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Han

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  • Transcript

    • 1. The Han of China
    • 2. Location
    • 3. LocationGenerally located in China and South-East Asia
    • 4. Location Generally located in China and South-East Asia92% of Mainland Chinese and 20% of the world identify as Han
    • 5. Location Generally located in China and South-East Asia 92% of Mainland Chinese and 20% of the world identify as HanHan population > 1 million: 10 countries, > 100,000: at least 15 more
    • 6. Location Generally located in China and South-East Asia 92% of Mainland Chinese and 20% of the world identify as HanHan population > 1 million: 10 countries, > 100,000: at least 15 more
    • 7. Language
    • 8. LanguageMandarin Chinese (Putonghua)is the official language of China,Taiwan, and Singapore
    • 9. LanguageMandarin Chinese (Putonghua)is the official language of China,Taiwan, and SingaporeNon-phonetic (pictograph/ideograph) writing systemconsisting of ~60,000 characters,~5000 used in daily life
    • 10. LanguageMandarin Chinese (Putonghua)is the official language of China,Taiwan, and SingaporeNon-phonetic (pictograph/ideograph) writing systemconsisting of ~60,000 characters,~5000 used in daily lifeTonal language: rising/fallingtones provide different meanings
    • 11. LanguageMandarin Chinese (Putonghua)is the official language of China,Taiwan, and SingaporeNon-phonetic (pictograph/ideograph) writing systemconsisting of ~60,000 characters,~5000 used in daily lifeTonal language: rising/fallingtones provide different meaningsRegional Dialects include Yue(Cantonese) and Wu(Shanghainese) which can beunintelligible to each other
    • 12. LanguageMandarin Chinese (Putonghua)is the official language of China,Taiwan, and SingaporeNon-phonetic (pictograph/ideograph) writing systemconsisting of ~60,000 characters,~5000 used in daily lifeTonal language: rising/fallingtones provide different meaningsRegional Dialects include Yue(Cantonese) and Wu(Shanghainese) which can beunintelligible to each other
    • 13. Subsistence + Adaptation
    • 14. Subsistence + AdaptationRice is a dietary staple.
    • 15. Subsistence + AdaptationRice is a dietary staple.Wheat is grown in dry areas whererice is not an option.
    • 16. Subsistence + AdaptationRice is a dietary staple.Wheat is grown in dry areas whererice is not an option.Feeding the large population is one ofthe biggest economic challengesChina is facing.
    • 17. Subsistence + AdaptationRice is a dietary staple.Wheat is grown in dry areas whererice is not an option.Feeding the large population is one ofthe biggest economic challengesChina is facing.
    • 18. Subsistence + AdaptationRice is a dietary staple.Wheat is grown in dry areas whererice is not an option.Feeding the large population is one ofthe biggest economic challengesChina is facing.50% of the 700 million strong labor-force works inagriculture.
    • 19. Subsistence + AdaptationRice is a dietary staple.Wheat is grown in dry areas whererice is not an option.Feeding the large population is one ofthe biggest economic challengesChina is facing.50% of the 700 million strong labor-force works inagriculture.By improving irrigation technology and limitingpopulation through one-child policies, they hope toalleviate the problem of feeding so many people.
    • 20. Religion + Spirituality
    • 21. Religion + SpiritualityOfficial State Religion: AtheismShenism (Chinese Folk Religion): Encompasses Taoism and “Shen” worship (regional/ethnic deities, heroes and ancestors, figures of Chinese mythology) Popular Figures recently: Mazu (Goddess of the Sea) Huangdi (Divine Patriarch of all Chinese) The Black Dragon Cai-Shen (God of Prosperity)
    • 22. Religion + SpiritualityOfficial State Religion: AtheismShenism (Chinese Folk Religion): Encompasses Taoism and “Shen” worship (regional/ethnic deities, heroes and ancestors, figures of Chinese mythology) 20% Popular Figures recently: 47% Mazu (Goddess of the Sea) Huangdi (Divine Patriarch of all Chinese) 30% The Black Dragon Cai-Shen (God of Prosperity)
    • 23. Religion + SpiritualityOfficial State Religion: Atheism Non-Religious Taoism Buddhism IslamShenism (Chinese Folk Religion): Christianity Encompasses Taoism and “Shen” worship (regional/ethnic deities, heroes and ancestors, figures of Chinese mythology) 20% Popular Figures recently: 47% Mazu (Goddess of the Sea) Huangdi (Divine Patriarch of all Chinese) 30% The Black Dragon Cai-Shen (God of Prosperity)
    • 24. Places of Worship
    • 25. Places of WorshipTaoist temples are adorned with images of gods and dragons. The interior usually consists of acourtyard, a main hall with an altar where offerings are placed, and sometimes small shrines tovarious deities.
