Educ 6706 literate environment presentation
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EDUC 6706 Presentation

EDUC 6706 Presentation

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    Educ 6706 literate environment presentation Educ 6706 literate environment presentation Presentation Transcript

    • Rebekah ComptonWalden University EDUC 6706
    • What is a LiterateEnvironment? A literate environment is a community of learners, comprised of teachers and students, that work together to strengthen literacy skills. According to Angelillo (2008), “Together students and their teacher create their classroom community, and the type of community they create strongly influences the learning that takes place” (as cited by Tompkins, 2009, p. 16).
    • Why is a Literate EnvironmentImportant? A literate environment is important for teachers and students alike because it supports individualized instruction that is much needed in the classroom. To create this type of environment, teachers must focus on the learners, texts, and instructional practices they choose (Laureate Education, Inc., 2009b).
    • How is a Literate EnvironmentCreated? Getting to Know the  Creating and Literacy Learners implementing lessons based on student needs Assessing students and interests through cognitive and non-cognitive  Promoting critical assessments to thinking and student determine strengths, response to various weaknesses, interests texts and motivations Selecting engaging,  Supporting students in level appropriate texts becoming metacognitive learners
    • Framework for Literacy Instruction Learners Texts Instructional Practices Affective and cognitive aspects Text structures, types, genres, Developmentally appropriate of literacy learning and difficulty levels matched to research-based practices used literacy learners and literacy with appropriate texts to goals and objectives facilitate affective and cognitive aspects of literacy development in all learnersInteractive Perspective Use a variety of informal and Determine texts of the Use instructional methods thatReading and writing formal assessments to appropriate types and levels of address the cognitive andaccurately, fluently, and with determine areas of strength difficulty to meet literacy goals affective needs of students andcomprehension and need in literacy and objectives for students. the demands of the particularBeing strategic and development. text.metacognitive readers and Promote students’ independentwriters use of reading strategies and skills.Critical Perspective Find out about ideas, issues, Select texts that provide Foster a critical stance byJudging, evaluating, and and problems that matter to opportunities for students to teaching students how tothinking critically about text students. judge, evaluate, and think judge, evaluate, and think Understand the learner as a critically. critically about texts. unique individual.Response Perspective Find out about students’ Select texts that connect to Provide opportunities forReading, reacting, and interests and identities. students’ identities and/or students to read, react, andresponding to text in a variety Understand what matters to interests and that have the formulate a personal responseof meaningful ways students and who they are as potential to evoke an emotional to text. individuals. or personal response. (Walden University, 2011).
    • Getting to Know your LiteracyLearners. Before planning lessons, it is critical for teachers to know their students, not only on an academic level, but a personal level as well. Teachers must analyze information received from cognitive and non-cognitive assessments to create lessons that will best meet each student’s needs. Through assessing and analyzing, I was able to address the needs of my students, while planning for their interests and motivations.• “Understanding how students • “When the teachers see clear learn, and particularly how they areas of interest there is the learn to read and write, opportunity to gather resources influences the instructional to try to meet individual approaches that teachers use” students’ needs within a (Tompkins, 2010, p. 5). context that is already motivating and interesting to the student” (Afflerbach, 2007, p. 162).
    • Getting to Know your LiteracyLearner Example of cognitive  Example of non-cognitive assessment: AIMSweb assessment: Elementary Reading Curriculum Based Reading Attitude Survey: Measurement:
    • Creating Textual Arrangements-Selecting Engaging Texts The goal for creating an appropriate textual arrangement is selecting engaging texts based on the needs of each individual student (Laureate Education, Inc., 2009a).• Selecting engaging and • Textual arrangements appropriate texts helped me to create and improve my are an excellent tool for literate environment. teachers to use to Through focusing on enhance and build student needs and interests, I was able to locate texts that student knowledge on a were level appropriate but topic (Laureate held student interest. The Education, Inc., 2009f). texts were successful in building student’s knowledge of certain topics.
    • Framework for SelectingTexts Dr. Hartman provides a literacy matrix that assists teachers in selecting appropriate texts based on their student’s needs. Dr. Almasi extends the matrix by adding text difficulty. Text Difficulty Concerns:  Readability  Concept Density  Text Length  Structure  Font Size  Visualizations
    • Textual Arrangement The textual arrangement I created was based on a story from the reading basal series. The story A Weed is a Flower: The Story of George Washington Carver, served as the basis of the arrangement. The students showed interest in reading nonfiction texts, so I expanded the arrangement based on student interest. The remaining texts addressed were nonfiction or realistic fiction.
    • Online Texts Technology is changing and shaping the classroom everyday. To address these technological advances, teachers must teach students how to become literate through using technology.• “The Internet is • The online text I used in my textual arrangement was a rapidly changing what media text. Through accessing it means to be multiple forms of texts, literate” (Tompkins, teachers will insure that students are gaining multiple 2010, p. 7). enhancing experiences. The online text can be located at: http://video.nationalgeographic. com/video/news/history- archaeology-news/mlk-day-vin/.
