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Informing pedagogy through collaborative inquiry
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Informing pedagogy through collaborative inquiry

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SoTL research is often instigated and directed by the instructors or facilitators who are responsible for a given course, program, seminar, or workshop. The facilitators, or sometimes an outside …

SoTL research is often instigated and directed by the instructors or facilitators who are responsible for a given course, program, seminar, or workshop. The facilitators, or sometimes an outside person is the researcher, while the students are the subjects. Even in participatory action research, the learners are still primarily treated as subjects. Recently, the author designed and delivered a graduate level course where the entire course design became the subject of a co-operative inquiry. In co-operative inquiry, “members of the group contribute both to the ideas that go into their work together, and also are part of the activity that is being researched. Everyone has a say in deciding what questions are to be addressed and what ideas may be of help; everyone contributes to thinking about how to explore the questions; everyone gets involved in the activity that is being researched; and finally everybody has a say in whatever conclusions the co-operative inquiry group may reach. So in co-operative inquiry the split between 'researcher' and 'subjects' is done away with, and all those involved act together as 'co-researchers' and as 'co-subjects'. “(Heron, 1992).In other words the learners are also the researchers alongside the instructor. This presentation is intended to outline the methodology known as co-operative inquiry, to briefly report on the author’s experiences with this approach in a graduate level Education class, and to solicit collaborators in pursuing possible opportunities to explore this approach further in undergraduate courses.

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  • 1. Informing Pedagogy Through Co-operative Inquiry Calls for Collaboration, Triangulation, and Development Katrin Becker Sat. 8:30-9:30 Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 1
  • 2. Overview • • • • • • • • Katrin Becker Who AM I? The Usual Scenario What is Co-operative Inquiry? How Might We Proceed? One Case Lessons Learned Call to Action Resources SoTL- 2013 2
  • 3. Who Am I? Katrin Becker, PhD Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 3
  • 4. Group 1: Group 2: Group 3: Group 4: Group 5: Reports On Particular Classes Reflections On Years Of Teaching Experience, Implicitly Or Explicitly Informed By Other Scholarship On Teaching Larger Contexts: Comparisons Of Courses & Comparisons Of Student Change Across Time Formal Research Summaries And Analyses Of Sets Of Prior Studies A. It worked! D. Essays Developing Good Ideas G. Qualitative Studies Designed To Explore A Key Issue. J. Experimental Analyses K. Annotated Bibliographies. B. Before & After: Qualitative Assessments Of Changes In Practice. C. Before & After: Quantitative Assessments Of Changes In Practice. Katrin Becker E. Summaries Of Expert Knowledge Gained By SelfReflection And Experimentation In Ones Own Teaching. F. Integration Of Larger Frameworks With Classroom & Curriculum Practice H. Quantitative Comparisons Of Different Courses Or Sections I. Comparisons Of A Wide Array Of Different Courses Using A Common Assessment Instrument. L. Brief, Annotated Summaries Of Key Findings In The Research Literature. M. Formal (Quantitative) Meta-Analyses Genres of SoTL Credit: Craig E. Nelson, Professor Emeritus of Biology, Indiana University SoTL- 2013 4
  • 5. Where I do Most of My Work Group 1: Group 2: Group 3: Group 4: Group 5: Reports On Particular Classes Reflections On Years Of Teaching Experience, Implicitly Or Explicitly Informed By Other Scholarship On Teaching Larger Contexts: Comparisons Of Courses & Comparisons Of Student Change Across Time Formal Research Summaries And Analyses Of Sets Of Prior Studies A. It worked! D. Essays Developing Good Ideas G. Qualitative Studies Designed To Explore A Key Issue. J. Experimental Analyses K. Annotated Bibliographies. B. Before & After: Qualitative Assessments Of Changes In Practice. C. Before & After: Quantitative Assessments Of Changes In Practice. Katrin Becker E. Summaries Of Expert Knowledge Gained By SelfReflection And Experimentation In Ones Own Teaching. F. Integration Of Larger Frameworks With Classroom & Curriculum Practice H. Quantitative Comparisons Of Different Courses Or Sections I. Comparisons Of A Wide Array Of Different Courses Using A Common Assessment Instrument. L. Brief, Annotated Summaries Of Key Findings In The Research Literature. M. Formal (Quantitative) Meta-Analyses Genres of SoTL Credit: Craig E. Nelson, Professor Emeritus of Biology, Indiana University SoTL- 2013 5
