Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Ubiquitous Media: Designing Future User Experiences with Pervasive Displays and Cameras

278

Published on

All visions of the future contain images of pervasive screens throughout the lives of users: Days Made of Glass, Minority Report, Blade Runner, even Apple’s Knowledge Navigator of 1987. Research …

All visions of the future contain images of pervasive screens throughout the lives of users: Days Made of Glass, Minority Report, Blade Runner, even Apple’s Knowledge Navigator of 1987. Research centers are creating technologies for autoscopic 3D, flexible displays, augmented reality, responsive media, immersive goggles and domes, inexpensive pervasive displays, and all running at 8K resolution or higher.

How do we separate the hype from the reality of these visions? Which of these innovations will users reject, like 3D TV, which will take off, and how can we decide which innovations to design for? Technology advocates often compare media technology innovations to the change from black-and-white to color TV, but when is that characterization fair and when is it overstatement? In this presentation, I’ll present a case study in the field of responsive media, called Responsive Mirror, and apply lessons learned from that to anticipate the fates of today’s hot topics in visions of tomorrow’s ubiquitous media.

Target Audience:
Innovators of new user experiences, particularly visual-based experiences.

Benefit for Participants:
1、A taxonomy of media technology visions: terminology and categories.
2、Lessons learned from deployment of media-based technologies.
3、Aframework for identifying likely adoption of novel media experiences.

