Southern Mississippi Planning  and Development District             Tee McCovey              Deputy Director            Ma...
The Four Disciplines of Execution –Franklin Covey     Focus on                       Act on Lead      Wildly              ...
Indisputable Laws of Teamwork –John Maxwell• Clarity: brings understanding to the vision;  people must know where they are...
Indisputable Laws of Teamwork –John Maxwell• Stories: brings relationships to the vision• Challenge: brings stretching to ...
Go Coast 2020       Workforce Team Purpose To outline a workforce development  strategy as part of the economic restoratio...
Go Coast 2020The key priorities of the Workforce Go Team:1. Curriculum-related activities focusing on workforce   developm...
Gold Standards               PurposeDepartment of Labor, Employment and  Training Division, established this   program as ...
Gold StandardsEvaluation will focus on:1. Program impacts on participants’ post-program   employment and earnings and thei...
Hancock County                 …by the                 numbers
Workforce 101         Twin Districts        Workforce Area         January 24, 2013
System                                 Design Workforce                                           State and               ...
Workforce Investment Act of 1998     Customers must have     access to services at a         single       _______location....
Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Businesses should provide   leadership and play an active role in ensuring that    the sy...
Workforce Investment Act of 1998  Training and employment     programs should be  designed and managed at           local ...
Workforce Investment Act of 1998  Customers have a right to   information about how    well training providers            ...
Workforce Investment Act of 1998  The customer should have   choices in deciding what training program best meets    his/h...
Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Nitty Gritty               TDWA: Workforce 101
Workforce Investment Act of 1998    Show me      the     money!               TDWA: Workforce 101
Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Where does it come from?       How CAN we        spend it?  Where DO we  spend it now?   ...
Congress appropriates WIAfunds as part of the federal      budget process   Department of Labor – Employment       and Tra...
TDWA: Workforce 101
MS        Delta                                          Partnership                              Office of               ...
MS        Delta                                          Partnership                              Office of               ...
Adults   Dislocated             Youth          WorkersHow CAN we spend it?                          Twin                  ...
What toolsdo we have?                           Twin                          Districts    TDWA: Workforce 101
Résumé AssistanceOne-Stop (WIN Job) Centers             Individual Training Accounts (ITAs)Customized Training            ...
Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Where does it come from?       How CAN we        spend it?  Where DO we  spend it now?   ...
Eligible Training                      Providers                   (Community Colleges &                       other Train...
In-School and Out-of-SchoolYouth Programs                         Twin                        Districts  TDWA: Workforce 101
Construction Skills                 for the Future           (National Emergency Grant-                     Oil Spill)    ...
Contract Monitoring• Financial Review   – Procurement   – Fiscal accountability   – Expenditures and cost limitations• Pro...
Workforce Investment Act of 1998   State System   and Board   Structure               TDWA: Workforce 101
State Role• The Governor and the State Workforce Investment  Board (SWIB) provide state level oversight of the WIA  progra...
Workforce Investment Act of 1998  Training and employment     programs should be designed and managed and       at a LOCAL...
Local Elected Officials• Appoint individuals to the Local Workforce  Investment Board• _________all appointments and reapp...
Local WorkforceInvestment Board• Local strategy development• Policy creation and approval• Contract administration and ass...
Board Composition• The Workforce Investment Act outlines the  required composition for the Local Elected  Officials Board,...
You need a voice,Hancock County!      TDWA: Workforce 101
Board Member Role & Duties• Regularly attend meetings• Fulfill legal requirements of the board• Ask questions• Represent t...
As we go forward…Food for thought.  • How do we define our needs? –      Labor Market Data, Customized Projections  • How ...
IRS Migration Map              TDWA: Workforce 101
Special Thanks…• ALL Twin Districts workforce staff at SMPDD and  ECPDD and especially those who helped to create  the ori...