    • 26. Places of WorshipTaoist temples are adorned with images of gods and dragons. The interior usually consists of acourtyard, a main hall with an altar where offerings are placed, and sometimes small shrines tovarious deities.Buddhist temples incorporate pagodas and display statues of the Buddha
    • 27. Places of WorshipTaoist temples are adorned with images of gods and dragons. The interior usually consists of acourtyard, a main hall with an altar where offerings are placed, and sometimes small shrines tovarious deities.Buddhist temples incorporate pagodas and display statues of the Buddha
    • 28. Places of WorshipTaoist temples are adorned with images of gods and dragons. The interior usually consists of acourtyard, a main hall with an altar where offerings are placed, and sometimes small shrines tovarious deities.Buddhist temples incorporate pagodas and display statues of the Buddha
    • 29. Places of WorshipTaoist temples are adorned with images of gods and dragons. The interior usually consists of acourtyard, a main hall with an altar where offerings are placed, and sometimes small shrines tovarious deities.Buddhist temples incorporate pagodas and display statues of the Buddha
    • 30. Places of WorshipTaoist temples are adorned with images of gods and dragons. The interior usually consists of acourtyard, a main hall with an altar where offerings are placed, and sometimes small shrines tovarious deities.Buddhist temples incorporate pagodas and display statues of the Buddha
    • 31. Places of WorshipTaoist temples are adorned with images of gods and dragons. The interior usually consists of acourtyard, a main hall with an altar where offerings are placed, and sometimes small shrines tovarious deities.Buddhist temples incorporate pagodas and display statues of the Buddha
    • 32. Places of WorshipTaoist temples are adorned with images of gods and dragons. The interior usually consists of acourtyard, a main hall with an altar where offerings are placed, and sometimes small shrines tovarious deities.Buddhist temples incorporate pagodas and display statues of the Buddha
    • 33. Cultural Traditions
    • 34. Cultural TraditionsIndividual prayer/meditation isoften done through physicalactivities:
    • 35. Cultural TraditionsIndividual prayer/meditation isoften done through physicalactivities: Wushu (Kung Fu)
    • 36. Cultural TraditionsIndividual prayer/meditation isoften done through physicalactivities: Wushu (Kung Fu) Kung Fu
    • 37. Cultural TraditionsIndividual prayer/meditation isoften done through physicalactivities: Wushu (Kung Fu) Kung Fu Taijiquan (Tai Chi)
    • 38. Cultural TraditionsIndividual prayer/meditation isoften done through physicalactivities: Wushu (Kung Fu) Kung Fu Taijiquan (Tai Chi) Tai Chi
    • 39. Cultural TraditionsIndividual prayer/meditation isoften done through physicalactivities: Wushu (Kung Fu) Kung Fu Taijiquan (Tai Chi) Tai Chi Qigong (Breathing technique)
    • 40. Cultural TraditionsIndividual prayer/meditation isoften done through physicalactivities: Wushu (Kung Fu) Kung Fu Taijiquan (Tai Chi) Tai Chi Qigong (Breathing technique) Qigong
    • 41. Cultural Traditions
    • 42. Cultural TraditionsThe Spring Festival celebrates the Chinese New Year foraround 2 weeks.
    • 43. Cultural TraditionsThe Spring Festival celebrates the Chinese New Year foraround 2 weeks. It is a time to visit family and get together with friends.
    • 44. Cultural TraditionsThe Spring Festival celebrates the Chinese New Year foraround 2 weeks. It is a time to visit family and get together with friends. Elaborate festivities are held including parades, gift- exchanging, fireworks, and large family meals.
    • 45. Cultural TraditionsThe Spring Festival celebrates the Chinese New Year foraround 2 weeks. It is a time to visit family and get together with friends. Elaborate festivities are held including parades, gift- exchanging, fireworks, and large family meals. Actions performed seek to gain the respect and recognition of ancestors and deities that would help the family in the upcoming year.
