CULTURAL STUDIES                                          SS 330.01 & .02                       DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIEN...
_______________________________________________________________________                                          COURSE OF...
Essays. New York: Verso. (1980) 2005. 170-195E.P. Thompson. “Agenda for a Radical History.” from Making History: Writings ...
Raymond Williams. 1997. “The Future of Cultural Studies” in John Storey, What is Cultural        Studies? New York: Arnold...
be drawn from these and other sources that will be noted in the course lectures.Required Texts:Raymond Williams. (1976) 19...
Michael Wood Hitler’s Search for the Holy Grail.CasablancaStuart Hall lecture: Representation and the MediaDebate between ...
SYLLABUS ATTACHMENTSACADEMIC INTEGRITYPratt Institute considers Academic Integrity highly important. Instances of cheating...
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  1. 1. CULTURAL STUDIES SS 330.01 & .02 DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCE & CULTURAL STUDIES PRATT INSTITUTE SPRING 2010 MEETINGS & ROOMS: SECTION ONE: NORTH HALL ROOM 112 THURSDAY 9:30-12:20PM SECTION TWO: NORTH HALL ROOM 110 WEDNESDAY 9:30-12:20PMPROFESSOR: B. RICARDO BROWN, PH.D.ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CULTURAL STUDIESOFFICE: DEKALB 419HOURS: TBA PHONE: 1.718.636.3533EMAIL: BRBROWNIII@EARTHLINK.NETURL: HTTP://NODE801.ORGBLOG: HTTP://NODE801.BLOGSPOT.COMSS-330 CULTURAL STUDIESThis course explores the relations of cultural artifacts in the contemporary world to their varioussocial contexts. Culture is understood as the material expressions and images that people createand the social environment that shapes the way diverse groups of people experience their worldand interact with one another. The course focuses on the critical analysis of these various formsof media, design, mass communications, arts, and popular culture.COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVESThe present era has been characterized as an age of global integration and the age of a true worldeconomy. In the midst of these changes we can often hear “culture” invoked as both anexpression of this globalism and in opposition to it. Culture is not a new idea, and its fullmeaning remains a topic of fierce debate. Indeed, we can find a range of conflicting viewsregarding the meaning and role of “culture.” The use of “culture” is not limited to any one part ofthe ideological spectrum, especially when used as a political weapon, as a rallying point foridentity, and as the artifacts and practices that must be either preserved or destroyed.Cultural Studies emerged from the attempts to understand the social complexity and politicaluses of “culture” to debates over “high & low” art, the value of the artifacts of popular culture(television, music, etc.), or the investigation of authority and power in the social relations ofeveryday life, Cultural Studies examined and intervened in some of the most pressing issues ofits day. Your course of study will explore these interventions as moments in the genealogy ofCultural Studies. We will examine how Cultural Studies offered a critical understanding of whatMax Horkheimer termed “life as it is lived.” Finally, attention will be paid to the fate of CulturalStudies as it became accepted and co-opted by various academic disciplines, with specialattention to the reception of Cultural Studies in the United States.This course is designed to give you a strong foundation in the historical setting and the variationsin Cultural Studies. You are no expected to already know this, nor are you expected to alreadybe familiar with some of the texts we will use and issues that will be raised. If you will finish thecourse with an understanding that there are different ways of understanding the history of thepresent day and its culture of everyday life. Cultural Studies (SS 330.01-.02), Pratt Institute, Spring 2010
