Charles Rennie Mackintosh

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Charles Rennie Mackintosh

  1. 1. Charles Rennie Mackintosh c1922. The E.O Hoppe Estate collection. Retrieved fromhttp://www.crmsociety.com/crmackintosh.aspx
  2. 2. Magnificent Mr• Mackintosh th Born on the 7 of June, 1868 in Glasgow, Scotland.• Famous architect, water colourist, designer and artist.• Married Margaret MacDonald, a Scottish artist and, along with Mackintosh, one of “The Four”.• Was diagnosed with throat and tongue cancer in 1927.• Died shortly after on the 10th of December, 1928 in London Unknown. [Photograph of Charles Rennie Mackintosh]. (1900). Retrieved from at the age of 60. http://flann4.files.wordpress.com/2008/03/crm.jpg
  3. 3. Education and After• Became an apprentice of John Hutchinson, a local architect, and enrolled in architecture and design night classes at the Glasgow School of Art to complement his training.• It was at the Glasgow School that Mackintosh gained access to the latest creative journals and consequently began to increase his knowledge of his contemporaries abroad.• He was recognized as a remarkable talent by the schools director, Fra Newbery, who would become a mentor figure to the young designer.• Received many student awards including the prestigious Alexander Thompson travelling scholarship which saw him embark on an architectural tour of Italy.
  4. 4. • Ended his apprenticeship with Hutchinson and became a draftsman at Honeyman and Keppie, a well-established architectural firm of which he was to become a partner. • It was around this time that he began to develop his own style and ideas related to design and architecture. • During a lecture in 1893, Mackintosh argued that architects and designers needed to be granted greater artistic freedom. It was then that he began developing designs for furniture, metalwork and the graphic arts alongside his architecture.Unknown. [Mackintosh Building at the Glasgow School of Arts]. (2008). Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow. Retrieved fromhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/glasgowschoolart/2945990995/in/set-72157608073078032/
  5. 5. InfluencesMackintosh, CR. (1902). Ladderback Chair. [Design Objects]. Museum of Modern Art, New York. Retrieved • His designs were influenced by the Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts movements, and were very much immersed in the realm of modernity. • Enjoyed incorporating floral patterns and Celtic art as decorative elements. • Interested in Japanese simplicity, style, functionality and use of materials. • United natural forms with a new designfrom ARTstor online database. vocabulary which differed greatly from the antique and classical inspirations of mainstream designers and architects.
  6. 6. Achievements and • Success style was quickly In Europe, the originality of Mackintoshs appreciated and he received much acclaim. • The most famous works Mackintosh completed during his career as a designer of various disciplines include the Glasgow School of Art, The Hill House, Scotland Street School, and a series of city-centre tea room interiors. • Was particularly well known for his belief surrounding the responsibility of the architect not only for exteriors, but for interiors too. It was in this way that he became famed for being a leader for the theory of the room as a work of art. • He is most recognised today as a designer of chairs, which, like all his work, possess a distinctly recognisable and unique style.Unknown. [Original Willow Tea Room Interior]. (1903). Retrieved from http://archiseek.com/2009/1903-willow-tea-rooms-sauchiehall-street-glasgow/#.UWU1gaLviSo
  7. 7. Continuing Influence • Mackintosh was a visionary designerRobinson, S. (2009). Charles Rennie Mackintosh-the Glasgow Legacy. RetrievedApril 10, 2013, from http://www.bath.ac.uk/news/2009/10/13/public-lecture- who had a profound influence on the Modern movement, a foundation of contemporary design. • He is seen as a central figure in the development of integrated art- architecture, and was a large influence on many architects and designers of the Post Modern movement in the 1970s and 1980s. • His furniture and textiles are being produced during our times withmackintosh/ notable success.
  8. 8. References• An Introduction to Charles Rennie Mackintosh. (2013). Retieved on April 10, 2013, from http://www.technologystudent.com/joints/rennie1.html• Charles Rennie Mackintosh: A Brief Chronology. (2013). Retrieved April 10, 2013, from http://www.huntsearch.gla.ac.uk/Mackintosh/biography.html• Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Encyclopedia of World Biography. 2004. Retrieved April 10, 2013 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G2-3404704090.html• CR Mackintosh: How it began. (2013). Retrieved April 10, 2013, from http://www.charlesrenniemac.co.uk/how-it-began/charles-rennie-mackintosh• The Charles Rennie Mackintosh society. (2000). “Charles Rennie Mackintosh”. Retrieved from: http://www.crmsociety.com/crmackintosh.aspx
  9. 9. References• Charles Rennie Mackintosh c1922. The E.O Hoppe Estate collection. Retrieved from http://www.crmsociety.com/crmackintosh.aspx• Mackintosh, CR. (1902). Ladderback Chair. [Design Objects]. Museum of Modern Art, New York. Retrieved from ARTstor online database• Unknown. [Mackintosh Building at the Glasgow School of Arts]. (2008). Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow. Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/glasgowschoolart/2945990995/in/set- 72157608073078032/• Unknown. [Original Willow Tea Room Interior]. (1903). Retrieved from http://archiseek.com/2009/1903- willow-tea-rooms-sauchiehall-street-glasgow/#.UWU1gaLviSo• Unknown. [Original Willow Tea Room Interior]. (1903). Retrieved from http://archiseek.com/2009/1903- willow-tea-rooms-sauchiehall-street-glasgow/#.UWU1gaLviSo• Unknown. [Photograph of Charles Rennie Mackintosh]. (1900). Retrieved from http://flann4.files.wordpress.com/2008/03/crm.jpg

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