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Introduction to the  OFO & QCTO
 

Introduction to the OFO & QCTO

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  • Does this thing QCTO totally replace SAQA or it complements it? Why are there so many quality bodies when if they were inculcated in the department as it is in other countries these things would be run more responsibly and to the test of time!! These so called section training authorities are sorely a problem to the development of education and yet education is the back bone of the development of any nation or peoples! Are these so called section training authorities in other countries? and where they are existent how are they performing? To take the nearest example of bogus Zimbabwe(the most dilapidated country,economy and everything in the world) actually no country exists in reality here, they are still producing better products amidst all this adverse situation compared to South Africa!! The question is why? The Department of education should research to find the answers and use them to stop bothering people with these authorities of yours that dont function. When you go away from bogus Zimbabwe to other African countries they are producing quality and competitively, why? With all the infrastructure we have, we are merely scapegoating all the time! Lets swallow our pride and do the right thing for the future generations to come; lets copy from our others other than pretending that we shall borrow from America or another far of country only to learn that it doesn't work for us. Thanku
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    Introduction to the  OFO & QCTO Introduction to the OFO & QCTO Presentation Transcript

    • Introduction: Organising Framework for Occupations (OFO) and Qualifications and Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)
    • ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS
      • ANZSCO Australian and new Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations
      • CEP Communities of Expert Practitioners
      • DoL Department of Labour
      • HEQC Higher Education Quality Committee
      • ISCO International Standard Classification of Occupations
      • NCPF National Career Path Framework
      • NQF National Qualifications Framework
      • NLRD National Learners’ Records Database
      • NSA National Skills Authority
      • NSDS National Skills Development Strategy
      • OFO Organising Framework for Occupations
      • OLS Occupational Learning System
      • OQF Occupational Qualifications Framework
      • QCTO Qualifications and Quality Council for Trades and Occupations
      • RPL Recognition of Prior Learning
      • SAQA South African Qualifications Authority
      • SASCO South African Standard Classification of Occupations
      • SETA Sector Education and Training Authority
      • SGB Standards Generating Body
    • The OFO - Outline
      • Why have an Organising Framework of Occupations
      • Where has this OFO come from
      • What is the OFO
      • How was the OFO designed
      • How do we use the OFO
      • What are the applications of the OFO
      • Qualifications and Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)
      Managers 1 Professionals 2 Technicians and Trades Workers 3 Community and Personal Service Workers 4 Clerical and Administrative Workers 5 Sales Workers 6 Machinery Operators and Drivers 7 Elementary Workers 8 OFO – Major Groups
    • Why have an OFO ?
      • Principal tool for having a common language for collecting and analysing labour market information
        • Defining needs and aligning strategies requires a common language to speak about and define occupations
        • Occupations can provide a link between SAQA learning fields and economic sectors responsible for identifying and addressing needs
      • International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO)
        • South Africa adopted ISCO used by StatsSA for all national reporting, Labour force and household surveys
      • 2000 – 2005 Employers, SETAs and DoL using SASCO for
        • WSPs and SSPs
        • Employment Equity reporting
    • Where has this OFO come from ?
      • By 2003 clear that SASCO does not provide
        • Detail SETAs require for good skills analysis, development planning and labour market interventions
        • Major groups and occupation titles no longer consistent with labour market
      • DoL initiates process to refine and coordinate collection of information on scarce and critical skills
        • International review reveals
          • Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and Statistics New Zealand initiate stakeholder-driven process with wide consultation – March 2001
          • Outcome: Updated classification system, the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) – finalised June 2006
      • From February 2005 started testing OFO
        • Refined over 3 consecutive years of SETA data collection processes and one cycle of HSRC verification process
      • Suggest Another 3 years to allow for stakeholder participation
    • What is the OFO ?
      • SYSTEM
      • A skills based, coded classification system
      • Captures all jobs in the form of occupations
      • Groups occupations based on similarity of -
        • skill specialisation and
        • skill level
        • into successively broader categories or hierarchical levels that can be used for varying statistical and analysis purposes
    • What is the OFO?
      • CONCEPTS
      • Occupation
        • Set of jobs that require the performance of similar or identical sets of tasks across a range of contexts
      • Skill Specialisation - defined in terms of
        • Range and complexity of the tasks
        • Field of knowledge required
        • Tools or equipment used
        • Materials worked on or information worked with
        • Goods or services provided
      • Skill level - determined by
        • Level or amount of formal education
        • Amount of previous experience in a related occupation
        • Amount of on-the-job training
        • required to competently perform the set of tasks required for that occupation
    • What is the OFO ?