  2. 2. _______________________________________________________________________ COURSE OF STUDYSESSION ONE: INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSETHE DISJUNCTURES OF THE 20 CENTURY & THE ORIGINS OF CULTURAL STUDIES THDegenerate ArtSESSION TWO: ENLIGHTENMENTImmanuel Kant. “What is Enlightenment?” http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/kant-whatis.htmlDebate between Michel Foucault and Noam Chomsky (1971) http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1634494870703391080#Michael Wood Hitlers Search for the Holy Grail (the Ahneneber)Raymond Williams. Civilization, 57-60; History, 146-148; Humanity, 148-151; Individual 161- 165; Western, 333-334. from Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society.SESSION THREE: THE END OF ENLIGHTENMENTMax Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno Dialectic of Enlightenment, “The Culture Industry:Enlightenment as Mass Deception,” 129-167.In Our Time --- The Frankfurt School (podcast) http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/inourtime/inourtime_20100114.shtmlMichel Foucault “What is Enlightenment?” http://foucault.info/documents/whatIsEnlightenment/foucault.whatIsEnlightenment.en.htmlJorge Luis Borges “Pierre Menard, Author of Don Quixote”In Our Time --- Borges (podcast) http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/inourtime/inourtime_20070104.shtmlUmberto Eco “Casablanca” from Travels in Hyper-Reality.Casablanca (1942), part ISESSION FOUR: DEFINING “THE POSTMODERN” AND POPULAR CULTURECasablanca (1942), part IIUmberto Eco “Casablanca” from Travels in Hyper-Reality.Jean-Francois Lyotard “Defining the Postmodern” in During, 142-145.Jorge Luis Borges “Pierre Menard, Author of Don Quixote”In Our Time --- Borges (podcast) http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/inourtime/inourtime_20070104.shtmlSESSION FIVE: BRITISH CULTURAL STUDIESStuart Hall Video Lecture Representation and the Media.Stuart Hall in During, “Encoding, decoding,” in During, 507-517.Dick Hebdige in During, “The Function of Subculture,” in During, 441-450.SESSION SIX: BRITISH CULTURAL STUDIESRaymond Williams Art, 40-42; Culture, 87-92; Criticism, 84-86; Hegemony, 144-146; Ideology, 152-158; Intellectual, 169-171; Society, 291-295; Sociology, 295-296. from Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society. Revised edition. New York: Oxford University Press. (1976) 1983.Raymond Williams. “Advertising: the Magic System” from Culture and Materialism: Selected Cultural Studies (SS 330.01-.02), Pratt Institute, Spring 2010
  3. 3. Essays. New York: Verso. (1980) 2005. 170-195E.P. Thompson. “Agenda for a Radical History.” from Making History: Writings on History and Culture. New York: New Press. 1994. 358-364.Stanley Aronowitz, “British Cultural Studies,” 108-130.SESSION SEVEN: THE AMERICAN RECEPTIONOConner, Alan. “The Problem of American Cultural Studies” in John Storey, What is Cultural Studies? New York: Arnold/St. Martins Press. 1997. 187-196.Pfister, Joel. “The Americanization of Cultural Studies.” in Storey, 287-299.Stanley Aronowitz, “Cultural Study in Postmodern America,” from Roll Over Beethoven, 167-202.SESSION EIGHT: THE AMERICAN RECEPTION---- POLITICS AND IDENTITYJohn d’Emillio “Capitalism and Gay Identity.” from Powers of Desire: The Politics of Sexuality. Ann Snitow, Christine Stansell, & Sharan Thompson, eds. 1983. New York: Monthly Review Press.Cornel West in During, “The New Cultural Politics of Difference,”in During 203-220.Stuart Hall “What is this ‘Black’ in Black Popular Culture?” Social Justice, Vol. 20, nos 1-2. 104-114.bell hooks “A Revolution in Values: the Promise of Multicultural Change,” in During, 233- 240.SESSION NINE: CULTURAL STUDIES AND THE STUDY OF POPULAR CULTUREJohn Storey. 1996. Cultural Studies and the Study of Popular Culture: Theories & Methods. Chapters 1,3,5, and 7.SESSION ELEVEN: TOWARDS A SOCIETY OF CONTROLMax Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno, “Juliette or Enlightenment and Morality” 81-119.The Trial. Directed by Orson Wells.Franz Kafka “In the Penal Colony” from The Penal Colony.SESSION TWELVE: TOWARDS A SOCIETY OF CONTROLBrazilHerbert Marcuse “New Forms of Control” from One Dimensional Man, 1-19.Gilles Deleuze “Postscript on Control Societies.” from Negotiations. New York: Columbia University Press.SESSION THIRTEEN: POWER AND INTELLECTUALSMichel Foucault, “Space, Power and Knowledge,” in During, 134-141.Gilles Deleuze and Michel Foucault “On Intellectuals.”Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari “Politics.” from Negotiations.Debate between Michel Foucault and Noam Chomsky (1971).SESSION FOURTEEN: CULTURAL STUDIES AND ITS LEGACIESHerbert Marcuse and Theodor Adorno: Exchange on popular protest and the student movement Cultural Studies (SS 330.01-.02), Pratt Institute, Spring 2010
