Jtel creativity carl_smith_ltri

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Interdisciplinary techniques and methodologies for employing creativity across research practise.
Keywords: Post Digital Design; Context Engineering; Macroscopic Visualisation; Spacification
Abstract:
In the fourth ICT Work Programme under FP7; Objective 1 of Challenge 8: ICT for Creativity and Learning defines the research priorities and the expected impact as “a better understanding of the potential of technology in human creative processes” and “fostering the synergy between understanding and enhancing human creativity, and new technologies”
This lecture and workshop will focus on how we can bring some powerful creative design processes together with available analogue and digital technologies to explore the 'possibility space’ of our research practises.
One of the fundamental methods of employing creativity across research practice is to find methods and tools that review the construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction of the individual research landscape itself. Some of the other interdisciplinary techniques and methodologies for employing creativity across research practices will include:
1) Performing analogue and digital context engineering.
2) Re-navigating using macroscopic visualisation.
3) Exploring the content-form relationship involved in research writing.

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Jtel creativity carl_smith_ltri

  1. 1. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteInterdisciplinary Techniques andMethodologies for EmployingCreativity Across Research PractisesCarl SmithDirectorLearning Technology Research Institute (LTRI)London Metropolitan UniversityAmbjörn NaeveDirectorKnowledge Management Research GroupRoyal Institute of Technology,Stockholm, Sweden
  2. 2. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteOverviewThis lecture and workshop will focus on how wecan combine creative design processes withavailable analogue and digital technologies toexplore the possibility space‟ of our researchpractises and projects.
  3. 3. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteCreativity Techniques and Methodologies1) Hybrid Reality / Mixed Reality2) Post Digital Design/ New Aesthetic3) Performing Analogue and Digital Context Engineering.4) Macroscopic Visualisation.5) Body hacking / Reality hacking.6) Perceptual Augmentation Devices.
  4. 4. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteObjective 1 of FP7 Challenge 8: ICT forCreativity and Learning + Horizon 2020 -Research priorities: Gaining a better understanding of the potential of technology in humancreative processes and fostering the synergy between them. The development of creative experience tools that make use of all oursenses and allow for richer, more collaborative experiences. Progress towards a formal understanding of creativity with a view toadvancing the measurable capability of computers. Improved efficiency ofcreative processes. Roadmaps for future research and innovation in the creative industries. Improved competitive position of the European cultural and creativeindustries- closer dialogue between research and industry.
  5. 5. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteCRe-AM Creativity Research Adaptive Roadmap. FP7 ICT-2013.8.1 Technologies and scientific foundations inthe field of creativity. This project aims to bridge communitiesof creators with communities of technology providers andinnovators, in a collective, strategic intelligence/road mappingeffort. Ranked #1 in call
  6. 6. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research Institute1) Hybrid Reality / Mixed Reality
  7. 7. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteOur embodied ability to generate meaningThe 1990s were about the virtual. We werefascinated by the new virtual spaces madepossible by computer technologies. Images ofan escape into a virtual space that leavesphysical space useless (Manovich, 2005)In cyberspace, without our embodied ability tograsp meaning, relevance slips through ournon-existent fingers (Dreyfus, 2001).
  8. 8. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteMixed Reality
  9. 9. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteThe world as an interface - Implications forcreativity – Every object becomes a file.
  10. 10. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteComputer Vision : PTAM
  11. 11. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteClay Vision
  12. 12. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteAncient Technology with Modern Pedagogy
  13. 13. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteAncient Technology: Body Mnemonics„the body space is a veryindividual culturally definedconstruct, and thus canprovide a highly personalisedand meaningful interface.”(Ängeslevä, J. 2003)
  14. 14. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteThe power of association – developingtransferable skills using spatial constructionand manipulation
  15. 15. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research Institute
  16. 16. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research Institute360 films Escaping the fixed, fragmented point of view Using technology to capture the context (bi directional) Link up with real time search Giga pixel images – magnification of the context.Zoom down to the atomic level to see what conditionsat that level are doing to form the context. http://edition.cnn.com/interactive/2010/01/world/haiti.360/index.2.html
  17. 17. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteCreativity Technique Explore the design and interaction (between the units ofconstruction) of your research landscapes or projects by re-imagining (or re-imaging) them architecturally. Use a very familiar room to tag or google sketch up to createa basic model. Explore the resulting relationships betweenthe physical, digital and conceptual aspects of the reformedlandscape.