    • 46. Cultural TraditionsThe Spring Festival celebrates the Chinese New Year foraround 2 weeks. It is a time to visit family and get together with friends. Elaborate festivities are held including parades, gift- exchanging, fireworks, and large family meals. Actions performed seek to gain the respect and recognition of ancestors and deities that would help the family in the upcoming year. Short video on the Spring Festival
    • 47. Kinship SystemPatrilineal based society with great respect for elders. Women typically move into their husband’s family’s home after marriage. It is the oldest son’s responsibility to take care of his aging relatives. Males are placed above females at home, and in the business world. Over the last few decades, changing roles have helped improve the status of women.Monogamous relationships Legal age for marriage is 20 for women and 22 for men. In 1949, women gained the right to choose their own husband and file for divorce. Still difficult to get a divorce, but it is more common than it was.The oldest offspring inherits the land/money from their parents.Extended family is very important. Even distant family members are valued higher than outsiders. Continuation of the family name is of the highest importance. Several generations of extended family members usually live together.
    • 48. Political Framework
    • 49. Political FrameworkOrganized as People’s Republic ofChina (PRC) in 1949, whenCommunists forced the Koumintang toflee to Taiwan.
    • 50. Political FrameworkOrganized as People’s Republic ofChina (PRC) in 1949, whenCommunists forced the Koumintang toflee to Taiwan. Increasingly reformist economic policy since 1978 has opened the economy to a more market-based system.
    • 51. Political FrameworkOrganized as People’s Republic ofChina (PRC) in 1949, whenCommunists forced the Koumintang toflee to Taiwan. Increasingly reformist economic policy since 1978 has opened the economy to a more market-based system. Still strict of graphic art, literature, and performance art.
    • 52. Political FrameworkOrganized as People’s Republic ofChina (PRC) in 1949, whenCommunists forced the Koumintang toflee to Taiwan. Increasingly reformist economic policy since 1978 has opened the economy to a more market-based system. Still strict of graphic art, literature, and performance art. No criticism of the government or the Communist Party is allowed through regulation and censorship.
    • 53. Political FrameworkOrganized as People’s Republic ofChina (PRC) in 1949, whenCommunists forced the Koumintang toflee to Taiwan. Increasingly reformist economic policy since 1978 has opened the economy to a more market-based system. Still strict of graphic art, literature, and performance art. No criticism of the government or the Communist Party is allowed through regulation and censorship.
    • 54. Political FrameworkOrganized as People’s Republic ofChina (PRC) in 1949, whenCommunists forced the Koumintang toflee to Taiwan. Increasingly reformist economic policy since 1978 has opened the economy to a more market-based system. Still strict of graphic art, literature, and performance art. No criticism of the government or the Communist Party is allowed through regulation and censorship.
    • 55. Social Stratification
    • 56. Social StratificationTypical Confucian hierarchy: Communist Change: Scholars Professed ideals of a classless society Farmers In reality two separate classes: Artisans Ganbu (Political Leaders) Merchants Peasant Masses SoldiersAlong with ancestor worship, respect for According to the Communists, bothelders, and placing women in subordinate groups have the same interests androles. should work in unison to achieve their goals.
    • 57. Social Stratification Typical Confucian hierarchy: Communist Change: Scholars Professed ideals of a classless society Farmers In reality two separate classes: Artisans Ganbu (Political Leaders) Merchants Peasant Masses Soldiers Along with ancestor worship, respect for According to the Communists, both elders, and placing women in subordinate groups have the same interests and roles. should work in unison to achieve their goals. A growing divide between the rich and poor has been developing.The rich live in houses in the city, while the poor are typically relegated to the countryside and overcrowded slums.Cars are becoming a defining status symbol for the rich, often coming a perks from distinguished government jobs.
    • 58. Global Relations
    • 59. Global RelationsOver the last few decades, China has opened to the globaleconomy, leading to intense development and globalization.
    • 60. Global RelationsOver the last few decades, China has opened to the globaleconomy, leading to intense development and globalization.China’s economy is one of the fastest developing in the world.
    • 61. Global RelationsOver the last few decades, China has opened to the globaleconomy, leading to intense development and globalization.China’s economy is one of the fastest developing in the world.There is a potential for future conflict due to independencemovements in Tibet and Taiwan, and other countries inSoutheast Asia.
    • 62. Global RelationsOver the last few decades, China has opened to the globaleconomy, leading to intense development and globalization.China’s economy is one of the fastest developing in the world.There is a potential for future conflict due to independencemovements in Tibet and Taiwan, and other countries inSoutheast Asia.The environmental issue is a big concern after decades ofunregulated industrial growth.
    • 63. Global RelationsOver the last few decades, China has opened to the globaleconomy, leading to intense development and globalization.China’s economy is one of the fastest developing in the world.There is a potential for future conflict due to independencemovements in Tibet and Taiwan, and other countries inSoutheast Asia.The environmental issue is a big concern after decades ofunregulated industrial growth.Economic downturn in the US and the rest of the world has leadto a decrease in exports for China. (US is China’s highestconsumer market).

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