Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
A case for missional Lutheran education
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

A case for missional Lutheran education

903
views

Published on

Published in: Education, Spiritual

3 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Gee, if I had known you hadn't presented this yet, I may not have offered up the challenges. I hope it doesn't taint your thoughts.

    Down a more constructive path of discussion, I'd like to hear more about finding/producing teachers that fit your definition of missional. Do we need a mentoring program like the LCMS has used to identify and develop future principals? How can we do this better? How does the LCMS call system suit this?

    Then another challenge that could be worthy of further study... What happens in the second generation of a missional school when those teachers/leaders who had the great zeal in the foundation years of the school move on? What can be done in the foundational years to keep the school from becoming a private school with a Lutheran past?
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Excellent food for thought...and action, Tim! I am not actually presenting this until today, so now I get to use your post as part o the presentation :-).
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Many good and proper distinctions presented here, especially between parochial and missional teachers. Wishing I was there to hear you expound on this.

    For the sake of making an interesting discussion, I'll toss out some challenges from my own experience in a missional Lutheran school in Western Australia. Keep in mind that I do have many positives I could share, too.

    One concern I have with an emphasis on 'missional schools' is that I'm not convinced that it matters that an institution is missional. It's the people that are missional - teachers, pastors/chaplains, students, administrators, board members, parents, etc. Both parochial schools and missional schools can be 'missional'. In the missional schools, the mission often happens on the campus. In parochial schools, the mission often happens off campus in the daily lives of its school community members. And yet, neither parochial or missional schools might be missional if you don't have missional people.

    Secondly, missional Lutheran schools are expensive endeavours that may not be an efficient use of mission investments in terms of dollars and people. Consider your definition of a missional Lutheran teacher. How many of these teachers do we have? To pack a missional Lutheran staff in a school like mine with 100+ teachers (1,100 students) would be quite a drain on the Lutheran teacher supply of the Lutheran Church of Australia which only graduates a handful of Lutheran teachers each year. Instead, our school recruits a very small number of Lutheran teachers (5%?) and employs the rest from the local supply of Christian and mostly non-Christian teachers. Then we expect these non-Christian teachers (50%) to help us grow our Lutheran ethos amidst a student population with a similar ratio of Lutherans-Other Christians-Non Christians. We have a missional school, but not missional people.

    Thirdly, missional schools are unlikely to ever produce the quality and number of professional church workers that parochial Lutheran schools traditionally have produced. Without the teachers, we won't be able to adequately staff missional schools.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
903
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
3
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Transcript

