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Week 5 Review Done Spr
 

Week 5 Review Done Spr

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  • Unique—life story told in pictuere?? STATS PERCENT SELF PORTS irony, study of major netherlandish artists from this century revolves around two really monumental names, vermeer and rembrandt, and in every way they come to us as very opposite—about one we no next to nothing, but about the other we know so much that to study him is feel a kind of intimacy, the intimacy is of course a delusion, but he is unique in that no other artist has left within his body of work such introspection, and this introspection seems to be an open invitation into his life, and we can watch him grow, in art’s finest series of self-portraits, from a cocky and energetic kid, into a confident and headstrong man at the top of his field, then through a series of tragedies turn into a sober middle-aged man, and in the end confront himself with a merciless eye as an old man searching for meaning.
  • so starts getting involved in the portraits, helps make him money; this later, from 50s
  • Like I said, it was a traditional thing, group ports and militia ports, but rembr changes the formula drastically. for one thing, 18 people involed in the comm, but he paints much more, even kids in there
  • kid, wearing a man’s helmet, too big, they would use kids to run gun powder to the musketeers—partly cropped when painting cut down—that dot on him not part of the painting, what that is, honestly, is what happens when you try to scan small details at high fidelity without taking the time to clean the plate of the scanner. ANYWAY, ACTIVE FIGURES, SCENE OF ACTION
  • TO GIVE SOME VARIETY, SOME EXTRA VISUAL INTEREST, BUT ALSO ACTIVE FIGURES—TRY TO MOVE IT AWAY FROM BEING A PASSIVE SCENE OF GUYS JUST STANDING AROUND, DRUMMER, POWDERBOY, ACTIVE FIGURES, TURN IT INTO A SCENE OF ACTION, LIKE HE IS ORDERING THEM OUT TO MARCH
  • Also tries to give it more profound level of meaning by using allegories and metaphors
  • Allegorical figures—GO TO THE RIGHT, OTHERS TO THE LEFT, SO TWO DIFF REALITIES, DEFINED BY DIRECTION OF MOVEMENT, ALSO ARCHIAC COSTUME, PLUS SCALE SMALLER, GUY LOADING A TRANSITION? NOT AS ARCHAIC COSTUME, AND ONLY TURNING THE OTHER WAY
  • defintiely allegorical, because not only dangerous, it was technically illegal
  • Actually girls, because two of them
  • Standard bearer
  • it is not thought she did this with ill intention—in fact, it is thought that she believed that since he had been so successful, that he would continue to be, and able to provide for both himself and titus quite ably, so he really didn’t need her half. this would cause him great trouble, because he had been living high on the hog, way beyond his means, and had of course just purchased a large house he could barely afford with a very heavy mortgage, and a total spendthrift, auctions, etc., and his style was beginning to go out of style, and in fact it turned out that he was not able to continue to support himself and titus, and this stipulation in the will was a real dagger in the end. among other things, can’t marry—sued by gertghe, first nurse he had brought in, claimed they had been shacking up and he had promised to marry her. to marry her would have violated the will and been a major problem for him and titus, he denied this charge, but was forced to pay her support, so that added a debt.
  • that house really brought him down—NOT JUST PAINTINGS BY HIM, BUT AN AMAZING ART COLLECTION HE HAD AQUIRED, INCLUDING PAINTINGS BY RAPHAEL AND GIORGIONE.

Week 5 Review Done Spr Week 5 Review Done Spr Presentation Transcript

  • REMBRANDT VAN RIJN --Born in Leiden, 1606 --Originally studied under van Swanenburgh --At the age of 17 or 18, went to Amsterdam to study under Lastman, a more capable master
  • The Money Changer by Rembrandt (1627) Chiaroscuro, “Tenebrism”
  • Portrait of Jan Six (Burgomaster of Amsterdam) Early success: becomes the leading painter in Amsterdam, including portraits for leading citizens and important groups; commission for the House of Orange. REMBRANDT: PORTRAITURE
  • Silverpoint drawing of Saskia van Uylenburgh by Rembrandt (1633)  “ This was drawn after my wife, when she was 21 years old, the third day after our betrothal—the 8 th of June, 1633.” REMBRANDT: SASKIA
  • Saskia van Uylenburgh -Cousin of an art dealer with whom Rembrandt lived and rented studio space when he moved to Amsterdam. -From a well-connected family, she brought him a large dowry and an entrée into social circles which benefited his career. -Frequently served as Rembrandt’s model. REMBRANDT: SASKIA
  • REMBRANDT: THE NIGHTWATCH (1642) “ The Militia Company of Captain Banning Cocq” A group portrait for the Kloveniers militia
  • REMBRANDT: THE NIGHTWATCH (1642)  18 members involved in the commission, but Rembrandt paints 30+
  • REMBRANDT: THE NIGHTWATCH (1642)  Powder boy Extra figures: adds visual interest, and also provides active figures
  • REMBRANDT: THE NIGHTWATCH (1642) Banning Cocq: gesturing, speaking; as if ordering the men to march out 
  • REMBRANDT: THE NIGHTWATCH (1642) Glove: challenge 
  • REMBRANDT: THE NIGHTWATCH (1642) Musketry: The musket was the special weapon of the Kloveniers militia
  • REMBRANDT: THE NIGHTWATCH (1642) Laurel leaves: victory 
  • REMBRANDT: THE NIGHTWATCH (1642)  Chicken, tied by its claws 
  • REMBRANDT: THE NIGHTWATCH (1642) Insignia of the Kloveniers militia
  • Saskia: dies in 1642. Holding a joint estate with Rembrandt, her will stipulated that her half did not go to him, but to Titus when he married or came of age, Rembrandt got only any interest off of her half until that time. Further, if he were to remarry, her half was to go to one of her sisters, and Titus’s share would be forfeit, as Rembrandt’s stake in the interest.
  • Rembrandt—Financial Insolvency: -Had taken a large loan in 1639 to buy the house; after 15 years had only managed to pay off about a quarter of what he owed, and had also been ignoring taxes and interest. -Selling the house would have caused potential difficulties due to the terms of Saskia’s will, since they had owned it jointly and thus it was part of Titus’s inheritance. -Forced in 1656 to apply for a cessation of goods, whereby his possessions were auctioned off by his creditors, including his paintings, drawings, and prints.
  • Self-Portrait, 1660 Rembrandt in the 1660s: -Moves to a small rented house with Titus, Hendrickje, and his daughter Cornelia. -Obliged to turn over future sales of art to his creditors, he sets up a dummy corporation with Titus and Hendrickje as “art dealers” and Rembrandt as a salaried “ advisor.” -Again starts to receive important commissions, including the Syndics of the Draper’s Guild and Julius Civilis.
  • Self-Portrait, 1660 Both Titus and Hendrickje die in 1663, leaving Cornelia as his only surviving family.