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SMPDD Hancock Co Workforce Visioning Presentation-Jan 2013

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  • Welcome to our Learning Luncheon. I love this title because it has two of my favorite words in it. Learning Luncheon. One implies the transfer of knowledge and the other implies the transfer of food. I truly enjoy both! Thank you for being here. I’ll begin by telling you what you can expect to happen…NOT CALCULUS!!!! This is not and in-depth examination of federal workforce policy and the history of workforce systems in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This is, instead, the Kindergarten version!!! We will take time at future meetings to get more in depth on specific topics, but we have a lot of new board members and we realized that even many of us who have worked in the system for years focus on just one piece of the pie. We are aiming here to give only a brief overview of the whole system.
  • Humans have been asking that age old question of “Where do we Come From?” since they could speak. For us the answer is easy. The Workforce Investment Act of 1998. It is at the heart of our system design, state and local structure, our funding streams and what expenses are allowable. Let’s look at it more closely by discussing the primary themes of this act.
  • We shouldn’t be sending customers to one place to register for employment, another to find out relevant labor market information and receive guidance and what fields are growing, another location to learn about possible training.
  • Employers know best what skills are needed in the workplace. Bureaucrats can be detached from on-the-ground needs of the workplace…especially where technology advancement drives training requirements.
  • Factors such as regional industry growth, demographics, population density and migration, culture and local resources all influence workforce needs differently in different areas.
  • What is required to finish this program? What percentage of those completing find jobs? Are those jobs related to this training?
  • Not all training is a “fit”. Individual inclinations, taste and aptitude lead us to difference options.
  • Divide into six groups. Five groups will concentrate on the five named values. One group will concentrate on the integration/implementation of all. Each group is given a flipchart page, markers, and flashcard describing the value AND how this value is integrated into our system. Have the “best-looking”, okay the one who everyone else points to, to read the flashcard to the group. Then that person assigns the “writer”. The group should list as many relevant reasons as they can to support this value. After 8 minutes, the group leader will present: first reading the flashcard to the room and then the group’s list.
  • Congress appropriates WIA funds as part of the federal budget process.The Department of Labor-Employment and Training Administration distributes the money to the states.
  • In Mississippi, the Office of Grant Management located at the Mississippi Department of Employment Security receives the money from DOL for distribution to the four Local Workforce Investment Areas: Delta, Mississippi Partnership, Southcentral Mississippi Works and Twin Districts.
  • In Mississippi, Planning and Development Districts are designated as the fiscal agents for the four workforce areas. The Twin Districts Workforce Area is comprised of counties from two PDDs. Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District is comprised of the lower 15 counties of our Workforce Area and serves as the fiscal agent for Twin Districts. East Central Planning and Development District is comprised of the upper nine counties of our Workforce Area and serves at the fiscal sub-agent for Twin Districts. Two staff members from ECPDD provide assistance for Workforce Activities within East Central’s area. We are grateful for the positive and productive partnership between these districts.
  • Our federal dollars come to us with names on them. Every dollar is assigned to be spent on either an adult, dislocated worker or youth. Adult – an individual who is 18 or older.Dislocated Worker – generally, a person who has lost employment through no fault of his or her own; could also include someone who has received notice that he or she will be laid off; displaced homemakers; someone unlikely to return to previous industry.You can spend ADULT dollars on DISLOCATED WORKERS, but not the reverse.Youth - any young person, between 16 and 21 years of age, who may be in school or out-of-school, and whose family income is does not exceed the higher of the poverty line or 70 percent of the lower living standard income level.What participant category our funds are identified by has a great deal to do with HOW we are able to spend them.
  • Whether called ADULT, DISLOCATED or YOUTH – all of our participants are people. They are people who need to transition from one field to another, people who have lost work, people who are upgrading skills to have a higher standard of living, people who are young and old, people who have worked all their lives and people who have not yet entered the workplace.They want to learn new things, have better jobs, provide for their families, grow in careers, apply new skills, become more marketable, use new technology, match their talents with employers needs, survive in our current economy and improve their circumstances.What tools and services do we, as a local workforce area, have to assist in those goals?