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
278
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Page 1 Ubiquitous Media Future User Experiences with Pervasive and Wearable Displays and Cameras Bo Begole, Ph.D., bo@begole.net Head of Media Technologies Laboratory
  • 2. Ubiquitous Computing For Business technologies that bridge physical and digital worlds • Capabilities, Techniques, Limitations • How to exploit the trends • Key value propositions • Case Studies in • Contextual Intelligence • Hyper-Personal information filtering • Predictive personal marketing • Supply chain disruption • Unanticipated device interoperation • Consumer decision support FT Press, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-706443-4
  • 3. Page 3 • Increasing portion of IP: • TV over IP • Video sharing • New forms of video content • Increase of video to mobile devices • … and multiple devices simultaneously • Displays and devices are proliferating • More powerful and pervasive cameras, mics create bandwidth and other scalability issues • What is the future of Ubiquitous Media? • What innovative services can engage next generation customers? Media MegaTrends
  • 4. Page 4 UHD is happening faster than anticipated 4K UHD coming now and 8K UHD soon CAGR of 69% through 2017 >50% of US homes in 10 years New display tech drives higher rez and frame rates: Wall-size displays, retina-display personal devices, wearable immersive goggles Consumers demanding better audio: fidelity, dynamic range, spatiality
  • 5. Page 5 All kinds of surfaces are becoming displays Flexibles Gases Mist Body parts Walls FoldedCurved
  • 6. Page 6 • Smartphone still rules but wearables provide seamless access to instant messages, music, photos, videos and search • Wearable screens (smart watch) require more efficient transfers • Wearables (watches, Google Glass, etc) create new value to screens and data New video-enabled devices are catching on
  • 7. Page 7 • Research cams exceed 100MP at 60 fps • NHK 8K camera will broadcast in 2016 • Forza up to 200 Mpix @ 60 FPS • Hitachi 8K Endoscope Camera • Reveals fine structure of internal organs • Allows making finer sutures (faster healing) • Considered for telemedicine and remote education • 4K Consumer video cameras w/4K @30fps • Several high-end smartphones • Prosumer cameras • Action cameras • Others: multi-cam arrays, light field, … Advanced Hi-Res Cameras Panasonic HX-A500 $400Panasonic Lumix FZ1000 $850 Forza 100+ MP Hitachi 8K endoscope High-end smartphones
  • 8. HUAWEI TECHNOLOGIES CO., LTD. Media that responds to audience Sensors detect predictors of engagement and disengagement. Tailor content to respond dynamically to maximize engagement. [Yu, Aoki, Woodruff, PARC ‘04] vocal tone [Vogel & Balakrishnan ‘04] proximity, orientation of head & body [Daugman ‘94] pupil dilation [Cohen et al. ‘03] emotion skin temperature [Haro, Flickner, Essa 2000] eye gaze Plus: •Age, gender, ethnicity •Clothing style, •Pulse, skin temp, •Laughter, blink rate, •Activity
  • 9. Page 9 What killed 3D TV? Glasses? Eye strain? Little 3D content? When do people and animals use depth perception? Navigation? Yes Predation? Yes Telling stories? Not so much But past predictions of new media experiences did not take off
  • 10. Page 10 Observation find the unobvious User centered design fit people’s behaviors Pre-technology evaluations assess potential value Rapid system prototyping evaluate value How can we determine valuable applications of pervasive displays and cameras? Design Build Observe & Conceive EvaluateEvaluate Evaluate
  • 11. Page 11 Case Study: Responsive Mirror Jewelry is high-value but not customizable. $13 billion industry (projected annual growth of 8.7% through 2025). Purchase of 22 and 24 carat gold and diamonds viewed as long term investments. Jewelry often purchased in India for special occasions. Largely family owned stores (changing) Trust-based: Families tend to buy from same vendor over generations. [Chu, et al., CHI 2010]
  • 12. Page 12 Buyer and Seller Inter-dependence Antagonistic relationship due to conflicting goals? Buyer wants to spend as little as possible Seller wants to acquire as much as possible And also a Shared Objective, Complementary knowledge Satisfy buyer’s criteria with available merchandise Has knowledge of Needs Information Buyer (and companions) Satisfaction criteria Seller’s alternatives Seller Alternatives Buyer’s criteria
  • 13. Page 13 Sales Interaction Model From perspective of sales person Stages and sub-tasks in sales process Generate Trust Maintain Trust Foster long- term relationship [adapted from Making Sales, Robert Prus, 1989] Manage Relationship Promote Interest Obtain Commitment Neutralize Reservations Obtain Commitment Manage Disruptions from Others Offer Services Present ProductsAssess Customer Need Alternative Applications
  • 14. Page 14 Formative Study What are the practices in retail Indian jewelry? Interviewed >12 people with experience of jewelry shopping in India. Visited four stores that specialize in Indian jewelry. Interviewed 3 store owners and 4 salespeople Observed store processes for >20 hrs
  • 15. Page 15 Observed Shopping Process Buyer-seller interaction Enter store, Browse counters Asks to look at items View in mirror, Get feedback from companions/sales- person Put item away or in tray Asks to look at top choices Puts top choices in tray, brings mirror Buyer/Companions Seller Browsing Phase Evaluation Phase Retrieves items, brings closest mirror Give feedback, Make other suggestions Greets shopper, stand across counter
  • 16. Page 16 Key Findings Mirrors – common point of interaction between buyer, seller, and companions for feedback and alternative recommendations. Tray – for detailed comparison, jewelry items placed side-by-side. Shoppers often do not try jewelry on again (due to effort required). Shoppers use multiple criteria when evaluating jewelry, observed to approximate trying on jewelry several times.
  • 17. Page 17 Key Findings Mirrors – common point of interaction between buyer, seller, and companions for feedback and alternative recommendations. Tray – for detailed comparison, jewelry items placed side-by-side. Shoppers often do not try jewelry on again (due to effort required). Shoppers use multiple criteria when evaluating jewelry, observed to approximate trying on jewelry several times. Record users trying on jewelry. Enable side-by-side visual comparisons. Design a system around the functionality of the mirror and tray.
  • 18. Page 18 Countertop Responsive Mirror Capture and “Matched Access” System
  • 19. Page 19 Lisa Katayama, “PARC’s Responsive Mirror = Every girl’s shopping fantasy come true”, http://gadgets.boingboing.net/2009/06/30/how-parcs-responsive.html
  • 20. Page 20 Field Trials Goal - Identify high-order issues affecting usability of system to all users (buyers, sellers, companions) Short installations for qualitative feedback to iterate the design. Learned realistic constraints and opportunities of deploying technology in jewelry stores. Field trials 3 deployments in 2 stores 1 deployment in home
  • 21. Page 21 Conclusions from Trials Matched viewing was exciting to shoppers, delighted salespeople. Device was used by shopper’s companions for conversations. Playback motion conveyed “personality” better than still images or mirror. System provided a convenient inventory of jewelry even after salesperson had put items away. Viewing captured images provided a greater sense of how a third person would perceive their look.
  • 22. Page 22 What happened?
  • 23. Page 23 What happened? Privacy: Because system was deployed in trusted jewelry shop, customers would trust the store owner would properly maintain their privacy. But: Store owner didn’t want the risk. Shoppers, companions and salespeople LOVED it. But: the system didn’t lead to more sales.
  • 24. Page 24 Observation find the unobvious User centered design fit people’s behaviors Pre-technology evaluations assess potential value Rapid system prototyping evaluate value Methods for High-Impact Innovation Design Build Observe & Conceive EvaluateEvaluate Evaluate

×