      • STRUCTURE
      • Major groups (1) 8
      • Sub-Major (2) 43
      • Minor (3) 100
      • Unit Groups (4) 374
      • Occupations (6) 1233
      • Alternative titles &
      • Specialisations Numerous
      • Skills Levels 5
        • NOT a grading system
      Managers 1 Professionals 2 Technicians and Trades Workers 3 Community and Personal Service Workers 4 Clerical and Administrative Workers 5 Sales Workers 6 Machinery Operators and Drivers 7 Elementary Workers 8 OFO – Major Groups
    • Skills Levels 4, 3, 2, 1 Sales Workers 6 2 Machinery Operators and Drivers 7 2, 1 Elementary Workers 8 4, 3, 2, 1 Clerical and Administrative Workers 5 4, 3, 2, 1 Community and Personal Service Workers 4 4, 3 Technicians and Trades Workers 3 5 Professionals 2 5, 4 Managers 1 Skill level OFO Major Group
    • OFO DIAGRAMME
    • How was this OFO designed?
        • BOTTOM UP
      • Identify jobs
      • Cluster jobs based on similarity of
        • tasks or skills (skill specialisation) and
        • skill levels (combination of qualification, training + experience)
          • Into occupational titles
      • Cluster occupational titles into next level of hierarchy - unit groups (using same clustering principles)
      • Continue this clustering process into hierarchy of 5 levels
      • Codify clusters each level of the hierarchy
      • Provide descriptors at each level of the hierarchy
      • Capture tasks and skills used for classification
      • For each occupation identify –
        • similarities = alternative titles
        • differences = specialisation
    • OFO Levels Mechanical Engineering Trades Workers Metal Fitters and Machinists Automotive and Engineering Technicians and Trades Workers Technicians and Trades Workers 2 nd Digit 3 rd Digit 4 th Digit 5+6 th Digits Fitter (General) Computer Numeric Control Setter Diesel Mechanic Fitter-Machinist Fitter-Mechanic Plant Mechanic Maintenance Fitter Aircraft Machinist Automotive Machinist Metal Machine Setter Metal Turner Milling Machinist Radial Driller Sub-major Group Minor Group Unit Group Occupation 323 323201 3232 32 1 st Digit Major Group 3 Metal Machinist (First Class) 323204
    • How is the OFO used ?
      • TOP DOWN USING DESCRIPTORS
      • MAJOR GROUP LEVEL (1 st Digit)
        • I am an Accountant - A Manager ? / A Professional ?
      MANAGERS coordinate and direct functions of government, commercial, agricultural, industrial and non-profit enterprises and organisations, or departments or sections within them. Managers 1 Professionals 2 PROFESSIONALS perform analytical, conceptual and creative tasks through the application of theoretical knowledge and experience in the fields of the arts, media, business, design, engineering, physical and life sciences, transport, education, health, information and communication technology, the law, social science and social welfare
      • I mainly coordinate and not perform functions, so I am a Manager
    • Grouping by Descriptors: Sub-Major Group
      • What type of Manager am I ?
      12 Farm Managers 13 Specialist Managers Chief Executives, General Managers and Legislators 11 14 Events, Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers
      • I think I am a Specialist Manager
      SPECIALIST MANAGERS plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate special functions within organisations such as advertising and sales, financial, personnel, production and distribution, education, health and welfare, or ICT 
    • Grouping by Descriptors: Minor Group
      • What type of Specialist Manager am I ?
      132 Business Administration Managers 133 Construction, Distribution and Production / Operations Managers Advertising, Marketing and Sales Managers 131 134 Education, Health and Welfare Services Managers 135 Information and Communication Technology Managers 136 Small Business, Office, Programme and Project Managers
      • I think I am a Business Administration Manager
      BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MANAGERS plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate the corporate, financial, personnel, policy and planning activities and guidelines within an organisation 
    • Grouping by Descriptors: Unit Group
      • What type of Business Administration Manager am I ?
      1322 Finance Managers 1323 Human Resource Managers Corporate (Administration & Business) Services Managers 1321 1324 Policy and Planning Managers 1325 Research and Development Managers
      • I think I am a Finance Manager
      FINANCE MANAGERS plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate the financial and accounting activities within an organisation. 