  • Although the law is restrictive, there are still a LOT of ways that we can help participants toward their goals. These are a few of them…not a comprehensive list. Now, once you memorize all of these and what they mean, we’ll try to confuse you further by calling them Core, Intensive or Training Services. Core services are available for all. More intensive and training services are available for those who need them.The GOOD news is that you don’t have to memorize all of this. It’s why, on the eighth day, God created handouts.
  • Okay, remember our three questions?
  • Adult and Dislocated funds are spent in many ways, but primarily toward operation of and services through the WIN Job Centers (we’re not sole source) and also ITAs and OJTs. This graphic represents a simplistic flow of the funds.We contract with the Mississippi Dept. of Employment Security (MDES) for the operation of federally designated One-Stop Centers that in MS we call WIN Job Centers. We also contract with MDES for the distribution of On-the-Job Training funds to local employers as a reimbursement of wages designed to help offset the cost of training employees. It is important to note here that OJT dollars give us one of our primary tools for assisting in the Economic Development process. When our economic developers are courting potential employers who are considering coming to the area – those employers want to know about the local workforce as it pertains to the skills that they need. Being able to also assist those employers with On-the-Job Training so that they can get the employees that they need and then train them in the required skills is a tremendous asset. We don’t do this alone and for new employers or expansions we also sometimes seek and receive assistance from the Mississippi Development Authority.We also contract with MDES for the distribution of funds in the form of Individual Training Accounts that you can think of almost like scholarships paid on behalf of individuals to Eligible Training Providers such as community colleges or private training institutions so that they can complete training in a high-demand occupation.Although we contract with MDES for the distribution of both OJT and ITA funds, our policies that you as board members help to create govern how those funds may be spent and our staff are also intimately involved in the guidance and administration of those dollars, so we remain connected to them in some form until they reach the individual who is receiving the training.Also, notice that this is the second time you see MDES in the flow of funding. The Office of Grant Management housed at MDES in Jackson is the original state recipient of WIA funds. They then distribute those funds to the four workforce areas including Twin Districts.
  • Sandie Brock, please stand.Out-of-school Youth –An eligible youth who is a school dropout; or 2. has received a secondary school diploma or its equivalent but is basic skills deficient, unemployed, or underemployed. 3. includes all youth except: (i) those who are attending any school and have not received a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, or (ii) those who are attending post-secondary school and are not basic skills deficientIn-School Youth – A youth enrolled in a secondary school program, and who is seeking a secondary school diploma.Of XXXXXX youth contracts that Twin Districts currently administers, only TWO are In-School. XXXXXX % of the money can be spent on in-school.
  • We looked at where the money originates, how it gets here and what we do with it. Now, what we really need to know as our dollars are ever-waning is do they make a difference? Where do they have the most leverage? What programs, providers and services perform the best? What bang do we get for our buck? This is the information that we need to make informed decisions. It will be the theme of many upcoming meetings. The truth is although we have been able to tell for a long time how the state as a whole does or even to compare among workforce areas, it has been harder to tell within a workforce area specifically what is happening according to the performance data. I’m not going to dwell here long, but know that we are in hot pursuit of these answers and we’ll be discussing this much much more over time.
  • The Workforce Investment Act and federal regulations require monitoring reviews for all providers receiving WIA funds contracted through our workforce area. Our monitor looks for compliance with federal and state regulations, TDWA policies and procedures and contract agreements and other applicable guidelines. Liz Loree, please stand.
  • We’ve discussed the basic tenets of WIA and the flow of funds. Let’s hit on the basic system structure.
  • We’ve discussed the basic tenets of WIA and the flow of funds. Let’s hit on the basic system structure.
  • You remember this slide from earlier when we discussed the primary tenets of the Workforce Investment Act. The Twin Districts Workforce Board as composed of the Local Elected Officials Board, the Local Workforce Investment Board and the Youth Council are how local design and management are achieved. We’ll briefly touch on each.
  • Unofficially – you serve as a voice for your county’s citizens as you appoint the LWIB member from your county and appoint someone else if that person is not showing up and doing their jobAlso responsible for the annual report to the governor
  • These are not all of the responsibilities of the local board, they also certify our WIN Job Centers and hold staff accountable.