    • Interactive Perspective Learners Texts Instructional Practices Affective and cognitive Text structures, types, Developmentally aspects of literacy genres, and difficulty appropriate research- learning levels matched to based practices used literacy learners and with appropriate texts literacy goals and to facilitate affective objectives and cognitive aspects of literacy development in all learnersInteractive Perspective Use a variety of informal Determine texts of the Use instructionalReading and writing and formal assessments appropriate types and methods that addressaccurately, fluently, and to determine areas of levels of difficulty to the cognitive andwith comprehension strength and need in meet literacy goals and affective needs ofBeing strategic and literacy development. objectives for students. students and themetacognitive readers demands of theand writers particular text. Promote students’ independent use of reading strategies and skills.(Walden University, 2011)
    • Interactive Perspective The Interactive Perspective of teaching focuses on teaching students multiple strategies for reading. More importantly, this perspective teaches students to be metacognitive about the strategies they are using. Being metacognitive about reading means knowing that some strategies work well with certain texts and being able to choose the correct strategies based on the text(Laureate Education, Inc., 2009e).
    • Interactive PerspectiveInstructional Practices To incorporate the  Try these other interactive perspective interactive into my teaching, I instructional practices: used a KWL chart. The students used the  Book Talks KWL chart to activate  Guided Reading their prior knowledge.  Interactive Writing After completing the  Making Words charts, the students  Minilessons were not only ready  Think-Alouds for the lesson, but  Word Ladders they were excited to begin as well. ○ (Tompkins, 2010)
    • Critical Perspective Learners Texts Instructional Practices Affective and cognitive Text structures, types, Developmentally aspects of literacy genres, and difficulty appropriate research- learning levels matched to based practices used literacy learners and with appropriate texts literacy goals and to facilitate affective objectives and cognitive aspects of literacy development in all learnersCritical Perspective Find out about ideas, Select texts that provide Foster a critical stance byJudging, evaluating, and issues, and problems that opportunities for students teaching students how tothinking critically about matter to students. to judge, evaluate, and judge, evaluate, and thinktext Understand the learner as think critically. critically about texts. a unique individual. (Walden University, 2011)
    • Critical Perspective The goal for the critical perspective is to provide students with an opportunity to think deeply about what they are reading. Students using this perspective use skills such as evaluating, analyzing, and making judgments (Laureate Education, 2009c).
    • Critical PerspectiveInstructional Practices To incorporate the  Try these other critical critical perspective instructional practices: into my teaching, I  Double-Entry Journals used Questioning the  Open-Mind Portraits Author. Questioning  Question/Answer the Author promotes Relationships critical thinking by  Questioning the having students Author analyze the text to  Reciprocal determine the author’s Questioning purpose for writing.  (Tompkins, 2010).
    • Response Perspective Learners Texts Instructional Practices Affective and cognitive Text structures, types, Developmentally aspects of literacy genres, and difficulty appropriate research- learning levels matched to based practices used literacy learners and with appropriate texts literacy goals and to facilitate affective objectives and cognitive aspects of literacy development in all learnersResponse Perspective Find out about students’ Select texts that connect Provide opportunities forReading, reacting, and interests and identities. to students’ identities students to read, react,responding to text in a Understand what matters and/or interests and that and formulate a personalvariety of meaningful ways to students and who they have the potential to response to text. are as individuals. evoke an emotional or personal response. (Walden University, 2011)
    • Response Perspective The response perspective focuses on providing literacy experiences based on the teacher’s knowledge of the individual student. Teacher’s must provide literacy experiences that relate to students’ interests and reading levels (Laureate Education Inc., 2009d).
    • Response PerspectiveInstructional Practices To incorporate the  Try these response response perspective in instructional practices: my teaching, I had  Reading Logs students complete an  Double-Entry Journals Elementary Reading  Grand Conversations Attitude Survey. After  Learning Logs reviewing the results, I  Quickwriting planned a lesson based ○ (Tompkins, 2010) on the students’ needs and levels.
    • References Afflerbach, P. (2007). Understanding and using reading assessment, K–12. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Laureate Education, Inc. (2009a). Analyzing and Selecting Texts [Webcast]. The beginning reading, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author. Laureate Education, Inc. (2009b). Changes in Literacy Education. [Webcast]. The beginning reader, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author. Laureate Education, Inc. (2009c). Critical Perspective. [Webcast] The beginning reader, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author. Laureate Education, Inc. (2009d). Response Perspective. [Webcast]. The beginning reader, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author. Laureate Education, Inc. (2009e). Strategic Processing. [Webcast] The beginning reader, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author. Laureate Education, Inc. (2009f). Textual Arrangements. [Webcast] The developing reader, 4-6 grades. Baltimore, MD: Author. Tompkins, G. E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach (5th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Walden University. (2011). Framework for literacy instruction. Minneapolis, MN: Author.