanceLocal Harbour Based Facility:• Control Room• Stores• Logistics Management• Helicopters• Weather MonitoringFar Shore Project:• Personnel based offshore• Mother-ship / accommodation platform• Workboats for transfer to WTG’s 13
  • Electrical EquipmentCABLING• Large cable demand – array and export• Capacity limited, new facilities/lines will take time to commission and prove• Work required to deal with the installation of array cablesSUBSTATIONS• Bespoke nature slows procurement and production process• Large fabrication capacity required (as with jackets)• DC and AC required – some connections greater than 100km• DC conversion technology potentially requiredSYSTEMS• HVDC technology currently being developed• Improved grid designs are crucial (reduce losses, improve reliability and redundancy, reduce capex etc)OFTO• Long term owner of offshore transmission assets will be the licensed Offshore Transmission Operator (OFTO) 14
  • Consultancy ServicesLarge volumes of expert advisory services required: • Environmental Experts: Sea bed, sea life, birds, mammals, coastal protection, onshore impacts etc • Offshore surveying: Geophysical, geotechnical etc • Engineering: Electrical, structural, civil, mechanical etc • Wind yield analysis • Port and logistics experts • Vessel operators, marine warranty surveyors etc • Legal advisers • Insurance Advisers • Health & Safety professionals 15
  • Offshore Surveys• Offshore met masts• Geophysical / geotechnical surveys• Environmental surveys• Meteocean surveys• Navigation & fishing studies 16
  • Marine Renewables - Overview• Significant global resource potential: • 250 GW wave, 60 GW tidal• Areas of best resource have been identified: • UK, France, Spain, Ireland, Portugal • USA, Canada, Mexico, South America • Australia, New Zealand• EU & Member States are developing supportive policies • This is especially the case in the UK• A range of full-scale prototypes are being deployed• Large-scale array projects are being prepared• Very strong political & policy support in Scotland 17
  • SPR Activity in Wave and Tidal Energy• SPR has a phased plan to develop a market-leading position• First step is prototype trials, now underway: Hammerfest 1MW Tidal device, Pelamis 750kW Wave Device Installed EMEC Dec 2011 Installation at EMEC Imminent• Second step is array deployment – Islay 10MW Tidal Project• Islay consent is secured, deployment awaits test outcome• Large scale commercial projects also under development: • Duncansby (tidal, 95MW) & Marwick Head (wave, 50MW) 18
  • Islay Tidal Project – A World First! • Developer: ScottishPower Renewables • Technology: Hammerfest Strøm • Local Partner: Islay Energy Trust • Size: Ten 1MW tidal devices • Location: Sound of Islay, Argyll, UK • Installation: 2014 onwards 19
  • 20
  • Orcadian Wave Project• Pelamis P-2 Device• World’s most advanced wave project• Vital role to prove performance• And facilitate commercial deployment• Manufacturing work completed• Tow to Orkney completed• Installation shortly• Collaboration with EONAccelerating commercialisation of wave technology 21
  • Conclusions• The offshore wind market is a huge opportunity• The Supply Chain has to be involved at an early stage: • Build capacity • Prove technology • Reduce risk • Reduce cost• Offshore Wind technology is still developing• This means opportunities for new market participants• UK content is still a political requirement• Standardisation and Industrialisation are also essential• Leading to a sustainable, profitable and safe offshore wind sector 22
  • Questions?Contacts:Alan MortimerHead of Innovation, ScottishPower Renewablesemail: alan.mortimer@scottishpower.comtel: +44-141-568-4421Ignacio Gomez De Oleo AlcanizSupply Chain DirectorIberdrola Renovables Offshore Windemail: igdeolea@iberdrola.esAlvaro Martinez PalacioOperations DirectorIberdrola Renovables Offshore Windemails: aap@iberdrola.es 23