  • blue counties send more migrants to the selected county than they take; red counties take more than they send
  • Introduce all staff in the room!
  • SMPDD Hancock Co Workforce Visioning Presentation-Jan 2013

    1. 1. Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District Tee McCovey Deputy Director Marilyn Minor One-Stop Administrator Rebecca Brown Director, Workforce Development
    2. 2. The Four Disciplines of Execution –Franklin Covey Focus on Act on Lead Wildly Measures Important Keep a Create a Compelling Cadence of Scoreboard Accountability
    3. 3. Indisputable Laws of Teamwork –John Maxwell• Clarity: brings understanding to the vision; people must know where they are going• Connectedness: brings the past, present and future together• Purpose: brings direction to the vision• Goals: brings targets to the vision• Honesty: brings integrity and credibility to the vision
    4. 4. Indisputable Laws of Teamwork –John Maxwell• Stories: brings relationships to the vision• Challenge: brings stretching to the vision• Passion: brings fuel to the vision• Modeling: brings accountability to the vision• Strategy: brings process to the vision
    5. 5. Go Coast 2020 Workforce Team Purpose To outline a workforce development strategy as part of the economic restoration of the Gulf Coast Region
    6. 6. Go Coast 2020The key priorities of the Workforce Go Team:1. Curriculum-related activities focusing on workforce development and training, as well as basic and life skills2. Infrastructure improvement and expansion3. Collaboration of education/training providers in high schools, community colleges and universities through partnerships and career pathways to meet the current and projected needs of the Coast’s employers; and a Trust Fund to provide an ongoing stable funding source for workforce development programs
    7. 7. Gold Standards PurposeDepartment of Labor, Employment and Training Division, established this program as an evaluation of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998
    8. 8. Gold StandardsEvaluation will focus on:1. Program impacts on participants’ post-program employment and earnings and their cost effectiveness2. Outcomes of WIA participants to the outcomes of similar individuals who did not receive WIA services
    9. 9. Hancock County …by the numbers
    10. 10. Workforce 101 Twin Districts Workforce Area January 24, 2013
    11. 11. System Design Workforce State and Local StructureInvestmentAct of 1998 Funding Streams Allowable Expenses TDWA: Workforce 101
    12. 12. Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Customers must have access to services at a single _______location. TDWA: Workforce 101
    13. 13. Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Businesses should provide leadership and play an active role in ensuring that the system prepares participants for current and future jobs. TDWA: Workforce 101
    14. 14. Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Training and employment programs should be designed and managed at local a ______level. TDWA: Workforce 101
    15. 15. Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Customers have a right to information about how well training providers succeed ________. TDWA: Workforce 101
    16. 16. Workforce Investment Act of 1998 The customer should have choices in deciding what training program best meets his/her needs and what organization can provide it. TDWA: Workforce 101
    17. 17. Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Nitty Gritty TDWA: Workforce 101
    18. 18. Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Show me the money! TDWA: Workforce 101
    19. 19. Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Where does it come from? How CAN we spend it? Where DO we spend it now? TDWA: Workforce 101
    20. 20. Congress appropriates WIAfunds as part of the federal budget process Department of Labor – Employment and Training Administration TDWA: Workforce 101
    21. 21. TDWA: Workforce 101
    22. 22. MS Delta Partnership Office of Grant ManagementSouthcentral (MDES) MS Works Twin Districts TDWA: Workforce 101
    23. 23. MS Delta Partnership Office of Grant ManagementSouthcentral (MDES) MS Works Twin Districts TDWA: Workforce 101
    24. 24. Adults Dislocated Youth WorkersHow CAN we spend it? Twin Districts TDWA: Workforce 101
    25. 25. What toolsdo we have? Twin Districts TDWA: Workforce 101