  • 6. Situating Co-operative Inquiry in SoTL Group 1: Group 2: Group 3: Group 4: Group 5: Reports On Particular Classes Reflections On Years Of Teaching Experience, Implicitly Or Explicitly Informed By Other Scholarship On Teaching Larger Contexts: Comparisons Of Courses & Comparisons Of Student Change Across Time Formal Research Summaries And Analyses Of Sets Of Prior Studies A. It worked! D. Essays Developing Good Ideas G. Qualitative Studies Designed To Explore A Key Issue. J. Experimental Analyses K. Annotated Bibliographies. B. Before & After: Qualitative Assessments Of Changes In Practice. C. Before & After: Quantitative Assessments Of Changes In Practice. Katrin Becker E. Summaries Of Expert Knowledge Gained By SelfReflection And Experimentation In Ones Own Teaching. F. Integration Of Larger Frameworks With Classroom & Curriculum Practice H. Quantitative Comparisons Of Different Courses Or Sections I. Comparisons Of A Wide Array Of Different Courses Using A Common Assessment Instrument. L. Brief, Annotated Summaries Of Key Findings In The Research Literature. M. Formal (Quantitative) Meta-Analyses Genres of SoTL Credit: Craig E. Nelson, Professor Emeritus of Biology, Indiana University SoTL- 2013 6
  • 7. The Usual Scenario image: mediwiki: Evelyn Simak image source: http://www.trialanderroracres.com/ Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 7
  • 8. The Usual Scenario image: mediwiki: Evelyn Simak image source: http://www.trialanderroracres.com/ • Instigated and directed by the instructors or facilitators responsible for course. Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 8
  • 9. The Usual Scenario image: mediwiki: Evelyn Simak image source: http://www.trialanderroracres.com/ • Instigated and directed by the instructors or facilitators responsible for course. • Outside researcher. Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 9
  • 10. The Usual Scenario image: mediwiki: Evelyn Simak image source: http://www.trialanderroracres.com/ • Instigated and directed by the instructors or facilitators responsible for course. • Outside researcher. • The students are the subjects. Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 10
  • 11. What is Co-Operative Inquiry? All Members • Contribute to work • Are participants in the activity Heron, 1992 Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 11
  • 12. What is Co-Operative Inquiry? Everyone: • • • • Has a say in • Deciding what questions are to be addressed. • What ideas may be of help. Contributes to thinking about how to explore the questions. Gets involved in the activity that is being researched. Has a say in whatever conclusions the co-operative inquiry group may reach. Heron, 1992 Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 12
  • 13. What is Co-Operative Inquiry? So in co-operative inquiry the split between 'researcher' and 'subjects' is done away with, and all those involved act together as 'co-researchers' and as 'co-subjects'. Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 Heron, 1992 13
  • 14. Participatory Action Research Co-Operative Inquiry is a form of PAR. Chevalier, J. M. and Buckles, D. J. (2013) Participatory Action Research: Theory and Methods for Engaged Inquiry, Routledge UK Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 14
  • 15. Participatory Action Research Co-Operative Inquiry is a form of PAR. The learners are still primarily treated as subjects. Chevalier, J. M. and Buckles, D. J. (2013) Participatory Action Research: Theory and Methods for Engaged Inquiry, Routledge UK Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 15
  • 16. What roles do the students play? All Members • Contribute to work • Are participants in the activity Heron, 1992 Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 16
  • 17. What roles do the students play? All Members • Contribute to work maybe • Are participants in the activity Heron, 1992 Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 17
  • 18. What roles do the students play? All Members • Contribute to work maybe • Are participants in the activity Heron, 1992 Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 18