    • Checking Tasks or Skills for Unit Group (Finance Managers)
      • Advising on investment strategies, sources of funds and the distribution of earnings
      • Assessing capital finance proposals and the financial status of operational projects
      • Coordinating the development, implementation and monitoring of accounting systems
      • Delivering long range profit forecasts, budgeting & financial reporting
      • Determining, implementing, monitoring, reviewing and evaluating budgetary and accounting strategies, policies and plans in consultation with other managers
      • Directing the preparation of financial reports summarising & forecasting the organisation's financial position such as income statements, balance sheets and analyses of future earnings and income
      • Ensuring compliance with financial legislation and standards
      • Providing financial information and interpreting the implications for business performance and funding needs
    • Grouping by Occupation
        • Account Systems Manager,
        • Budgeting Manager,
        • Chief Accountant,
        • Chief Financial Officer (CFO),
        • Finance Director,
        • Financial Administrator,
        • Financial Controller,
        • Foreign Exchange Manager,
        • Internal Revenue Controller,
        • Revenue Assessment Manager,
        • Revenue Fraud & Prosecutions Manager
      132201 Finance Manager Plans, organises, directs, controls and coordinates the financial and accounting activities within an organisation 
    • Grouping by Occupation & Comparing
        • Account Systems Manager,
        • Budgeting Manager,
        • Chief Accountant,
        • Chief Financial Officer (CFO),
        • Finance Director,
        • Financial Administrator,
        • Financial Controller,
        • Foreign Exchange Manager,
        • Internal Revenue Controller,
      132201 Finance Manager Plans, organises, directs, controls and coordinates the financial and accounting activities within an organisation 
        • Legal Accountant,
        • Bank Accountant,
        • Chartered Accountant,
        • Company Accountant,
        • Corporate Accountant,
        • Financial Analyst,
        • Public Accountant,
        • Treasury Accountant,
      221101 Accountant Plans and provides systems and services relating to the financial dealings of organisations and individuals, and advises on associated record-keeping and compliance requirements
    • What are the applications of the OFO ?
        • Core tool underpinning Department of Labour’s Employee Services System for SA
          • Chapter 4 of SETAs’ SSP (identification of scarce and critical skills)
          • Linking job-seekers to job opportunities
          • Capturing job-seeker information
          • Career guidance
          • Learnership Registration
        • Core tool for all Government Departments Workplace Skill Plans – through DPSA
        • Some SETAs develop their MIS systems around it
        • Core tool underpinning proposed National Career Path Framework
    • OCCUPATIONAL LEARNING SYSTEM Economy Society Occupational Learning System QUALITY CYCLE Impact assessment Programmes, interventions Flow of Skills Labour Market Flow of Information DoL OFO 1 2 3 4 5 8 7 6 Use Enterprises Workplaces SETAs NCPF QCTO NLRD SAQA Curriculum Framework CEPs Provider system Accredited Providers Approved Workplaces & CEPs SETAs Assess-ment
    • Establishment and focus of the QCTO
      • Joint Policy Statement makes provision for the establishment of the QCTO alongside the HEQC and Umalusi
      • Focus of the QCTO is to oversee the approaches to delivery and assessment for trades and occupational competence and work based learning
      • QCs will have executive authority for:
        • defining the structure and nature of national qualifications and recommend the criteria to the respective Ministers for approval as policy
        • qualifications design and standards generation by fit for purpose panels (CEPs) while guarding against unnecessary overlap and duplication
        • the quality assurance of qualifications, providers (including workplace learning sites) and learning achievements
    • Occupational Qualifications Framework – Policy
      • Definition of Occupational Qualifications
        • An occupational qualification represents a planned combination of learning outcomes which is intended to provide qualifying learners with the applied competence to practice an occupation and to provide a basis for further learning. Occupational qualifications, developed under the auspices of QCTO contain three components. These are a:
          • Knowledge component
          • Skills component
          • Work experience component
        • Occupational qualifications include trades and all qualifications currently developed through Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETA) driven or supported Standards Generating Bodies (SGB) processes
    • Purpose of the OQF
      • The OQF is an integral component of the (NQF)
      • The purpose is to structure qualifications which are designed to address labour market needs. The labour market includes both the economy and the social development sector.