    26. 26. Résumé AssistanceOne-Stop (WIN Job) Centers Individual Training Accounts (ITAs)Customized Training On-the-Job Training (OJTs) Supportive Services In-School Youth ProgramsOut-of-School Youth Programs Computer Literacy Work ExperienceRapid Response Sessions Twin Career Counseling Districts Job Development TDWA: Workforce 101
    27. 27. Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Where does it come from? How CAN we spend it? Where DO we spend it now? TDWA: Workforce 101
    28. 28. Eligible Training Providers (Community Colleges & other TrainingLocal Employers Organizations) On-the-Job Individual TrainingTraining (OJT) Accounts (ITAs) WIN Job Centers Twin Districts MDES
    29. 29. In-School and Out-of-SchoolYouth Programs Twin Districts TDWA: Workforce 101
    30. 30. Construction Skills for the Future (National Emergency Grant- Oil Spill) Computer Training at WINJob Centers (CCs) Twin Workforce Districts Coordinators (CCs) Additional Programs TDWA: Workforce 101
    31. 31. Contract Monitoring• Financial Review – Procurement – Fiscal accountability – Expenditures and cost limitations• Programmatic Review – Labor standards – Grievance procedures – EEO and ADA – Eligibility _________ verification – Program performance• Administrative Procedures – Property management – Internal monitoring – Audit and audit resolution TDWA: Workforce 101
    32. 32. Workforce Investment Act of 1998 State System and Board Structure TDWA: Workforce 101
    33. 33. State Role• The Governor and the State Workforce Investment Board (SWIB) provide state level oversight of the WIA program• MDES (Office of Grant Management) acts as the Governor’s agent in MS • Interpreting Federal policy and setting State policy and regulation • Maintaining the state performance management system • Providing technical assistance • Serving as ________to USDOL liaison TDWA: Workforce 101
    34. 34. Workforce Investment Act of 1998 Training and employment programs should be designed and managed and at a LOCAL level TDWA: Workforce 101
    35. 35. Local Elected Officials• Appoint individuals to the Local Workforce Investment Board• _________all appointments and reappointments Certify• Ensure legal composition of the Local Workforce Investment Board• Serve as grant recipient; fiscally liable party for grant funds under WIA Title I TDWA: Workforce 101
    36. 36. Local WorkforceInvestment Board• Local strategy development• Policy creation and approval• Contract administration and assignment• Oversight for fiscal, regulatory and performance compliance• Coordination of activities with economic development and education/training needs Youth• Appoint _______ Council TDWA: Workforce 101
    37. 37. Board Composition• The Workforce Investment Act outlines the required composition for the Local Elected Officials Board, the Local Workforce Investment Board and the Youth Council as a component of the LWIB. Private sector representation as well as members of Labor, Economic Development, Community Organizations and One-Stop Partners are all important.• The By-Laws of the LEO and LWIB further outline composition. TDWA: Workforce 101
    38. 38. You need a voice,Hancock County! TDWA: Workforce 101
    39. 39. Board Member Role & Duties• Regularly attend meetings• Fulfill legal requirements of the board• Ask questions• Represent the needs of your industries, organizations, counties and communities• Serve as a leader through volunteering for the One- Stop Committee, Local Plan Committee or Youth Council when there are vacancies• Keep informed• Keep in touch TDWA: Workforce 101
    40. 40. As we go forward…Food for thought. • How do we define our needs? – Labor Market Data, Customized Projections • How do we ensure that training meets those needs? – Performance & Accountability • How do we develop and KEEP our human resources?Resources:TDWA By-laws, www.usdoleta.gov, www.nationalskillscoalition.org/resources, MDES OGM Training Providerspresentation, www.mdes.ms.gov, WIA Title I, www.gao.gov TDWA: Workforce 101
    41. 41. IRS Migration Map TDWA: Workforce 101
    42. 42. Special Thanks…• ALL Twin Districts workforce staff at SMPDD and ECPDD and especially those who helped to create the original board orientation session and materials• Tee McCovey for re-initiating board orientation• MDES Office of Grant Management for sharing resources• All current TDWA board members and workforce partners TDWA: Workforce 101

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