  18. 18. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research Institute2) Post Digital Design / New Aesthetic Hybrid reality tools are shaping our experience of a new blendeddigital subjective/analogue objective space. Well designed MAR should enable the creation of situations andconcepts that could not have been realised before by uniting thestrengths, features and possibilities of both the physical and thevirtual space. With hybrid reality the emphasis is firmly on bi directional spatialconstruction which creates a requirement for an increase inspatial literacy. The New Aesthetic is a term used to refer to the eruption of thedigital within physical space; the increasing appearance of thevisual language of digital technology in the physical world.
  19. 19. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstitutePost digital design - DeformscapeArchitect Thom Faulders:explores interfacesbetween space,perception, and context.He situates the practiceof architecture within abroader context ofperformative researchand materialinvestigations thatnegotiate dynamicrelationships betweenusers and environments.
  20. 20. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research Institute
  21. 21. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstitutePost digital design - mvrdv cloudhttp://www.designboom.com/architecture/mvrdv-the-cloud/
  22. 22. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstitutePost Digital Design Space
  23. 23. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research Institute
  24. 24. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteA revolution in spatial literacy: Access tonew spaces: Implications for what can beknown
  25. 25. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteFractured View = No common ground /(Cultural Heritage) = Reduction in Creativity/ Knowledge Construction.
  26. 26. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteLabelling is not real knowledge? Feynman
  27. 27. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteThe label allowed the object to be seen
  28. 28. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteInstead of having to learn it you can just see it
  29. 29. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteImportance of peripheral vision. Exercise your peripheral vision - eyes can learn.Scientists have found that there is a neurotransmitterin the peripheral nervous system, that is crucial tofocus and memory. Exercise: Stare straight ahead for several secondsand don‟t move your eyes. Mentally note everythingyou can see without moving your eyes. When youbelieve you‟ve taken note of everything, write downeverything you saw. Then, try the exercise again andsee if you can add to your list. This is a problem with augmented reality which tendsto focus on only what is directly in front of you.
  30. 30. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteContext Engine: Inception App
  31. 31. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteDimensions App Dimensions isn‟t played on the touchscreen of yourdevice, it is played in your real life. The app makes use of every possible sensor on theiPhone. In Dimensions, you really are inside the game Most games require your full attention when you playthem this is played in the periphery.
  32. 32. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteGoing beyond the limits of print by usingthe body as the interaction device.
  33. 33. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteLooking at data in ways not previously possible.
  34. 34. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteThe units of construction
  35. 35. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteThe Evolution of form through Networked data„To be able to follow the tradition of eacharchitectural element, be it a portal, a niche or avault; to witness its interplay with correspondingforms as spatial motifs in paintings and treatises;and in some cases see how this interplay leads toan evolution in the complexity of a form. This willlead eventually to an understanding of thehumanities subjects that is profoundly differentfrom that which has traditionally been possible.‟(Veltman,2002)
  36. 36. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteImages and Models as Interfaces
  37. 37. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteMethodology Use MIXED REALITY techniques to give access to the UNITSOF CONSTRUCTION OFKNOWLEDGE Use MULTIPLE POINTS OFVIEW to examine thoseunits of constructionfor EVOLUTIONS OF FORM. Use those evolutions of form to create NETWORKS of theCONSTRUCTION METHODOLOGIES
  38. 38. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteHeruka Mandala – Entering the data To create a live 3D walk-through of a BuddhistMandala. The mainintention is to provide avisualization aid formeditators.
  39. 39. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research Institute3) Performing Analogue and Digital Context Engineering
  40. 40. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteDigital Context Engineering
  41. 41. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteSame Height Parties :artist Hans Hemmertexplores the notion ofhow first impressions aremade, as any heightrelated impressions aresubverted. Usually whentalking to people it‟ssuggested you approachthem at their level. Eyecontact is constantlyrecommended as a wayto bond with people.Context Engineering - Conversation Spacification
  42. 42. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteContext EngineeringInnespaceProductionshave created aseries of uniquedolphin-inspiredsubmersibleboats that canjump, dive androll like realdolphins.
  43. 43. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteContext EngineeringErnesto NetoHis immersive architecturalhabitats, create a zonewhere body and mind,sense and intellect are inconstant flux.The sculpture is the wearerin this relationship.Ernesto Neto Humanoids
  44. 44. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteContext Engineering: Presence and FunctionRyuji Nakamura -Pond: the tensilearrangement of theflexible stringsallows inhabitantsto augment theirpresencerequirements.Augmentingchanges in functionand environment.Creative Learningspaces.
