Gamification how to gamify learning and instruction, Part 3 (of 3)

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‘Gamification’ - the use of game elements in non-game contexts - has rapidly become one of the current hottest trends. This presentation presents an overview of what gamification is and isn’t, and …

‘Gamification’ - the use of game elements in non-game contexts - has rapidly become one of the current hottest trends. This presentation presents an overview of what gamification is and isn’t, and reports on the author’s experiences using this approach in a graduate level education class as well as the early results of a comparison between gamified and non-gamified sections of a freshman introduction to computers course. In the current course, the non-gamified sections employ a fairly standard structure that includes various assignments spread out throughout the term, various in-class activities, and both a midterm and final exam. The gamified section organizes all student work into various quests worth from 10 to 200 ‘experience points’ (XP), most of which have no set deadlines. While the quests are effectively equivalent in grade weight to the assignments of the more traditional sections, students in the gamified section start off with a score of zero (0) and every quest they submit contributes to their final grade cumulatively. A final score of 1000 is equivalent to 100%, but the total number of possible XP is 1435. All quests were made available to students at the beginning of term; some could be repeated for XP and included a variety of ‘guild’ (group) quests and ‘solo’ quests; and many quests could be repeated to earn additional XP. The presentation will provide some background on gamification, detail the course structure, highlight early successes and failures, and conclude with strategies for incorporating meaningful gamification in other courses.

