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The Next Generation of Online Social Media Applications in Education
 

The Next Generation of Online Social Media Applications in Education

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Keynote address given at the International Conference on Hybrid Learning, August 2013

Keynote address given at the International Conference on Hybrid Learning, August 2013

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    The Next Generation of Online Social Media Applications in Education The Next Generation of Online Social Media Applications in Education Presentation Transcript

    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada “The Next Generation of Online Social Media Applications in Education” Bebo White SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Stanford University bebo@slac.stanford.edu
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada “Education and learning has and will always be a social activity because it involves transfer of knowledge between humans either directly or indirectly” “So in the end, education and learning is about communication and the ways that humans communicate”
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Agenda • Status of “Online Social Media Applications in Education” • What are the potential disruptive applications in the immediate future?
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada It remains a carefully craftedIt remains a carefully crafted blending of these elementsblending of these elements even with increasingeven with increasing technologytechnology It remains a carefully craftedIt remains a carefully crafted blending of these elementsblending of these elements even with increasingeven with increasing technologytechnology
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Primary focus is on communication, not learning (www.BestMastersinEducation.com) Moves conventional ideas and methods online
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada There is still too much emphasis on “Web 2.0”
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Some of my “hot (to be explored) list” of Future Social Media in Education Tools & Techniques • “Socially Shared Reading” • MOOCs • Gamification in Learning • Applications of “Social Machines” • Pervasive Learning/Embedded Ubiquitous Learning
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Isn’t this learning? Wouldn’t it be great to see Einstein’s marginalia? One of history’s greatestOne of history’s greatest research projects beganresearch projects began with notes in the marginwith notes in the margin of a bookof a book One of history’s greatestOne of history’s greatest research projects beganresearch projects began with notes in the marginwith notes in the margin of a bookof a book
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada We can collaborate (annotate, markup, version) documents Why not (non-destructively) reading assignments?
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada “Socially-Shared Reading” • Can be a future component of book publishing • Goes beyond book reviews or reports • Stimulates group/individual learning • Notes/annotations could become a permanent part of the book corpus
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada MOOCs
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Massive Open Online Course • A course that is open, participatory, distributed, and connects students to a digital world interested in the same topic • Provides a massive network of tools and people for students and educators to build their technology skills and professional networks for life-long learning • Have attracted media interest due to huge enrollments and the involvement of “elite” institutions
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada It’s the cMOOCs Where the Innovation Is (IMHO) • Based on connectivity • Enables learning networks • Each of the participants provides meaning by their own learning process • Each experience can be unique, chaotic, but no less rich or interesting
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada • In cMOOC communities • there is a single platform, or defined only material • there is not a single linear pathway if the contents are created from the contributions of all participating nodes • they are based on co-creation and generation of content rather than simple aggregation or replication • there is a learning community where the lines between teachers and students is blurred; the teacher might only be “the adult in the room”
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada • cMOOCs are not a panacea • They are suited to advanced learners who are comfortable online and used to sharing experiences online (e.g., users of blogs, wikis, Twitter, recommender systems, etc.)...Web 2.0? • Pedagogically, cMOOCs involve less transmission/interaction than xMOOCs • Peer assessment (crowdsourcing to manage MOOC scale) is hard!
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada • Who do they benefit - the students or the sponsoring institution? • How do they affect the future role of teachers? • Is it like the naiveté of the early Web or will they be monetized like other social media? • Connectivist or Instructivist? • Etc., etc. Will MOOCs survive & continue or just be a fad?
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Gamification • IT, games, and education will never go away - just get more sophisticated • The pedagogy is to use the design elements, interaction techniques, and (now) the social networking models of online games to leverage teaching and learning • Social gamification can explicit (Second Life?) or implicit (Foursquare)
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada (jmapsimoes, 2012)
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Why is It Still Relevant? • A generation that knows gaming • Successful game designers are experts in building motivation, interface design, user experience design; they are motivated themselves by the desire to reach as large an audience as possible • A matter of scale - audiences that MOOCs would envy • Variety of platforms - any place can be a learning space • Technology - powerful devices, ubiquitous broadband and wifi
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada 7 Game Motivation Principles • Experience bars measuring progress • Breaking things down into lots of long and short-termed calibrated aims • Reward even smallest efforts and don’t punish failure • Feedback - link actions and consequences • Uncertainly in getting rewards - different probability rates • Enhanced attention • Collaboration and competition (ref: Tom Chatfield) If you did not know I was talking about gam es...
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Pedagogical Elements of Gamification • “Learning by doing” • Alternatives to “test and letter grade” assessment • Collection of player metrics/competencies with ability to compare in peer/social group • Motivated to exchange information within their social group in order to achieve desired goals
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada You may think that I have dismissed Web 2.0’s role... What about The Semantic Web, Web 3.0, or whatever? It’s “Social Machines for Education”
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada “real life is an must be full of all kinds of social constraint – the very process from which society arises. Computers can help if we use them to create social machines on the “real life is an must be full of all kinds of social constraint – the very process from which society arises. Computers can help if we use them to create social machines on the Web: processes in which the people do the work and the machine does the administration…The stage is set for an evolutionary growth of new social engines.”: processes in which the people do the work and the machine does the administration…The stage is set for an evolutionary growth of new social engines.” ---Sir Tim Berners-Lee It is hard to imagine a more fundamental construct to the growth of a society than education...
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada This is a “Fourth Quadrant” Concept
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Consider the potential of any subset of these in a “Social Machine for Education!”
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Pervasive Learning “learning at the speed of need through formal, informal and social learning modalities” Pervasive: “having the quality or tendency to pervade or permeate”
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada What About the “Web of Things?” • Everyday objects become “first class citizens” on the Web via sensors or other embedded devices • Why not also members (and friends) in social networks? • Why can’t such objects be a part of a Personal Learning Network Network?
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Ubiquitous Embedded Learning • Discovery and delivery - “learning at the speed of need” • Machine to Machine (M2M) communication - “learning profiles” accessible by machines • Embedded Learning - networked learning is built into every device, tool, etc. • The Web 2.0 components may already be here
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Blogjects - objects that blog (Julian Bleeker, USC)
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Spimes - “a location-aware, environment-aware, self-logging, self-documenting, uniquely identified object that flings off data about itself and its environment in great quantities” (Bruce Sterling)
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada “The significance of technologies like RFID and 2D barcoding is that they offer a low-impact way to ‘import’ physical objects into the datasphere, to endow them with an informational shadow” (Adam Greenfield)
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada What are the challenges of integrating Web 2.0 social learning with the “Web of Things?”
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Summary • Social media applications in education need to move beyond the familiar Web 2.0 models • Rich new and innovative social media technologies have been developed but require definition of new educational models and pedagogies to support them • Many of the longterm dreams of “classrooms without walls,” approachable distant education (removing the digital divide), and lifelong learning are now possible and social interaction is a major component of them
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada None of the concepts discussed in this talk appear in this book They should be! Help us to build the next edition!
    • ICHL 2013, Toronto Canada Questions/Comments? bebo@slac.stanford.edu