Week 1 Review Done

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  • KNOWN FOR HIS BIZARRE SENSE OF HUMOR—IN THE SHOP, CIMABUE TOOK A BREAK, GIOTTO PAINTED A FLY ON THE NOSE OF ONE OF THE FIGURES, SO REALISTIC THAT CIMABUE CAME BACK IN AND STARTED TRYING TO BRUSH IT OFF, ONLY TO FINALLY REALIZE IT WASN’T REAL
  • Joachim had been rejected, but eventually will reunite with st anne then mary born at start of next cycle then life of christ
  • Joachim had been rejected, but eventually will reunite with st anne then mary born at start of next cycle then life of christ
  • Primary to disegno approach is drawing, and leo one of great draftsmen of alltime
  • the warmth of his colors would make him one of the great painters of sensuous nudes, really visceral, sensual style
  • But the straight lines are not the point here—incredible power, drama, atmospher
  • Week 1 Review Done

    1. 1. FORTITUDE (HERCULES) by NICOLA PISANO (ITALY; 13 th century) “ Renaissance:” rebirth of interest in the art of classical antiquity
    2. 2. GIOTTO (1267-1337): Portrait of Giotto by Benedetto da Maiano --Worked primarily in Florence --Studied under Cimabue --His innovations are generally considered to mark a transition away from the Gothic period, and pave the way to the Renaissance --Abandoned the iconic gold backgrounds that had been typical of previous generations and was a pioneer of more natural settings, natural relationships among characters, and psychology --Pioneered the use of more 3 dimensional, physically tangible figures
    3. 3. Giotto: The Arena Chapel --Dedicated on the Feast of the Annunciation, 1303 --Commissioned by Enrico Scrovegni --Intended as a small, private chapel for his family, as well as his burial place --The name “Arena” comes from the fact there had been an old Roman arena here --67 feet long
    4. 4. Giotto: The Arena Chapel—Joachim Among the Shepherds
    5. 5. Giotto: The Arena Chapel—Joachim’s Dream
    6. 6. Giotto: The Arena Chapel—Crucifixion
    7. 7. Enrico Scrovegni and the Arena Chapel --Had the chapel built to expiate the sin of usury, through which his father, Reginaldo, had built the family fortune --Usury is the lending of money with interest --A desire to atone for usury explains certain aspects of the decorative scheme, which connect greed and damnation
    8. 8. Enrico Scrovegni and the Arena Chapel --Dante’s Inferno even included a character with a money bag with the Scrovegni family logo on it --His father died in 1300, and Enrico stopped the money lending business --He was apparently very concerned about his family’s salvation and that same year he bought the land for the chapel
    9. 9. Enrico Scrovegni and the Arena Chapel --1300 was a Jubilee year; he was seeking absolution, and the chapel was apparently part of an agreement with the Catholic church to secure an indulgence
    10. 10. Giotto: The Arena Chapel—The Betrayal of Judas Scenes with Judas: rare in art, but Judas was associated with usury since he had taken silver in exchange for betraying Christ; Giotto makes a point of emphasizing his money bag 
    11. 11. Giotto: The Arena Chapel—The Last Judgment Hung by strings of his money bag 
    12. 12. Giotto: The Arena Chapel—The Last Judgment  Enrico Scrovegni donating the chapel—presenting it to the Virgin of the Annunciation
    13. 13. Portrait of Giotto by Benedetto da Maiano Giotto: died 1337, but a new age in the art of painting had begun and flowered in especially Florence and Siena I am he through whose merit the lost art of painting was revived; . . . what my art lacked nature herself lacked; to none other was it given to paint more or better . . . I am Giotto, and my name alone tells more than a lengthy ode.—Inscription at Florence Cathedral under the portrait tondo of Giotto by Benedetto da Maiano Tondo: a round depiction
    14. 14. LINEAR (ONE POINT) PERSPECTIVE Vanishing point Orthagonals Transversals
    15. 15. LINEAR (ONE POINT) PERSPECTIVE
    16. 16. LINEAR (ONE POINT) PERSPECTIVE HOLY TRINITY by MASACCIO (Florence, Italy; 15th century)
    17. 17. “ The High Renaissance” Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) Florentine Michelangelo (1475-1564) Florentine Raphael (1483-1520) Moved to Florence
    18. 18. High Renaissance: LEONARDO DA VINCI (1452-1519) The Last Supper (1490s), Santa Maria delle Grazie Refectory Refectory: A place where monks and priests eat; a dining room
    19. 19. High Renaissance: LEONARDO DA VINCI (1452-1519) The Mona Lisa (Lisa Giacondo; 1503-05)
    20. 20. Leonardo da Vinci: Drawings, studies, “disegno” Disegno: --Development of the subject matter and composition through phases of preliminary study and drawing --This became the dominant method in Florence and Rome, and formed the basis for art theory in those cities
    21. 21. Studies for the Adoration of the Magi by Leonardo da Vinci: Drawings, studies, “disegno”
    22. 22. DISEGNO: The School of Athens and study by Raphael
    23. 23. DISEGNO: Studies for the Transfiguration The High Renaissance: RAPHAEL, Italy (1483-1520) 
    24. 24. Chalk Portrait of Michelangelo by Daniele da Volterra MICHELANGELO (1475-1564): --In Rome, meets a French cardinal who was retiring and want to leave something behind in his memory in the French chapel—he wanted a sculpted Pieta --It is this statue which brings Michelangelo, at age 24, to prominence
    25. 25. The High Renaissance: MICHELANGELO, Italy (1475-1564) The Pieta (1499)