      • The OQF provides for:
        • Occupational qualifications;
        • Certification of meaningful skills sets related to occupations; and
        • Minimum access requirements for occupational qualifications
      • The new framework is intended to achieve:
        • Clear articulation with labour market needs – the labour market being understood to include both the economic sector as well the social development sector.; and
        • Clear articulation with qualifications in the General and Further Education and Training Qualifications Framework (GFETQF) and the Higher Education Qualifications Framework (HEQF).
    • OQF against 10-level NQF and other QFs
    • Occupational Qualifications Framework UMALUSI HEQC OQF National Occupational Certificates National Skills Certificates National Occupational Access Certificates (Language) (Mathematics) Level 1 Level 3 Level 2 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6 Level 7 Level 8 Level 9 Level 10
    • What is the National Career Path Framework? – Tool for QCTO
      • Not an alternative to the NQF - meant to strengthen the implementation of the NQF
      • Based on the Organising Framework for Occupations (OFO) of the DoL
      • Integral part of Occupational Learning System (OLS) as the Management and Information Framework of the QCTO to implement the Occupational Qualifications Framework (OQF)
    • The structure of the NCPF
      • Clusters occupations across the OFO Major Groups to reflect occupational progression and articulation pathways based on:
        • Similar purpose,
        • Similar learning requirements, i.e.
          • similar skills sets and
          • similar theoretical knowledge
      • into occupational families and occupational clusters
      • The purpose for structuring the OFO in this way is to manage and guide the:
        • Establishment of CEPs
        • Development of occupational qualifications and standards
        • Development of curriculum for occupational qualifications
        • Quality assurance of learning and learning achievements related to trades and occupations
        • The provision of occupational information in a commonly understood framework
    • The proposed occupational clusters in the NCPF
      • 1. Accommodation, Cleaning and Food Preparation related occupations
      • 2. Arts and Design related occupations
      • 3. Business Administration, Management, Information and Human Resources related occupations
      • 4. Electro technology and Telecommunications related occupations
      • 5. Extraction, Construction, Demolition and Civil Engineering related occupations
      • 6. Farming, Horticulture, Nature Conservation, Environment and related Science occupations
      • 7. Financial and Insurance related occupations
      • 8. Installation, Maintenance and Repair related occupations
      • 9. Medical, Social and Welfare related occupations
      • 10. Production related occupations
      • 11. Sales and Marketing related occupations
      • 12. Security and Law related occupations
      • 13. Teaching and Training related occupations
      • 14. Transportation and Materials Moving related occupations
    • The conceptual mapping of the role and functions of the NCPF OFO Major 8 Sub-major Group 43 Minor Group 108 Unit Group 406 Occupation 1321 S A Q A N L R D 2 unit groups 4 unit groups 3 unit groups 1 unit group 1 MANAGERS + + + + + - 2 PROFESSIONAL 3 TECHNICIANS 4 COMMUNITY 5 CLERICAL 6 SALES 7 OPERATORS 8 LABOURERS + + 61 Sales Representatives 62 Sales Assistants 63 Sales Support + + + FIELD 01 FIELD 05 FIELD 02 FIELD 03 FIELD 04 FIELD 06 FIELD 07 FIELD 08 FIELD 09 FIELD 10 FIELD 11 FIELD 12 OC 01 OC 05 OC 02 OC 03 OC 04 OC 06 OC 07 OC 08 OC 09 OC 10 OC 11 OC 12 OC 13 OC 14
    • CEPs Curricula Final assessment for occupational competence Quality Assurance Occupational cluster
    • Benefits of NCPF : Qualifications development
      • Eliminating duplication and overlaps in the development of occupational qualifications
      • Providing guidance for the coherent development of occupational qualifications by:
        • Building on the roles, skills and tasks that describe the relevant occupational group in the OFO
        • Identifying commonalities and overlaps in skills knowledge and learning requirements for groups of occupations and across occupations
        • Ensuring links to trades and occupations recognised internationally.