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  • I like how you presented this, including the slides on Part 1 where you show that learning is already a game. I've also thought that. Great work here. I'm interested in putting it into my own course which is traditionally 'boring' and considered a bird course by many... until they actually take it.
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  • 1. Gamification: How to Gamify Learning and Instruction PART 3 Katrin Becker
  • 2. Introductions 1. Who Am I 2. What AM I Playing Now? Part 1: What's All the Buzz? 1. What is Gamification? 2. An Inadvertent Con? 3. Gamification is NOT New 4. What IS New? 5. Designing Instruction to be Playful 6. Do's & Don'ts Part 2: Case Study 1. Baby Steps: Gamification on a Small Scale 2. Increasing the Stakes 3. Going All the Way: The Current Experiment 4. Jumping the Gun - Early Conclusions Part 3: De-Briefing Further Resources Overview 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 2 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 3. Part 3: De-Briefing Lessons Learned Part 3: De-Briefing 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 3 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 4. Do   Objectives first Offer a variety of quests ◦ Large & small     Fast turn-around of assessments Meaningful rewards Appropriate rewards Fit the "game" to the subject Don't Design the 'game' first  Simply change the names of things  Badges for nothing  Points for nothing  Gamify everything  Use your favorite game as the template  Do's & Don'ts Part 3: De-Briefing 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 4
  • 5. Can’t go completely flexible: • Courses still progress linearly, more-or-less. • There are practical reasons to try and have all students in more or less the same place at the same time W.R.T. some topics. Think of the topic outline as the narrative: • If it were a story; how would it best be told? Course schedule vs game-based: • Variety of topics & quests. • Some quests are tied to specific topics and others are not. Just like in a game: • P learn new things and skills as time progresses. • Some things have pre-reqs. • Others can be attempted at any time. Game-based course is mapped out like a storyboard or concept map rather than linearly as most typical courses are. Learning Lessons Part 3: De-Briefing 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 5 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 6. Designing a Game Part 3: De-Briefing 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 6 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 7. Gamified Course Concept Map Part 3: De-Briefing 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 7 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 8. Gives up on the lock-step lessons notion. • Was never a reality anyways ◦ People are at different stages. • PROBLEM: ◦ Cannot go completely over to individualized learning. ◦ Simply impractical in many situations. Each node is like a gamescreen or location. • Relationships (paths) between nodes are determined by content rather than time. There are quests, items, associated with each node. Game-Based Course Design Part 3: De-Briefing 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 8 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 9. Instructor:       Learner: Up-Front Design Ensuring objectives are addressed. Competency-Based Assessment* Scoring Records keeping Marking Load Taking Ownership of Learning  Motivation  Time Management  Strategizing   Taking Ownership of Learning The Big Challenges Part 3: De-Briefing 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 9
  • 10. Your Turn Gamifying the Syllabus (rules); Tasks (Quests); Grading (& Assessment) Assuming we already have objectives and a syllabus. 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 10 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 11. Create Quests Step 1: Design Meaningful Evidence of Competence Part 4: Your Turn 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 11 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 12. GRADE & GPA Table (Used to calculate student grades on the Gradebook sheet) Score Letter Grade GPA XP Level 0 - 19 F 0.00 0 - 199 0 20 - 39 F 0.00 200 - 399 1 40 - 49 F 0.00 400 - 499 2 50 - 54 D 1.00 500 - 549 3 55 - 59 D+ 1.70 550 - 599 4 60 - 62 C- 1.70 600 - 629 5 63 - 66 C 2.00 630 - 669 6 67 - 69 C+ 2.30 670 - 699 7 70 - 72 B- 2.70 700 - 729 8 73 - 76 B 3.00 730 - 769 9 77 - 79 B+ 3.30 770 - 799 10 80 - 84 A- 3.70 800 - 849 11 85 - 94 A 4.00 850 - 949 12 95 - 100 A+ 4.00 950 - 1000 13 101+ A+ 4.00 1001+ 14 Step 2: Map Scores  XP & Grades  Levels Part 4: Your Turn 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 12 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 13. Step 3: Assign XP values to Quests Part 4: Your Turn 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 13 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 14. Step 4: Decide on: Options; Flexibility; Achievement Path Part 4: Your Turn 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 14 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 15. Step 5: Set Up Scoring Mechanism Part 4: Your Turn 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 15 © 2013 K.Becker
  • 16. • Brands that failed with gamification http://www.imediaconnection.com/content/32280.asp#singleview • Becker, K. (2004). Reconciling a Traditional Syllabus with an Inquiry-Based Introductory Course. The Journal of Computing Science in Colleges, 20(2), 28-37. Becker, K. (2006). How much choice is too much? SIGCSE Bull., 38(4), 78-82. doi: 10.1145/1189136.1189176. Becker, K. (2007). Digital Game Based Learning, Once Removed: Teaching Teachers BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, SIG-GLUE Special Issue on Game-Based Learning 2007, 38(3), 478-488. Bogost, I. (2012). Persuasive Games: Exploitationware. Gamasutra. Retrieved from http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/6366/persuasive_games_exploitationware.php Charles, D., Charles, T., McNeill, M., Bustard, D., & Black, M. (2011). Game-based feedback for educational multi-user virtual environments. British Journal of Educational Technology, 42(4), 638654. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8535.2010.01068.x. Deci, E. and Ryan, R. (2004). Handbook of Self-Determination Research. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press. Deterding, S. (2012). 9.5 Theses on the Power and Efficacy of Gamification. Microsoft Research. [Microsoft Research Video] Retrieved from http://research.microsoft.com/apps/video/dl.aspx?id=174677&l=i on 12 October 2012. Deterding, S., Dixon, D., Khaled, R., & Nacke, L. (2011). From game design elements to gamefulness: defining "gamification". Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 15th International Academic MindTrek Conference: Envisioning Future Media Environments, Tampere, Finland Kapp, K. M. (2012). The gamification of learning and instruction : game-based methods and strategies for training and education. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer. Nicholson, S. (2012). A User-Centered Theoretical Framework for Meaningful Gamification. Paper presented at the Games + Learning + Society 8.0, Madison, WI. on June 13 Sheldon, L. (2012). The Multiplayer Classroom : Designing Coursework as a Game. Boston, Mass.: Course Technology/Cengage Learning. • • • • • • • • • • Resources 19/12/2013 ACCP-CAID Gamification Master Class 16 © 2013 K.Becker