  • 19. What roles do the students play? Learner: • • • • Has a say in • Deciding what questions are to be addressed. • What ideas may be of help. Contributes to thinking about how to explore the questions. Gets involved in the activity that is being researched. Has a say in whatever conclusions the co-operative inquiry group may reach. Heron, 1992 Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 19
  • 20. What roles do the students play? Learner: • • • • Has a say in • Deciding what questions are to be addressed. • What ideas may be of help. Contributes to thinking about how to explore the questions. Gets involved in the activity that is being researched. Has a say in whatever conclusions the co-operative inquiry group may reach. Heron, 1992 Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 20
  • 21. What roles do the students play? Learner: • • • • Katrin Becker Has a say in • Deciding what questions are to be addressed. • What ideas may be of help. (maybe) Contributes to thinking about how to explore the questions. Gets involved in the activity that is being researched. Has a say in whatever conclusions the co-operative inquiry group may reach. SoTL- 2013 Heron, 1992 21
  • 22. What roles do the students play? Learner: • • • • Katrin Becker Has a say in • Deciding what questions are to be addressed. • What ideas may be of help. (maybe) Contributes to thinking about how to explore the questions. (maybe) Gets involved in the activity that is being researched. Has a say in whatever conclusions the co-operative inquiry group may reach. SoTL- 2013 Heron, 1992 22
  • 23. What roles do the students play? Learner: • • • • Katrin Becker Has a say in • Deciding what questions are to be addressed. • What ideas may be of help. (maybe) Contributes to thinking about how to explore the questions. (maybe) Gets involved in the activity that is being researched. Has a say in whatever conclusions the co-operative inquiry group may reach. SoTL- 2013 Heron, 1992 23
  • 24. What roles do the students play? Learner: • • • • Katrin Becker Has a say in • Deciding what questions are to be addressed. • What ideas may be of help. (maybe) Contributes to thinking about how to explore the questions. (maybe) Gets involved in the activity that is being researched. Has a say in whatever conclusions the co-operative inquiry group may reach. SoTL- 2013 Heron, 1992 24
  • 25. My Proposal Include the Students as Equal Partners in Inquiry Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 25
  • 26. How Might We Proceed? Need to address: • Ethics issues. • What kinds of questions can we explore this way? Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 26
  • 27. One Case • Master's Level Education Course • Course Topic: Digital Game-Based Learning (DGBL) • Taught summer 2012 & winter 2013 • ~ 35 participants • Reason for Inquiry: • Experimental Gamified Design Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 27
  • 28. One Case • Students were teachers. • Proposed Co-operative Inquiry 1/2-way through course. Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 28
  • 29. Lessons Learned • • • Katrin Becker More Support / Direction Advance Preparation • decide on research questions / direction • prepare means of data collection • provide multiple ways to participate • template for publications Not Suitable for Novice Learners SoTL- 2013 29
  • 30. What does it look like? • • • • • Katrin Becker Still one P.I. (lead) Onboarding Ethics Data Gathering Dissemination SoTL- 2013 30
  • 31. Call to Action Who's Interested? Katrin Becker Adjunct, Computer Science & Information Systems Mount Royal University kbecker@mtroyal.ca Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 31
  • 32. Resources • Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2000). Handbook of qualitative research (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications. • Heron, J. (1992). Feeling and Personhood: psychology in another key. London: Sage. • Jan, P. (2013). A New Scholarship of Classroom-based, Open, Communal Inquiry. Teaching and Learning Inquiry: The ISSOTL Journal, 1(1), 23-33. • MacDonald, C. (2012). Understanding Participatory Action Research: A Qualitative Research Methodology Option. [Article]. Canadian Journal of Action Research, 13(2), 34-50. • Peer, K., & Martin, M. (2005). The leaner-centered syllabus: From theory to practice in allied health education. The Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice, 3(2). • Richlin, L. (2006). Blueprint for learning : constructing college courses to facilitate, assess, and document learning (1st ed.). Sterling, Va.: Stylus Pub. Katrin Becker SoTL- 2013 32