  4. 4. Raymond Williams. 1997. “The Future of Cultural Studies” in John Storey, What is Cultural Studies? New York: Arnold/St. Martins Press. 168-177.Stuart Hall. 1997. “Race Culture, and Communications: looking backward and forward at Cultural Studies” in John Storey, What is Cultural Studies? New York: Arnold/St. Martins Press. 336-343.Stuart Hall “Cultural Studies and its Theoretical Legacies” in During, 97-112.FINAL SESSION: CULTURAL STUDIES AND ITS LEGACIES AT PRATT INSTITUTEEssays by Pratt Faculty including: Professors Ivan Zatz, Lisabeth During, May Joseph, JonBeller, Suzanne Verderber, Michael Eng, Miriam Greenberg, etc.B. Ricardo Brown. 2007. “A City Without Walls: Notes on Terror and Counter-Terrorism.” Situations: Project of the Radical Imagination, Spring, Vol. 2, no. 1.____________________________________COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURESFocused Writing assignmentsThese will be short in class essays that will serve as the basis for discussions. You will be given10 minutes to write a comment on a topic chosen from the reading for that session.In addition, you will add each comment to the LMS forum for the course. This will serve as ameans for those who did not get to make their comment in class and as an archive of earliercomments that will be accessible to everyone in the course.Final EssayOne 10 page essay will be required at the end of the semester. The topic will be given before thefinal class. Essays are due one week after the last class.Absences and LatenessPersistent absences or lateness will result in a reduction of your final grade consistent with thepolicies of the university and of the department of Social Science & Cultural StudiesGrades and IncompletesFocused writings/postings to the LMS forum, participation, and the final essay will eachcomprise 1/3 (33%) of your final grade. All focused writing assignments must be distributed tothe forum to be counted as completed.An incomplete will be granted only in accordance with the established policy of the university.An incomplete is “available only if the student has been in regular attendance, has satisfied allbut the final requirements of the course, and has furnished satisfactory proof that the work wasnot completed because of illness or other circumstances beyond control” (Pratt InstituteBulletin). If you do not turn in your final work on time, and you do not have an approvedincomplete, you will fail the course. ________________________________________________________________________ READINGSMost of the readings will be available through the LMS site for the course (at my.pratt.edu) .The exceptions are the two required texts by Williams and Storey. The reading for the class will Cultural Studies (SS 330.01-.02), Pratt Institute, Spring 2010
  5. 5. be drawn from these and other sources that will be noted in the course lectures.Required Texts:Raymond Williams. (1976) 1985. Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society. Revisededition. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN-10: 0195204697; ISBN-13: 978-0195204698.John Storey. 2003. Cultural Studies and the Study of Popular Culture: Theories and MethodsUniversity of Georgia Press; Second edition. ISBN-10: 082032566X; ISBN-13: 978-0820325668.It is highly recommended that you also purchase:Simon During, ed. 1999. The Cultural Studies Reader. 2nd edition. Routledge; ISBN:0415137543. ON LIBRARY RESERVEMax Horkheimer, Theodor Adorno edited by Gunzelin Schmid Noerr, translated by EdmundJephcott. 2002. Dialectic of Enlightenment: Philosophical Fragments. Stanford UniversityPress. ISBN: 0804736332. NOT THE OLDER TRANSLATION PUBLISHED BYCONTINUUM. ON LIBRARY RESERVEJorge Luis Borges. 1989. Ficciones. Anthony Kerrigan (Editor), Anthony Bonner (Translator).Grove Press; ISBN: 0802130305;Stanley Aronowitz. 1993. Roll over Beethoven: The Return of Cultural Strife. WesleyanUniversity Press. ISBN: 0819562629. ON LIBRARY RESERVECary Nelson and Lawrence Grossberg, eds. 1988. Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture.University of Illinois Press. ISBN-10: 0252014014; ISBN-13: 978-0252014017.John Storey, ed. 1997. What is Cultural Studies? A Reader. New York: Arnold/St. MartinsPress. 1997. ISBN-10: 0340652403; ISBN-13: 978-0340652404 .Michel Foucault. 1973. The Order of Things: A History of the Human Sciences. New York:Vintage. ASIN: B000HZIHD0Andrew Arato and Eike Gebhardt, eds. 1982. The Essential Frankfurt School Reader. NewYork: Continuum.Raymond Williams. Materialism and Culture. New York: Verso. ISBN-10: 1844670600ISBN-13: 978-1844670604.Karl Marx. 1956. The Holy Family or the Critique of Critical Criticism. New York: ForeignLanguages Publishing House. ASIN: B0007FGREQ__________________SELECTED DOCUMENTARIES, FILMS, AND MUSIC TO BE USED DURING THE COURSE THESE WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE IN CLASS OR ON THE LMSDegenerate Art Exhibit documentary. Cultural Studies (SS 330.01-.02), Pratt Institute, Spring 2010
