The geography of community  resilience to hazards &          disastersDr. Iraphne Childs, UQ-GPEM   School of Geography, P...
Resilience through the phases of disasterAEM Handbook #2 Community Recovery. Fig. 4.1: Effect of disaster on ongoing commu...
Resilience in the disaster management cycle               Prepare                                         Respond         ...
Resilience in preparation phase  • Cyclone Zoe: 27-30 Dec, 2002,  Tikopia & Anuta, Solomon Islands
Cyclone Zoe: 27-30 Dec, 2002,Tikopia & Anuta, Solomon IslandsTikopia showing main settlements 30 April 2005Mertz et.al.(20...
Tikopia after the cyclone                            food gardens destroyedHad anyone survived?
Freshwater from lake & springs in hills Local Recovery strategies – temporary sheltersphotos: Anderson-Berry, L., Iroi, c....
Miracle on Tikopia ?                                - or a resilient                                community?Most unlikel...
Resilience during the event SW Qld floods, St.George, Feb.2012
SW Qld floods, St.George, Feb.2012St.George   Dalby
St George• RS info. captured and validated in December  2011 provided contours to 0.25m, previously  10m• 2011 Floodlines ...
High & Low Flood Hazard MapLocal verification gives additional information on key localcharacteristics e.g. irrigation cha...
Day 2: Monday Feb.6, 2012key agencies meetings….daily, 8.00am& 4.00pm • Police (chair) • Red Cross (centre management) • D...
The Courier Mail Sat. 11 Feb, 2012
Resilience during recovery &           beyond    SEQ floods & Cyclone Yasi          Jan-Feb, 2011.
Building resilience into recovery
Building Resilience• Provides better long term outcomes - personal, financial and physical• Enhances ability to minimise t...
QRA’s Land Use Planning TeamProjects:• Grantham and Tully Heads/ Hull  Heads – priority areas for rebuild• Floodplain Mana...
Increasing resilience – a geographers’contribution• Focus on hazard areas – which areas of town ?• Analyse results in leve...
http://www.gpem.uq.edu.au/geogday-resources
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Geographies of Community Resilience, Response and Recovery to Natural Hazards, Dr. Iraphne Childs and Dr. Peter Hastings, University of Queensland

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The contemporary management of natural hazards promotes building community resilience through risk management and comprehensive attention to
prevention, preparedness, response and recovery. Achieving adequate planning for possible disasters requires identifying and understanding the
geographical attributes, both physical and social, that may contribute to the resilience and/or vulnerability of places to such events. Subsequent disaster and
community planning can then be strategically applied to enhance resilience. Referring to recent events, this session will workshop the geography of
community vulnerability and resilience to disasters, identify the links to strategic response and recovery, and discuss how resilience can be built during these
operational phases.

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Geographies of Community Resilience, Response and Recovery to Natural Hazards, Dr. Iraphne Childs and Dr. Peter Hastings, University of Queensland

  1. 1. The geography of community resilience to hazards & disastersDr. Iraphne Childs, UQ-GPEM School of Geography, Planning & Environmental Management
  2. 2. Resilience through the phases of disasterAEM Handbook #2 Community Recovery. Fig. 4.1: Effect of disaster on ongoing community development andinterface with relief and recovery
  3. 3. Resilience in the disaster management cycle Prepare Respond RESILIENCE ‘the capacity to prevent, mitigate, prep are for, respond to and recover from the Prevent impacts of disasters’. Recover
  4. 4. Resilience in preparation phase • Cyclone Zoe: 27-30 Dec, 2002, Tikopia & Anuta, Solomon Islands
  5. 5. Cyclone Zoe: 27-30 Dec, 2002,Tikopia & Anuta, Solomon IslandsTikopia showing main settlements 30 April 2005Mertz et.al.(2010). School of Geography, Planning & Environmental Management
  6. 6. Tikopia after the cyclone food gardens destroyedHad anyone survived?
  7. 7. Freshwater from lake & springs in hills Local Recovery strategies – temporary sheltersphotos: Anderson-Berry, L., Iroi, c. And Rangi, A (2003) Survival foods
  8. 8. Miracle on Tikopia ? - or a resilient community?Most unlikely outcome of thisdisaster event-100% survival rate- no deaths & few injuries........... Why? How?
  9. 9. Resilience during the event SW Qld floods, St.George, Feb.2012
  10. 10. SW Qld floods, St.George, Feb.2012St.George Dalby
  11. 11. St George• RS info. captured and validated in December 2011 provided contours to 0.25m, previously 10m• 2011 Floodlines captured including aerial imagery• Flood gauges in town with records back to 1916• Flooding benchmarks for St George: – Minor 4.0m – Moderate 5.0m – Major 6.0m – Town affected at 12.1m – Bridge affected at 10.6m• Previous highest recorded flood March 2010 13.39m• 5 February 2012 new highest recorded at 13.95m
  12. 12. High & Low Flood Hazard MapLocal verification gives additional information on key localcharacteristics e.g. irrigation channel acts as levee forsouthern part of town
  13. 13. Day 2: Monday Feb.6, 2012key agencies meetings….daily, 8.00am& 4.00pm • Police (chair) • Red Cross (centre management) • Dalby Mayor or Council rep. LGDMC • Daly showgrounds facilities manager • Dept. of Community Services (DOCs) • Centrelink • Lions Club/Zonta/Rotary/Salvo’s – catering • St.John’s ambulance • Lifeline • Chaplains
  14. 14. The Courier Mail Sat. 11 Feb, 2012
  15. 15. Resilience during recovery & beyond SEQ floods & Cyclone Yasi Jan-Feb, 2011.
  16. 16. Building resilience into recovery
  17. 17. Building Resilience• Provides better long term outcomes - personal, financial and physical• Enhances ability to minimise the effects of disaster events on the community, economy and environment• Builds upon, rather than replaces, existing strengths and arrangements DARMSyS: DAMAGE ASSESSMENT & RECONSTRUCTIONMONITORING SYSTEM
  18. 18. QRA’s Land Use Planning TeamProjects:• Grantham and Tully Heads/ Hull Heads – priority areas for rebuild• Floodplain Management – strategic project• Critical Infrastructure – specifically focussed on electrical infrastructure• Strategic Land Use Assessments to inform new planning schemes and ensure recent events are taken into account
  19. 19. Increasing resilience – a geographers’contribution• Focus on hazard areas – which areas of town ?• Analyse results in levels of risk for land use purposes – low, medium and high• Which parts of town are at ‘high’ risk ? – retreat from these areas• Other properties closer to centre of town ‘low’ or ‘medium’ risk – adapt these areas to the risk
  20. 20. http://www.gpem.uq.edu.au/geogday-resources

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