Gamification how to gamify learning and instruction, part 2 (of 3)
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Gamification how to gamify learning and instruction, part 2 (of 3)

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‘Gamification’ - the use of game elements in non-game contexts - has rapidly become one of the current hottest trends. This presentation presents an overview of what gamification is and isn’t, ...

‘Gamification’ - the use of game elements in non-game contexts - has rapidly become one of the current hottest trends. This presentation presents an overview of what gamification is and isn’t, and reports on the author’s experiences using this approach in a graduate level education class as well as the early results of a comparison between gamified and non-gamified sections of a freshman introduction to computers course. In the current course, the non-gamified sections employ a fairly standard structure that includes various assignments spread out throughout the term, various in-class activities, and both a midterm and final exam. The gamified section organizes all student work into various quests worth from 10 to 200 ‘experience points’ (XP), most of which have no set deadlines. While the quests are effectively equivalent in grade weight to the assignments of the more traditional sections, students in the gamified section start off with a score of zero (0) and every quest they submit contributes to their final grade cumulatively. A final score of 1000 is equivalent to 100%, but the total number of possible XP is 1435. All quests were made available to students at the beginning of term; some could be repeated for XP and included a variety of ‘guild’ (group) quests and ‘solo’ quests; and many quests could be repeated to earn additional XP. The presentation will provide some background on gamification, detail the course structure, highlight early successes and failures, and conclude with strategies for incorporating meaningful gamification in other courses.

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Gamification how to gamify learning and instruction, part 2 (of 3) Gamification how to gamify learning and instruction, part 2 (of 3) Presentation Transcript

  • Gamification: How to Gamify Learning and Instruction PART 2 Katrin Becker
  • Introductions 1. Who Am I 2. What AM I Playing Now? Part 1: What's All the Buzz? 1. What is Gamification? 2. An Inadvertent Con? 3. Gamification is NOT New 4. What IS New? 5. Designing Instruction to be Playful 6. Do's & Don'ts Part 2: Case Study 1. Baby Steps: Gamification on a Small Scale 2. Increasing the Stakes 3. Going All the Way: The Current Experiment 4. Jumping the Gun - Early Conclusions Part 3: De-Briefing Further Resources Overview 21/01/2014 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 2 © 2013 K.Becker
  • Part 2: Case Study Gamification of Typical Courses 21/01/2014 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 3 © 2013 K.Becker View slide
  • Background: • Master's level education course (U of C) • Proposed, designed, implemented 2005 • Also taught 2006, 2007 • All F2F • Previous report on original course (BJET) • Traditional design ◦ ◦ ◦ Readings, discussion Project (design a game or lesson that uses a game) Research paper Inception Part 2: Case Study 21/01/2014 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 4 © 2013 K.Becker View slide
  • 20% Gamified: • 25% Lesson Design • 15% Peer Review of Lesson Design • 25% High Concept Game Design • 15% Peer Review of High Concept Game Design • 20% The DGBL Game Total possible XP: • 470 Class Ave XP: • 231 Range: • 134 – 333 % over 100% • 32% (7/22, + 3 near 100%) Baby Steps: Gamification on a Small Scale Part 2: Case Study 21/01/2014 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 5 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 50% Gamified: • 25% Lesson Design • 25% High Concept Game Design • 50% The DGBL Game Total XP possible: • 1000 Increasing the Stakes Part 2: Case Study 21/01/2014 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 6 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 50% Gamified: • 25% Lesson Design • 25% High Concept Game Design  Class Ave:   • 50% The DGBL Game Range:  Total XP possible:  • 1000 537 380 - 650 % over 100%:  70% (9/13) XP Req'd for Perfect Score: 500 Progression of Earned XP on Gamified Portion ONLY Playing Along Part 2: Case Study 21/01/2014 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 7 © 2013 K.Becker
  • COMP 1103: Introduction to Computers non-majors; 1st year course required for some programs science option broad range of backgrounds "Traditional" student experience: ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ 55% first year 25% second year 13% third year 7% fourth ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ "Gamified"  student experience:         55% open studies 15% business 10% science rest is various arts programs or diplomas student interest:  55% first year 25% second year 15% third year 5% fourth 30% open studies 30% business 20% science rest is various arts programs or diplomas student interest: Going All the Way: The Current Experiment Part 2: Case Study 21/01/2014 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 8 © 2013 K.Becker
  • Support • Requires considerable "on-boarding". Structure • Too little structure for some. • Learners have greater control over their own learning. • Learners felt ownership of their own learning. Competition • Motivating for some. • Discouraging for others. Assessment • Fast grading turn-around essential. • Tendency to grade quantitatively. ◦ Simple grading schemes. ◦ Practical mechanisms for meaningful feedback. Jumping the Gun - Early Conclusions Part 2: Case Study 21/01/2014 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 9 © 2013 K.Becker