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Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey
Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey
Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey
Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey
Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey
Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey
Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey
Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey
Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey
Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey
Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey
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Part A - Personal Pedagogical Framework - Oral presentation - B Anstey

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EDP3333 - Pedagogy and Curriculum 3 …

EDP3333 - Pedagogy and Curriculum 3
Part A
Personal Pedagogical Framework
Oral presentation
Belinda Anstey
Student number: 0061018708

Published in: Education
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  • 1. PERSONAL PEDAGOGICAL FRAMEWORK ORAL PRESENTATION EDP3333 Curriculum and Pedagogy 3 Belinda Anstey
  • 2. “Learning is defined by the person defining it” (Mezirow, 2000) Some definitions of Learning (Curry, 1993) A change in behaviour as a result of experience or practice. The process of gaining knowledge. A process by which behaviour is changed, shaped or controlled. The individual process of constructing understanding based on experiences learning. Fig 1: Displays some definitions of learning. Fig 1: Shows Contemporary Learning Theory. Source: Studydesk.
  • 3. B ehaviorism and Constructivism Figure 4: Shows how Behaviourism and Constructivism are opposite.
  • 4. Constructivism and Theory “Constructivist learning is a student driven process in which learners develop, or construct, their understanding of information as they work with concepts and think about processes” (Richardson, 1997).  Piaget (1976) acknowledges that children are active learners that construct knowledge from their environment. Figure 5: Demonstrates the process in which knowledge is constructed. Adapted from Strategies and Model for Teachers (Eggan and Kauchak, 2006). Figure 6: Jean Piaget. Source: NNBD
  • 5. Behaviorism and Theory Figure 7: Demonstrates a routine timetable that my personal pedagogical framework would include. Adapted from Activity Arrival (rules, set expectations for day) (Teacher Directed) Reading groups (Teacher and student Directed) English (Teacher Directed ) Little lunch Maths (Teacher Directed then Child Directed) Music N/A Lunch Science (Child Directed) Figure 8: B.F. Skinner. Source: NAP. edu
  • 6. Teaching Strategy – K.W.L CHART W I Know (Facts) hat W I W to know hat ant (questions) W I have Learnt hat Figure 9: Adapted from Reflections on classroom thinking (Frangenheim, 2010) Frangenheim (2010) states ,“That this strategy enables students to activate background knowledge, create new questions and develop a purpose for the task”.
  • 7. Teaching Strategy - Round Robin Sheurrman (1998) states that, “The major benefit is that whereas in a whole group brainstorm only one person is responding, in Round Robin, every student is on task at all times”. Figure 10: Demonstrates the structure of Round Robin.
  • 8. HOW CAN LEARNERS JUDGE THE ACCURACY OF THEIR UNDERSTANDINGS? (OLSEN, 2003).
  • 9. Explicit Teaching – I DO, WE DO, YOU DO I DO (Demonstration/ Model) Teacher behaviour Student behaviour Thinks aloud Listen Models Observe WE DO (Guided Practice) YOU DO (Application) Teacher behaviour Student behaviour Listens Assist as needed Apply learning Explains Interacts Responds Problem solve Responds Collaborates Evaluates student learning Self monitor Acknowledges Participate Teacher behaviour Student behaviour Suggests
  • 10. Explicit Teaching enables and limits my pedagogical practice
  • 11. References Ashman, A. F., & Conway, R. N. F. (1997). An introduction to cognitive education: Theory and applications. London: Routledge. Borich, G. (2013). Effective Teaching Methods: Research-Based Practice. London: Pearson Education. Bringuier, J., & Piaget, J. (1989). Conversations with Jean Piaget. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Curry, L. (1993). An Organization of Learning Styles Theory and Constructs. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Retrieved 15 th October, 2013 from http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED235185. Devries, R. (1999). Implications of Piaget's Constructivist Theory for Character Education. The Journal of the Association of Teacher Educators. 20 (4). 39-47. doi:10.1080/01626620.1999.10462933. Dillfay, D., & Sassman, C. (2007). Teaching Effective Classroom Routines: Establish Structure in the Classroom to Foster Children's Learning-From the First Day of School and All Through the Year. New York: Scholastic Teaching Resources. Fosnot, C. (2005). Constructivism: Theory, Perspectives And Practice. Columbia: Teachers College Press. Frangenheim E. (2010) Reflections on classroom thinking strategies (9th Ed) Loganholme QLD: ITC Publications. McGregor, D. (2007). Developing Thinking; Developing Learning. New York: McGraw- Hill International. Mezirow, K. (2000). Learning as Transformation: Critical Perspectives on a Theory in Progress. New York: ERIC. Olson, D.(2003). Psychological theory and educational reform: how school remakes mind and society. New York: Cambridge University Press. Richardson, V. (1997). Constructivist Teacher Education: Building a World of New Understandings. New York: Routledge. Scheurman, G. (1998). From Behaviourist to Constructivist Teaching. Journal of Social Education. 62 (1). 6-9. Retrieved 11th October, 2013 from http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ565801. Skinner, B. F. (1968). The Technology of Teaching. New York: Meredith Corporation. Strong, W. (2001). Coaching writing: the power of guided practice. California, U.S.A: Heinemann Publishers. Images Skinner, B. F. [Image]. 2013. Retrieved from http://www.nndb.com/people/297/000022231/ Contemporary Learning Theory [Image].2013. Retrieved from http://usqstudydesk.usq.edu.au/m2/course/view.php?id=2922 Piaget, J. [Image]. 2011. Retrieved from http://www.nndb.com/people/359/000094077/

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