  6. 6. Michael Wood Hitler’s Search for the Holy Grail.CasablancaStuart Hall lecture: Representation and the MediaDebate between Noam Chomsky and Michel Foucaultbell hooks interview: Cultural Criticism & Transformation.Committee for a Free Congress History of Political CorrectnessMarcuses HippopotamusThe Trial (Orson Wells version)MetropolisBrazilDr. StrangeloveArnold Schoenberg Pierrot lunaireAlban Berg Seven Early SongsAnton Webern Two Songs; Variations for Piano; Five Movements for String Quartet; arrangement of Bachs Musical Offering; Quartet for violin, clarinet, tenor sax and pianoJohn Cage “She is Asleep” duet for voice and prepared piano; As Slow as Possible; Music for Prepared PianoCharles Ives SongsHenry Cowell AdvertisementSteve Reich Octet; Nagoya Marimba; Music for 18 MusiciansDagmar Krause Songs of Kurt Weill and Tank Battles: Songs of Hans EislerCarla Bley Musique MachaniqueWilliam S. Burroughs No More Stalins, No More Hitlers (with John Cale)Sidney Bechet High SocietyLoius Armstrong & King Oliver Canal Street BluesDizzy Gillespie & Charlie Parker BebopThe Ornette Coleman Double Quartet Free JazzJohn Coltrane My Favorite Things (live)Thelonious Monk & John Coltrane Off MinorSkeleton Crew (Fred Frith & Tom Cora) Were Still FreeRobert Fripp Frippertronics Improvisation live at the World Financial Center, Nov. 2000Astor Piazzolla musical settings of some poems of Jorge Luis BorgesSuggested sources for purchasing the readings:St. Marks Bookshop http://www.stmarksbookshop.comThe Strand www.strandbooks.com – the huge second-hand store on 12th Street & Broadway.Book Culture Broadway and 114th Street http://www.bookculture.com/The Advanced Book Exchange www.abebooks.comBarnes and Nobles www.bn.comAmazon http://www.amazon.com Cultural Studies (SS 330.01-.02), Pratt Institute, Spring 2010
  7. 7. SYLLABUS ATTACHMENTSACADEMIC INTEGRITYPratt Institute considers Academic Integrity highly important. Instances of cheating, plagiarism, andwrongful use of intellectual property will not be tolerated. • Faculty members will report each incident to the registrar for inclusion in students’ files. ·More than one report to the registrar during a student’s program of study at Pratt will result in a hearing before the Academic Integrity Board, at which time appropriate sanctions will be decided. These may include dismissal from the Institute. ·The nature and severity of the infraction will be determined by faculty members who can: ask students to repeat an assignment, fail students on the assignment, fail students in the course and/or refer the incident to the Academic Integrity Board.For more details about these procedures please see the Pratt Student Handbook, the Pratt Bulletins, andthe pamphlet entitled Judicial Procedures at Pratt.CHEATINGIf students use dishonest methods to fulfill course requirements, they are cheating. Examples of thisinclude, but are not limited to: • Obtaining or offering copies of exams or information about the content of exams in advance. • Bringing notes in any form to a closed book exam. • Looking at another student’s paper during an exam. • Receiving or communicating any information from or to another student during an exam.PLAGIARISMPlagiarism is a bit more complicated, but the rules of documentation and citation are very specific andare tailored to different academic disciplines. Types of plagiarism include: • Including any material from any source other than you in a paper or project without proper attribution. This includes material from the Internet, books, papers, or projects by other students, and from any other source. • Using your own work to fulfill requirements for more than one course. • The extensive use of the ideas of others in your work without proper attribution. • Turning in work done by another person or a fellow student as one’s own.Please remember that all work must be the student’s own. If it is not, the source should be citedand documented appropriately. If there are aspects of this statement that are not understood, askfaculty members for help.“COMMUNITY STANDARDS”Students must adhere to all Institute-wide policies listed in the Bulletin under “Community Standards”and which include policies on attendance, academic integrity, plagiarism, computer, and network use.ACCOMMODATION OF DISABILITIESNot a problem, you should talk to me after class. However, I am required to state that students whorequire special accommodations for disabilities must obtain clearance from the Office of DisabilityServices at the beginning of the semester. You should contact Mai McDonald, Disability ServicesCoordinator, in the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, Main Building, Lower Level: 718-636-3711. Cultural Studies (SS 330.01-.02), Pratt Institute, Spring 2010

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