Collective Identity: Revision pt1

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  • For students print pages: 1-4, (6), 10,12,14,16,17,18,20-24For me print pages:
  • The exam is two hours so you have an hour to answer each question 1 in section A and 1 in section BTo revise for section B we need to make sure you can answer the 4 prompt questions and you know what collective group you’re talking about
  • "Identity is complicated. Everyone thinks they've got one…”Chicken or the egg? And the fact that people are not self aware of the impact that the media can have in shaping your identity, they way you see others and the way you see the world in generalSo do you really have an identity or is one appropriated (assumed) for you by the media? – apply that same question to our collective group“…collective identity [is] an individual's cognitive, moral, …”Although collective identity can be linked to culture and ethnicity it can be much wider than that – cognitive to do with the mind so therefore collective identity can be formed with a group of people who have the same mind-set – A PERCEPTION OF SHARED STATUSThere are many theories on identity and as students of media you have every right to add more – to theorise and hypothesise means to put forward a suggestion – but it must be backed up with some kind of research
  • DON’T PRINT THIS SLIDEThey need to describe the group, pretend it’s the start of the essay and before you do anything you need to make it clear who your collective group is – how are you going to describe them?
  • Does that make sense?What does the underlined text mean?Instigated by people like The Specials who felt that young black and white people ‘might discover common or parallel meanings in their blighted , post-industrial predicament’ (Paul Gilroy)
  • Does that make sense?What does the underlined text mean?Instigated by people like The Specials who felt that young black and white people ‘might discover common or parallel meanings in their blighted , post-industrial predicament’ (Paul Gilroy) at this time that group of young people were in charge of that identity, how it was shaped and how others viewed itIt would be hard to just call them ‘Urban youth’ because the media seem to control what Urban isBUT NOW – Do the contemporary youth have that same amount of control? Or is the shaping of their collective identity under significant media influence?It’s possible to refer to them as ‘urban youth’ as long as you make clear that this is YOUR definition of the word
  • Because there are going to be other schools which would have be taught other collective groups so it’s important that you make it clear who your are talking about
  • So we’re going to go through these prompt questions and see if we can answer them
  • What is the question asking of you?Representation is an constructionSo refer to your media forms film and music and compare how they construct (put across a representation of your collective group) – you should be able to comment on differences in their construction of the representation of your group and why that may exist.
  • You can do them at the same or do one then the other
  • You can do them at the same or do one then the other
  • You can do them at the same or do one then the other
  • You can do them at the same or do one then the other