    • Benefits of NCPF : Quality Assurance Processes
      • Providing curricula to guide
        • development of context-specific curricula
        • programmes (learnerships, apprenticeships and skills programmes)
        • simplifying the task of programme approval
      • Providing assessment guidelines for providers and workplace learning sites,
        • help them to standardise their approach to the assessment & moderation of learner achievements in a variety of contexts and across economic sectors
      • Improving the ability of the QCTO and of SETAs to evaluate the impact of learning interventions and programmes
      • Address Scarce and Critical Skill shortages (funding, focussed energy)
    • Skills Development and Planning – what is the challenge? ORGANISATION’S FUNCTION Various Structures’ Functions Occupations Occupations Occupations Occupations Occupations Posts Posts Posts Posts Posts Posts Posts Posts Posts Various Structures’ Functions People People People People People People People People People Competence Profile: Terminology/System that promotes ability to monitor and enhance competence. Competence Elements : Experience Qualifications/Workplace Learning Knowledge; Skills; Attitude Professional Registration Physical Ability/Requirements G A P S O L V E CHALLENGE CHALLENGE OFO OFO
    • LEVEL 5: OCCUPATION LEVEL 4: UNIT LEVEL 3: MINOR LEVEL 2: SUB-MAJOR LEVEL 1: MAJOR 2 PROFESSIONALS 21 Arts and Media Professionals 22 Business, Human Resource and Marketing Professionals 23 Design, Engineering, Science and Transport Professionals 24 Education Professionals 231 Air and Marine Transport Professionals 232 Architects, Designers, Planners and Surveyors 233 Engineering Professionals 234 Natural and Physical Science Professionals 2341 Agricultural and Forestry Scientists 2342 Chemists, and Food and Wine Scientists 2343 Environmental Scientists 2344 Geologists and Geophysicists 234301 Conservation Officer 234302 Environmental Consultant 234303 Environmental Research Scientist 234304 Park Ranger
    • LEVEL 5: OCCUPATION LEVEL 4: UNIT LEVEL 3: MINOR LEVEL 2: SUB-MAJOR LEVEL 1: MAJOR EXPERIENCE defined at any level 2 PROFESSIONALS 21 Arts and Media Professionals 22 Business, Human Resource and Marketing Professionals 23 Design, Engineering, Science and Transport Professionals 24 Education Professionals 231 Air and Marine Transport Professionals 232 Architects, Designers, Planners and Surveyors 233 Engineering Professionals 234 Natural and Physical Science Professionals 2341 Agricultural and Forestry Scientists 2342 Chemists, and Food and Wine Scientists 2343 Environmental Scientists 2344 Geologists and Geophysicists 234301 Conservation Officer 234302 Environmental Consultant 234303 Environmental Research Scientist 234304 Park Ranger
    • LEVEL 5: OCCUPATION LEVEL 4: UNIT LEVEL 3: MINOR LEVEL 2: SUB-MAJOR LEVEL 1: MAJOR 2 PROFESSIONALS 21 Arts and Media Professionals 22 Business, Human Resource and Marketing Professionals 23 Design, Engineering, Science and Transport Professionals 24 Education Professionals 231 Air and Marine Transport Professionals 232 Architects, Designers, Planners and Surveyors 233 Engineering Professionals 234 Natural and Physical Science Professionals 2341 Agricultural and Forestry Scientists 2342 Chemists, and Food and Wine Scientists 2343 Environmental Scientists 2344 Geologists and Geophysicists 234301 Conservation Officer 234302 Environmental Consultant 234303 Environmental Research Scientist 234304 Park Ranger EXPERIENCE defined at any level
    • Occupation Profile Deputy Director Skills: Analytical Knowledge: Business Plan Qualifications: Nat Dip: HRM Professional Registrations: RHRP Physical Ability: No Restriction Experience: 5 years in field of exp Deputy Director: Enviro Managem Skills: Analytical Knowledge: Depart Business Plan Qualifications: Nat Dip: HRM Professional Registrations: RHRP Physical Ability: No Restriction Experience: 5 years Enviro M Mr Joe Soap Skills: Analytical Knowledge: Depart Business Plan Qualifications: Degree: H Science Professional Registrations: RHRP Physical Ability: Sight Disability Experience: 7 years Enviro M Job / Post Profile Expert Advanced Basic Working PDP Training and Development Plan WSP & ATR
    • Suggested Road Ahead
      • Focus OFO AND QCTO
      • Establish Communities of Expert Practitioners – based on present Chambers
      • Identify UNIQUE occupations
      • Define competence profile for unique occupations
      • Obtain confirmation from stakeholders
      • Reference Data for Scarce & Critical Skills list
      • Link to career path
      • Link to learning path
      • Define learning – institution/workplace
      • Inform Labour Market – clear need and how to address – workplace/provider learning
    •