Aluminum Group

2,374
-1

Published on

Published in: Business, News & Politics
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,374
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Aluminum Group

  1. 1. Aluminum Group By Brad & Jeremy
  2. 2. Aluminum Group http://www.vcs.ethz.ch/chemglobe/ptoe/periodic.gif
  3. 3. Elements <ul><li>B Boron </li></ul><ul><li>Al Aluminum </li></ul><ul><li>Ga Gallium </li></ul><ul><li>In Indium </li></ul><ul><li>Tl Thallium </li></ul><ul><li>Uut Ununtrium </li></ul>
  4. 4. Common Traits <ul><li>Except for boron and ununtrium, all of the elements in the Aluminum group are soft metals that are silver-white or silver-grey in color. </li></ul><ul><li>None of the elements are found by themselves in nature. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Boron <ul><li>Symbol – B </li></ul><ul><li>Group – Semi-metal </li></ul><ul><li>Atomic Mass – 10.811 </li></ul><ul><li>Discovered by - Sir H. Davy, J.L. Gay-Lussac, L.J. Thénard </li></ul><ul><li>Year - 1808 </li></ul>
  6. 6. Common Uses <ul><li>Boron is used in pyrotechnic flares to provide a distinctive green color, and in rockets as an igniter. </li></ul><ul><li>Boron-10 is used as a control for nuclear reactors, as a shield for nuclear radiation, and in instruments used for detecting neutrons. </li></ul><ul><li>Used with titanium & tungsten to make heat resistant alloys for jets & rockets. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Boron Information <ul><li>Chemically, Boron is closer to silicon than to the rest of the elements in the group. </li></ul><ul><li>Boron is an essential mineral for plants. </li></ul><ul><li>We ingest about 2 milligrams of boron each day from food. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Boron Thermal Information <ul><li>Melting point: 2079 °C </li></ul><ul><li>Boiling point: 4000 °C </li></ul><ul><li>Specific heat: 1.02 J/gK </li></ul><ul><li>Heat of fusion: 50.20 kJ/mol </li></ul>
  9. 9. Boron Isotopes <ul><li>Boron-10 Half-life: stable Mass: 10.0129 19.7% abundance </li></ul><ul><li>Boron-11 Half-life: stable Mass: 11.0093 80.3% abundance </li></ul>
  10. 10. Aluminum <ul><li>Symbol – Al </li></ul><ul><li>Group – Metal </li></ul><ul><li>Atomic Mass – 26.981539 </li></ul><ul><li>Discovered by – Hans Christian Oersted </li></ul><ul><li>Year - 1825 </li></ul>
  11. 11. Did You Know… <ul><li>Aluminum is pronounced and spelled “Aluminium” in other countries? </li></ul>
  12. 12. Common Uses <ul><li>Aluminum is used for many things including: </li></ul><ul><li>Soda Cans </li></ul><ul><li>Airplanes </li></ul>
  13. 13. Aluminum Information <ul><li>Aluminum is to reactive to occur in nature by itself. The most common ore is Bauxite (Al 2 O 3 .2H 2 O) </li></ul><ul><li>In its purest form, Aluminum is soft and weak, so alloys with small amounts of copper, magnesium, silicon, and manganese are used. </li></ul><ul><li>Aluminum is the most abundant metal and third most abundant element in the Earth’s crust. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Aluminum Thermal Information <ul><li>Melting point: 660.37 °C </li></ul><ul><li>Boiling point: 2519 °C </li></ul><ul><li>Specific heat: 0.90 J/gK </li></ul><ul><li>Heat of fusion: 10.790 kJ/mol </li></ul>
  15. 15. Aluminum Isotopes <ul><li>Aluminum-26 Half-life: 7.5e03y Mass: 25.9868 0% abundance </li></ul><ul><li>Aluminum-27 Half-life: stable Mass: 26.9815 100% abundance </li></ul><ul><li>Aluminum-28 Half-life: 2.25m Mass: 28 0% abundance </li></ul>
  16. 16. Gallium <ul><li>Symbol – Ga </li></ul><ul><li>Group – Metal </li></ul><ul><li>Atomic Mass – 69.723 </li></ul><ul><li>Discovered by – Paul Émile Lecoq de Boisbaudran </li></ul><ul><li>Year - 1875 </li></ul>
  17. 17. Indium <ul><li>Symbol – In </li></ul><ul><li>Group – Metal </li></ul><ul><li>Atomic Mass – 114.818 </li></ul><ul><li>Discovered by – Ferdinand Reich, T. Richter </li></ul><ul><li>Year - 1863 </li></ul>
  18. 18. Thallium <ul><li>Symbol – Tl </li></ul><ul><li>Group – Metal </li></ul><ul><li>Atomic Mass – 204.3833 </li></ul><ul><li>Discovered by – Sir William Crookes </li></ul><ul><li>Year - 1861 </li></ul>
  19. 19. Ununtrium <ul><li>Symbol – Uut </li></ul><ul><li>Group – Metal </li></ul><ul><li>Atomic Mass – (284) </li></ul><ul><li>Discovered by – Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA and Dubna in Russia </li></ul><ul><li>Year - 2004 </li></ul>
  20. 20. Ununtrium Information <ul><li>Approximately 4 atoms of Uut have ever been made. </li></ul><ul><li>They decayed through the emission of alpha particles from element 115 (Uup). </li></ul>
  21. 21. Image
  22. 22. Bibliography <ul><li>http://scifun.chem.wisc.edu/CHEMWEEK/Aluminum/ALUMINUM.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/Al/key.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.vcs.ethz.ch/chemglobe/ptoe/_/13.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/B/key.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.vcs.ethz.ch/chemglobe/ptoe/_/5.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://pearl1.lanl.gov/periodic/elements/5.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.chemsoc.org/viselements/pages/boron.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.vcs.ethz.ch/chemglobe/ptoe/_/31.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.vcs.ethz.ch/chemglobe/ptoe/_/49.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.vcs.ethz.ch/chemglobe/ptoe/_/81.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/Uut/key.html </li></ul>

×