Transcript

  • 1. REVISIONPART 1G325: Critical Perspectivesin Media1
  • 2. Media and Collective Identity• How do the contemporary mediarepresent nations, regions andethnic / social / collective groups ofpeople in different ways?• How does contemporaryrepresentation compare toprevious time periods?• What are the social implications ofdifferent media representations ofgroups of people?• To what extent is human identityincreasingly ‘mediated’?BLACK BRITISH COLLECTIVE IDENTITYKEY QUESTIONSWHAT DO YOU NEED FORTHE EXAM?• social group as a case study• at least two different media• understanding of andreference to theory/culturalcritics• your own voice!2
  • 3. "Identity is complicated. Everyone thinkstheyve got one…”David Gauntlett (2007).“…collective identity *is+ an individualscognitive, moral, and emotional connectionwith a community… It is a perception of ashared status or relation, which may beimagined rather than experienced directly, andit is distinct from personal identities, althoughit may form part of a personal identity.COLLECTIVE IDENTITY AND SOCIALMOVEMENTS. Annual Review ofSociology, January01, 2001, Polletta, Francesca; Jasper, James MDESCRIBE OUR COLLECTIVEGROUP Whoarethey?
  • 4. DESCRIBE OUR COLLECTIVEGROUP
  • 5. • When referring to black Britain, in contemporary terms, we’rereferring to a subcultural youth movement, which in its presentstate can be seen as a post-modern version of the collectivegroup black British. Originally black British referred to thoseimmigrants (with Caribbean and African heritage) who camefrom the Commonwealth countries to settle in Britain.• Due to syncretic processes the make-up of what is described asblack Britain has changed and evolved and therefore thisdescription can be challenged. What we now have is a post-modern subcultural youth movement – any young person whois part of this post-modern collective identity can be fromvarious ethnic backgrounds but the cultural materials - names,narratives, symbols, verbal styles, rituals, clothing, and so onthat they associate themselves with are strongly grounded inblack culture. This evolution in the first instance was instigatedby young white people and first generation born black British,but its continual evolution, and the way in which this group arerepresented could be said to have significant media influence.DESCRIBE OUR COLLECTIVEGROUP
  • 6. • When referring to black Britain, in contemporary terms, we’rereferring to a subcultural youth movement, which in its presentstate can be seen as a post-modern version of the collectivegroup black British. Originally black British referred to thoseimmigrants (with Caribbean and African heritage) who camefrom the Commonwealth countries to settle in Britain.• Due to syncretic processes the make-up of what is described asblack Britain has changed and evolved and therefore thisdescription can be challenged. What we now have is a post-modern subcultural youth movement – any young person whois part of this post-modern collective identity can be fromvarious ethnic backgrounds but the cultural materials - names,narratives, symbols, verbal styles, rituals, clothing, and so onthat they associate themselves with are strongly grounded inblack culture. This evolution in the first instance was instigatedby young white people and first generation born black British,but its continual evolution, and the way in which this group arerepresented could be said to have significant media influence.(Could we just call this group ‘Urban Youth’?)DESCRIBE OUR COLLECTIVEGROUP
  • 7. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO DESCRIBEOUR COLLECTIVE GROUP
  • 8. Breaking the questions down• How do the contemporary mediarepresent nations, regions andethnic / social / collective groups ofpeople in different ways?• How does contemporaryrepresentation compare toprevious time periods?• What are the social implications ofdifferent media representations ofgroups of people?• To what extent is human identityincreasingly ‘mediated’?BLACK BRITISH COLLECTIVE IDENTITYKEY QUESTIONSWHAT DO YOU NEED FORTHE EXAM?• social group as a case study• at least two different media• understanding of andreference to theory/culturalcritics• your own voice!8
  • 9. 1. How do thecontemporarymedia representnations, regionsand ethnic/social/ collectivegroups of peoplein different ways?Breaking the questions down
  • 10. 1. How do thecontemporarymedia representnations, regionsand ethnic/social/ collectivegroups of peoplein different ways?• The question is essentially askingyou to compare how differentcontemporary media construct(represent) your collective groupin different ways• Representation is an construction• So refer to your media forms; filmand music and compare how theyconstruct (put across arepresentation of your collectivegroup) – you should be able tocomment on differences in theirconstruction of the representationof your group and why that mayexist.Breaking the questions downESSAY STRUCTURE
  • 11. What can you say about themedia?• Describe the media and support what you saywith a quote
  • 12. What can you say about themedia?• The media are in the business of describing thingsto us. They represent people and types of peopleto us so that we end up feeling that we knowwhat they are like. We are often so used to this,that we take these kinds of representations forgranted. ‘…a significant body of research suggeststhat the media, as a key transmitter ofrepresentations and as a major source ofinformation within society, has the power tocontrol and shape attitudes and beliefs held inthe popular imagination.’ (Fatimah Awan)
  • 13. Introduce your collective group
  • 14. • This is something to take into consideration whenentering into a debate on how contemporary mediachoose to represent a collective group. The collectivegroup that I will be discussing is that of ‘black Britain’but the black Britain that I am going to discuss is a postmodern youth subculture. A collective of young peoplefrom different ethnic backgrounds who perceivethemselves to have a shared status in society. Theiridentity is expressed in cultural materials, symbols andverbal styles that are heavily rooted in black culture.When referring to ‘urban youth’ or ‘black Britian’throughout the essay this definition that I will be goingby.Introduce your collective group
  • 15. Introduce your media forms
  • 16. • Through film texts it’s quiet obvious to see howthis group of people have been stereotypicallyrepresented. This is seen thorough a saturation of‘urban youth films’ such as Kidulthood (Huda,2006), Adulthood (Clarke, 2008), Shank (Ali,2010) and Attack the Block (Cornish, 2011). All ofthese films portray a negative representation of‘urban youth’. All of the characters talk with avernacular that mixes patios with English and allbut one of the films are accompanied by a grimemusical soundtrack.Introduce your media forms
  • 17. • Provide textual examples that will back upwhat you have just said.• Making sure to link it back to ‘mediaconstruction’ and the portrayal of yourcollective group• If you can use quotes• Throw in an argument – why are these filmspopular over other films such as Freestyle(Lee, 2010)?Provide textual examples
  • 18. • Film texts and the proliferation of negativeimages that we seem to see of ‘urban youth’ canbe said to be under the hegemonic control of themedia. This means that in the case of ‘urbanyouth’ they are represented as feral, rebelliouscriminals. ‘The hegemonic model acknowledgesthat much of the media is controlled by arelatively small group of people (who aregenerally male, middle class and white) and thatthe viewpoints associated with these groupsinevitably become embedded in the productsthemselves.’ (Baker et, al)My mini argument
  • 19. Introduce your media forms
  • 20. • Music can be said to sometimes be anti-hegemonic. The music genre heavilyassociated with ‘urban youth’ is that of grime.‘Stylistically, grime takes from many genresincluding UK Garage, dancehall and hip-hop…lyrics of the songs incorporate not onlybiographical but socio- and politicalcommentary.’ The lyrics are delivered using across between British slang and Jamaicanpatois.Introduce your media forms
  • 21. • Grime music can be seen as a way of ‘urbanyouth’ taking back the power from the musicindustry. The meaning of grime to young peopletoday can be compared to the meaning of Ska toyoung people in the late 1970s. Both genres havelinks to reggae music and both genres have fansand producers from different ethnicities. Butrather than focusing on Bob Marley’s imperativesof black liberation they centre instead on the‘possibility that black and white young peoplemight discover common or parallel meanings’(Gilroy) in their predicament.Introduce your media forms
  • 22. • The ideologies of grime music remains intactwhen it remains in it’s organic form, but whenmarketed by the music industry it can begin toloose its meaning. Thus begin to represent ‘urbanyouth’ in a totally different way. The same thinghappened with reggae music in the early 1970s‘The gradual involvement of large corporations…in the selling of reggae stimulated importantchanges reflecting a conscious attempt toseparate the product from its producers and fromits roots in black life’ (Gilroy)Introduce your media forms
  • 23. • Provide textual examples that will back upwhat you have just said.• Discuss artists and their songs (Devlin, Prof.Green, Dizzee Rascal and Nu Dubz)• How do they represent ‘urban youth’ or not?• Has music industry got something to do withthe way they are represented?Provide textual examples
  • 24. • How do the contemporary media representcollective groups of people in different ways?• Film vs Music• Fair portrayals or not• How does this affect the way the world seesthem/ they see themselves• Throw in some personal commentaryConclude
  • 25. • Define the media and their role – use quotes• Introduce your collective group• Introduce your media form/s• Provide textual examples that address thequestion – use quotes• Introduce your media form/s• Provide textual examples that address thequestion – use quotes• If you can provide some argument• ConcludeRough Structure