  45. 45. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research Institute4) Macroscopic Visualisation• The macroscope effectivelyprovides the overview and thelocal point of view of theresearch object simultaneously.• Within one field of view, to beboth in the world and to seeyourself in it. The power oflooking through, and occupying,your own field of vision.• We can see through satellitesnow.
  46. 46. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteCreativity technique - MacroscopicVisualisation Well-designed research landscapes and their individualspaces should provide the ability to interactively re-programassociations for alternative juxtapositions and points of view. One method of achieving this in terms of a navigationalmethodology is to develop macroscopic interfaces. This is designed to enable users of those researchlandscapes to look across data sets and turn every object ofstudy into a file in order to discover patterns and rapidlyreframe their understanding.
  47. 47. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research Institute5) Body Hacking - The development of creative experiencetools that make use of all our senses and allow for richer,more collaborative experiences.
  48. 48. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteBody Hacking as Quantified self Body hacking for self transformation: weight,exercise habits, sleep patterns – they can all bequantified and as a result decisions about your daycan be based on your personal -analytics. Just like an engineer will analyse data and tweakspecifications in order to optimise a softwareprogram, people are -collecting and correlating dataon the “inputs and outputs” of their bodies tooptimise physical and mental performance.
  49. 49. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstitutePersuasive MirrorA HCI device that provides enhanced visualfeedback using the appropriate psychologicalstrategies to support lifestyle behaviourchange.
  50. 50. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteNeuroscience: Hacking brain activity
  51. 51. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research Institute6) Perceptual Augmentation DevicesExploring perceptualexpansion throughsensory substitutionand augmentation. Thefunction of thesedevices is to activatenew pathways forsensory perception andto expand the bodyssenses.
  52. 52. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstitutePlug-in architecture - Walter PichlerAbsolute Architecture: For Pichler andHollein, architecture was not what itenables, nor what in encloses, but whatit is.
  53. 53. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteLorenz Potthasts Decelerator helmet"Decelerator," the avantgarde piece of headgeardoes just that: it has acamera that feeds video tothe head-mounted displayinside, with the wearer (orsomeone else) able tocontrol the speed of thevideo playback with aremote.
  54. 54. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteFlyVIZ headset - 360-degree super(vision) Augmenting a sense to give theperson wearing it somethingthat the rest of us dont have;the power to see all aroundthem at once. What does thismean? You can dodge ballsthrown at you from behind. Works by reformatting the 360-degree image to removedistortion and compress it to fitinto a humans field of view. 15 min for brain to adjust. The FlyVIZ can only give you360-degree vision: you mustchoose how to use it.
  55. 55. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteJulius-Von-Bismarck - Topshot-Helmet –Inducing OBE
  56. 56. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research Institute
  57. 57. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteConclusion: Researching the navigational shift that results when the worlditself becomes the interface. Mixing analogue and digitalmaterial in post digital „context engines‟. Fluidity of thinking relates to fluidity of movement (Maher) Design problem: Replacing imagination withgraphics/visualisation? How space for experiential communication has beenconstructed in the past will not necessarily dictate futurepotential. How to build daydreaming back in – no down time. Thesubconcious is ten thousand times stronger than theconscious mind. How to access the hypnagogic state ofconsciousness.
  58. 58. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteBrian eno - Building a trap to catchinspiration and creativity’:Brian Eno sums it up perfectly: “I often think I dont have asingle new idea in my head. But the big mistake is to just waitfor inspiration to happen. You have to build a trap to catch it. Ilike to do that by starting the very mundane task of tidying mystudio. It may seem like it has nothing to do with the creativejob in hand but I think tidying up is a form of daydreaming, andwhat youre really doing is tidying up your mind. Its a kind ofmental preparation. Its a way of getting your mind in place tonotice something."
  59. 59. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteBlogs on creativity http://vimeo.com/channels/designfiction http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/ http://new-aesthetic.tumblr.com/
  60. 60. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteWorkshop tasks Question 1) What is creativity for you? Question 2) Think of a research problem that could beaddressed using any of the creativity techniques, tools andmethodologies outlined here or others you know. Question 3) Can we ever have a formal (measurable)understanding of creativity?
  61. 61. London Metropolitan University Learning Technology Research InstituteQuestionscarl.smith@londonmet.ac.ukhttp://www.makototojiki.com/

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