    26. 26. Chalk Portrait of Michelangelo by Daniele da Volterra MICHELANGELO (1475-1564): --Returns to Florence in 1501; he had been promised a large piece of beautiful marble, 18 feet high, which had been sitting in the Cathedral workshop for many years --The stone, known as the “ Giant,” was intended for a sculpture for the church, but it had been botched by the sculptor Agostino di Duccio and no one could figure out what to do with it, or how to sculpt it --It is from this stone he sculpts his 17 foot tall David
    27. 27. The High Renaissance: MICHELANGELO, Italy (1475-1564) The David (1504)
    28. 28. Chalk Portrait of Michelangelo by Daniele da Volterra MICHELANGELO (1475-1564): --Called to Rome to work for Pope Julius II, who had several projects in mind --The first of these projects was Julius’s own tomb
    29. 29. The High Renaissance: MICHELANGELO, Italy (1475-1564) Moses (1515)
    30. 30. Chalk Portrait of Michelangelo by Daniele da Volterra MICHELANGELO (1475-1564): --In 1508 he is hired by Julius to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel; he tries to refuse the offer, claiming he is a sculptor, not a painter, but Julius insists --Spends the next 4 years painting the Sistine Ceiling, which is unveiled in 1512 --Will later return to the Sistine Chapel 25 years later to paint The Last Judgment on the altar wall
    31. 31. The High Renaissance: MICHELANGELO—Sistine Chapel
    32. 32. The High Renaissance: MICHELANGELO—Disegno
    33. 33. The High Renaissance: MICHELANGELO—Disegno The Libyan Sybil
    34. 34. The High Renaissance: MICHELANGELO—Sistine Chapel The Last Judgment (altar wall; 1537-41)
    35. 35. DISEGNO: The Last Judgment and studies by Michelangelo (Sistine Chapel, Rome)  Christ
    36. 36. The High Renaissance: MICHELANGELO—Architecture Dome of St. Peter’s (1564) --Michelangelo was appointed chief architect of St. Peter’s by Pope Paul III --As with the Sistine Ceiling paintings, he initially tried to decline the assignment, but the pope insisted --His major contribution was the dome above the church’s crossing
    37. 37. Chalk Portrait of Michelangelo by Daniele da Volterra Major accomplishments of MICHELANGELO: Sculpture: The Pieta, the David, and various sculptures for the tombs of the Medici and Julius II (including the Moses) Painting: Sistine Ceiling and the Last Judgment Architecture: Campidoglio and dome of St. Peter’s Literature: one of the leading poets and sonnet writers of the Italian Renaissance
    38. 38. DISEGNO COLORE Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael Giorgione,Titian, Tintoretto
    39. 39. DISEGNO COLORE Rome, Florence (“High Renaissance”) Venice  Venice Rome   Florence
    40. 40. Colore: Emphasis on spontaneity and freedom of stroke, expression, and composition; artists often worked directly on the canvas without preliminary drawings and studies; attempts to capture freshness of artistic expression; greater emphasis on color, atmosphere, and sensuality The Renaissance in Venice: Giorgione (1477-1510)
    41. 41. The Renaissance in Venice: Giorgione—Colore vs. Disegno Colore/Venetian artists as opposed to those in Florence and Rome: --Preliminary drawings typically do not survive --Don’t work in fresco --Do not represent classical subject matter as often --Less classical influence --More painterly
    42. 42. The Renaissance in Venice: Giorgione—Colore vs. Disegno He thought only of executing fanciful figures which would show his ability . . . I for one have never known what his pictures mean and no one has ever been able to explain them to me. Here is a man, there is a woman . . . it is impossible to tell what it all means. --Vasari on Girogione
    43. 43. --Born Tiziano Vecellio --The leading painter of the Venetian school; he became preeminent after Giorgione’s death, and retained his position for the next 60 years --The output over the span of his career is immense, and he was highly in demand not just in Italy but other parts of Europe as well --The works that first brought him fame were his paintings at the Church of the Frari in Venice, in particular the Assumption of the Virgin The Renaissance in Venice: Titian (1490-1576)
    44. 44. The Renaissance in Venice: Titian—Colore vs. Disegno
    45. 45. The Renaissance in Venice: Titian—Colore vs. Disegno
    46. 46. The Renaissance in Venice: Titian—Master of Colore He would be the greatest of all of us, if only he had “ disegno.” --Michelangelo’s comment to Vasari, after visiting Titian while he was painting Danae Danae (1553)
    47. 47. The Renaissance in Venice: Tintoretto (1518-1594) --His real name is Jacopo Robusti, but was nicknamed Tintoretto because he came from a family of dyers—dye is “tintore” --It is sometimes claimed that he may have studied under Titian, but there is no proof of this --Ran a large workshop, and one of his main assistants was his own daughter Maria, who was one of the most skilled Italian female artitists --Hated by Roman/Florentine critics such as Vasari, who considered him to represent everything that was wrong with Venetian painting The Last Supper (1592-94)
    48. 48. The Renaissance in Venice: Tintoretto—Colore vs. Disegno
    49. 49. The Renaissance in Venice: Tintoretto (1518-1594) The Last Supper (1592-94) He is extravagant in some of his inventions, and in those strange caprices of his fancy, which he has executed almost by haphazard and without design, in so much that one might suppose he well nigh desired to show that his art is only a joke. --Vasari on Tintoretto
    50. 50. The Renaissance in Venice: Colore vs. Disegno Portrait of Emperor Charles V and Self Portrait, both by Titian Emperor Charles V believes Titian is the finest painter in Europe and he knights him; Titian was the only painter to receive such an honor—the last time a painter was so honored was during the time of Alexander the Great

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