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COLAL 2011 Top Ten Reasons Information Professionals Succeed

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Presentation to COLAL 2011 (Conference for Ontario Law Associations' Libraries) …

Presentation to COLAL 2011 (Conference for Ontario Law Associations' Libraries)
The conference for Ontario Law Associations' Libraries is the primary vehicle for continuing education for the library staff in the 48 County and District Law Libraries in Ontario.

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  • Life long learning with a twist of limeThe world is their classroomProbers, thinkers, scanners of other industries and professionsHarvard Certified Market Research FirmHead of Innovation for Electronic ContentSearch Engine Marketing for Fortune 500 FirmsIf their work is stifling them and closing doors, they look out the window and are gone out and “up” pretty quickly
  • Henry Mintzberg (1994), one of the leading authorities in the area of strategicmanagement, by contrast, clearly emphasizes that strategic thinking is not merely “alternative nomenclature for everything falling under the umbrella of strategicmanagement”. It is a particular way of thinking with specific and clearly discerniblecharacteristics. In explaining the difference between strategic planning and strategicthinking, Mintzberg argues that strategic planning is the systematic programming ofpre-identified strategies from which an action plan is developed. Strategic thinking,on the other hand, is a synthesizing process utilizing intuition and creativity whoseoutcome is “an integrated perspective of the enterprise.” The problem, as he sees it,is that traditional planning approaches tend to undermine, rather than appropriately4SystemsPerspectiveIntelligentOpportunismIntent FocusThinking in TimeHypothesis DrivenStrategicThinkingFigure 1: The Elements of Strategic ThinkingFrom Jeanne M. Liedtka: Strategic Thinking: Can it be Taught?integrate, strategic thinking and this tends to impair successful organizationaladaptation. These sentiments are echoed by two other leading theorists in the field, Prahalad andHamel (1989), who describe traditional approaches to planning as “form filling.” They refer to strategic thinking as “crafting strategic architecture” but emphasizeMintzberg’s general themes of creativity, exploration, and understandingdiscontinuities.For Ralph Stacey (1992), strategic thinking is “. .
  • Henry Mintzberg (1994), one of the leading authorities in the area of strategicmanagement, by contrast, clearly emphasizes that strategic thinking is not merely “alternative nomenclature for everything falling under the umbrella of strategicmanagement”. It is a particular way of thinking with specific and clearly discerniblecharacteristics. In explaining the difference between strategic planning and strategicthinking, Mintzberg argues that strategic planning is the systematic programming ofpre-identified strategies from which an action plan is developed. Strategic thinking,on the other hand, is a synthesizing process utilizing intuition and creativity whoseoutcome is “an integrated perspective of the enterprise.” The problem, as he sees it,is that traditional planning approaches tend to undermine, rather than appropriately4SystemsPerspectiveIntelligentOpportunismIntent FocusThinking in TimeHypothesis DrivenStrategicThinkingFigure 1: The Elements of Strategic ThinkingFrom Jeanne M. Liedtka: Strategic Thinking: Can it be Taught?integrate, strategic thinking and this tends to impair successful organizationaladaptation. These sentiments are echoed by two other leading theorists in the field, Prahalad andHamel (1989), who describe traditional approaches to planning as “form filling.” They refer to strategic thinking as “crafting strategic architecture” but emphasizeMintzberg’s general themes of creativity, exploration, and understandingdiscontinuities.For Ralph Stacey (1992), strategic thinking is “. .
  • Let’s try it
  • Virtual service delivery is preferred by allMost are providing services through their organization’s intranetLess emphasis on transactional library services & more emphasis on people-intensive services & integrating services into workflows:Staff deliver research as opposed to reference services, working closely with, aligned or embedded as part of project or functional teams; in National Institutes of Health this role is for “informationists”“Services are highly integrated with the organization’s workflow & there is constant partnering with other people/areas of the firm in providing services.”One organization experimenting with doing this electronically rather than having the librarian physically with the work team other corporations use technology to have all research requests centrally pooled & assigned according to the librarians specialty &/or availability
  • Step into that future – design it by being there -
  • As information becomes increasingly regarded as a commodity, high value roles will be applied at the ends of the process and rarely in the middle
  • Dad – curious about his profession – looked to artificial insemination – contributed – on boards --
  • Transcript

    • 1. Top 10 Reasons Why Information Professionals Succeed Fueling the Fire Rebecca Jones, MLS rebecca@dysartjones.com www.dysartjones.comPLC, Faculty of Information Studies, University of Toronto Dysart & Jones Associates
    • 2. My Lens Government & Non-Profit Information Industry Public Academic Corporate Personal
    • 3. Curiosity
    • 4. Persistent Learning
    • 5. John Seely Brown, Internet Librarian 2011
    • 6. Risk Chancing
    • 7. Contributing
    • 8. Critical Thinking
    • 9. Strengthening Strengths
    • 10. Conversing & Dialoguing
    • 11. Interest in the Context
    • 12. Focus on Impact
    • 13. Professional Competence Information Organizations Information Tools &Information Resources Technologies Information Services
    • 14. “Services are highlyAlign, Embed & Integrate integrated with the organization’s workflow and there is constant partnering with other people/areas of the firm in providing services.”
    • 15. Focusing on the future Stand in the future
    • 16. Evolving doesn’t mean erasing Systems librarians Taxonomy, cataloguing & indexing consultants Oh yeah….let’s not forget… Reference, research & advisory
    • 17. Scan, dig, adapt, adopt"It taught me how to be organized and to do research. It also taught me the value of information and the role of service in an organization. Phyllis Yaffe, COO Alliance Atlantis
    • 18. Our potential is now Our potential is now
    • 19. Our Personal Competencies Seek challenges & new opportunities See the big picture Communicate effectively Present ideas clearly, confidently Create partnerships & alliances Plan, prioritize & focus on critical Take calculated risks Team approach Plan career
    • 20. Who Succeeds Musing from My Lens
    • 21. We are in a service revolution Farmers add value by enhancing seed or breed development or by creating specialty foods We must research our markets and processes  Where can we expand, what market gap can we fill? We must analyze our portfolios of skills  What must we start, stop, continue?  What can we outsource in terms of our roles that enable us to concentrate on what we truly want to do?
    • 22. In which we must be politically adept  Connect people “The art of bringing people together to get the right things done." Donna Scheeder Deputy CIO Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress former Director of Congressional Law Library, former Director of Congressional Research and Past-President of SLA
    • 23. Our individual & collective success depends on our:  Readiness:  Continuous competency & professional development & demonstration  Relationships:  Networking in your organization & your profession  Realism:  Understanding what’s required in the role you want, & what the organization requires
    • 24. To thine own self be true Be curious Persist to learn Chance risks Contribute Think critically Strengthen your strengths Converse & dialogue Take an interest in the context Demonstrate professional competence Focus on the impact of what you do
    • 25. Thank you Slides at www.dysartjones.com

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