    • 1. A Case for MissionalLutheran Education Seek, support, and shape missional Lutheran education around the world.
    • 2. “The
School
of
Educa/on
will
 seek,
support,
and
shape
missional
Lutheran
educa/on
 around
the
world.”
    • 3. 1. define missional Lutheran education2. distinguish between parochial and missional Lutheran education3. create plans to seek, support, and shape missional Lutheran education around the world
    • 4. What is parochial education?
    • 5. What is parochial education?• A parochial school is a school that provides religious education.• A parochial schools is a school that is run or supported by a religious organization.
    • 6. Parochial SchoolTarget Students
    • 7. Parochial School Target Students• those within the religious tradition• anyone willing to respect the religious tradition• critical mass of students from the religious tradition• cultural or ethic communities
    • 8. Parochial School Curriculum
    • 9. Parochial School Curriculum• secular subjects + religion classes
    • 10. Parochial School Curriculum• secular subjects + religion classes• secular subjects + religion classes + ceremonies, rituals, practices, Christian conduct code
    • 11. Parochial School Curriculum• secular subjects + religion classes• secular subjects + religion classes + ceremonies, rituals, practices, Christian conduct code• supplement to the family religious instruction
    • 12. Parochial School Curriculum• secular subjects + religion classes• secular subjects + religion classes + ceremonies, rituals, practices, Christian conduct code• supplement to the family religious instruction• surface, integrate, and teach faith issues in content area
    • 13. Parochial School Curriculum• secular subjects + religion classes• secular subjects + religion classes + ceremonies, rituals, practices, Christian conduct code• supplement to the family religious instruction• surface, integrate, and teach faith issues in content area• faith formation learning outcomes
    • 14. Parochial School Curriculum• secular subjects + religion classes• secular subjects + religion classes + ceremonies, rituals, practices, Christian conduct code• supplement to the family religious instruction• surface, integrate, and teach faith issues in content area• faith formation learning outcomes• community is the curriculum
    • 15. Parochial School Teachers
    • 16. Parochial School Teachers• practicing member within the religious tradition
    • 17. Parochial School Teachers• practicing member within the religious tradition• general assent to the teachings of the religious tradition
    • 18. Parochial School Teachers• practicing member within the religious tradition• general assent to the teachings of the religious tradition• religious tradition certification
    • 19. Parochial School Teachers• practicing member within the religious tradition• general assent to the teachings of the religious tradition• religious tradition certification• commitment to living and teaching that is rooted in the religious tradition
    • 20. Parochial School Teachers• practicing member within the religious tradition• general assent to the teachings of the religious tradition• religious tradition certification• commitment to living and teaching that is rooted in the religious tradition• specialized theological training alongside standard teacher education training
    • 21. Parochial School Teachers• practicing member within the religious tradition• general assent to the teachings of the religious tradition• religious tradition certification• commitment to living and teaching that is rooted in the religious tradition• specialized theological training alongside standard teacher education training• a blend of the above / other
    • 22. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 23. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. 94% of the respondents had some level of agreement with the statement that, “A teacher in a Lutheran school is responsible for teaching his/her subjects from a Christian perspective.” Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 24. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. 94% of the respondents had some level of agreement with the statement that, “A teacher in a Lutheran school is responsible for teaching his/her subjects from a Christian perspective.” • 82% agreed that a Lutheran teacher “is responsible to be able to explain Lutheran doctrine.” Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 25. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. 94% of the respondents had some level of agreement with the statement that, “A teacher in a Lutheran school is responsible for teaching his/her subjects from a Christian perspective.” • 82% agreed that a Lutheran teacher “is responsible to be able to explain Lutheran doctrine.” • A majority thought that the teacher in a Lutheran school may be responsible for teaching doctrine to adults. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 26. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. 94% of the respondents had some level of agreement with the statement that, “A teacher in a Lutheran school is responsible for teaching his/her subjects from a Christian perspective.” • 82% agreed that a Lutheran teacher “is responsible to be able to explain Lutheran doctrine.” • A majority thought that the teacher in a Lutheran school may be responsible for teaching doctrine to adults. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 27. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 28. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • 24% disagreed that “It is important that a teacher in a Lutheran school be Lutheran.” Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 29. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • 24% disagreed that “It is important that a teacher in a Lutheran school be Lutheran.” • 11% thought that being a long-term LCMS member was adequate (rather than additional theological training). Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 30. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • 24% disagreed that “It is important that a teacher in a Lutheran school be Lutheran.” • 11% thought that being a long-term LCMS member was adequate (rather than additional theological training). • 52% agreed that “The role of the teacher is less valued today than in former years.” Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 31. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • 24% disagreed that “It is important that a teacher in a Lutheran school be Lutheran.” • 11% thought that being a long-term LCMS member was adequate (rather than additional theological training). • 52% agreed that “The role of the teacher is less valued today than in former years.” • 88% agreed that “A Lutheran school helps a Lutheran congregation achieve its ministry objectives. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 32. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 33. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • 40% of administrators disagreed that college-level Lutheran doctrine training was important. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 34. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • 40% of administrators disagreed that college-level Lutheran doctrine training was important. • 71% agreed that a classroom teacher in a Lutheran school “needs significantly more theological training that the average laypersons.” Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 35. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • 40% of administrators disagreed that college-level Lutheran doctrine training was important. • 71% agreed that a classroom teacher in a Lutheran school “needs significantly more theological training that the average laypersons.” • 68% disagreed that college-level Lutheran doctrine was necessary for teachers below first grade, where 83% disagreed with the same statement if teaching below sixth grade. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 36. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • 40% of administrators disagreed that college-level Lutheran doctrine training was important. • 71% agreed that a classroom teacher in a Lutheran school “needs significantly more theological training that the average laypersons.” • 68% disagreed that college-level Lutheran doctrine was necessary for teachers below first grade, where 83% disagreed with the same statement if teaching below sixth grade. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 37. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • 40% of administrators disagreed that college-level Lutheran doctrine training was important. • 71% agreed that a classroom teacher in a Lutheran school “needs significantly more theological training that the average laypersons.” • 68% disagreed that college-level Lutheran doctrine was necessary for teachers below first grade, where 83% disagreed with the same statement if teaching below sixth grade. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve: The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 38. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University.
    • 39. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • “It is desirable that a teacher in a Lutheran classroom be ‘called’ or be eligible to be ‘called’” - 22% disagreed. 
    • 40. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • “It is desirable that a teacher in a Lutheran classroom be ‘called’ or be eligible to be ‘called’” - 22% disagreed.  • 37% of the administrators surveyed disagreed with this statement.
    • 41. Stueve, H. (2008). Called to serve:The perceptions of the value of theologically trained teachers in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Fielding Graduate University. • “It is desirable that a teacher in a Lutheran classroom be ‘called’ or be eligible to be ‘called’” - 22% disagreed.  • 37% of the administrators surveyed disagreed with this statement. • “The LCMS values the role of the teacher in the ministry of the church today.” -53% of the administrators and 45% of the teachers were not sure
    • 42. The future of the parochialLutheran education ministry is uncertain.
    • 43. Greatest growth is occurring inwhat some are calling “Missional Lutheran Education”
    • 44. Missional Lutheran Education - Target Students / Families
    • 45. Missional Lutheran Education - Target Students / Families• characterized by low percentage of students who are Lutheran and/or Christian
    • 46. Missional Curriculum
    • 47. Missional Curriculum• families usually enroll for something other than the religious instruction
    • 48. Missional Curriculum• families usually enroll for something other than the religious instruction• religious instruction does not assume prior knowledge or experiences
    • 49. Missional Curriculum• families usually enroll for something other than the religious instruction• religious instruction does not assume prior knowledge or experiences• secular and sacred tension - often due to outside agencies
    • 50. Missional Curriculum• families usually enroll for something other than the religious instruction• religious instruction does not assume prior knowledge or experiences• secular and sacred tension - often due to outside agencies• inquiry-based learning faith formation - experience precedes explanation
    • 51. Missional Curriculum• families usually enroll for something other than the religious instruction• religious instruction does not assume prior knowledge or experiences• secular and sacred tension - often due to outside agencies• inquiry-based learning faith formation - experience precedes explanation• differentiation of religious instruction is essential
    • 52. Missional Curriculum• families usually enroll for something other than the religious instruction• religious instruction does not assume prior knowledge or experiences• secular and sacred tension - often due to outside agencies• inquiry-based learning faith formation - experience precedes explanation• differentiation of religious instruction is essential• religious instruction embedded within the curriculum, helping students to see, in concrete ways, how the Lutheran faith informs their understanding of the subject, life, and the world
    • 53. Missional Curriculum• families usually enroll for something other than the religious instruction• religious instruction does not assume prior knowledge or experiences• secular and sacred tension - often due to outside agencies• inquiry-based learning faith formation - experience precedes explanation• differentiation of religious instruction is essential• religious instruction embedded within the curriculum, helping students to see, in concrete ways, how the Lutheran faith informs their understanding of the subject, life, and the world• informal faith formation opportunities are seen as an essential part of the “curriculum” - more than the classroom
    • 54. Missional LutheranEducation Teachers / Missionaries What does it take to be a highly effective teaching minister in a missional Lutheran educational ministry?
    • 55. Missional LutheranEducation Teachers / Missionaries
    • 56. Missional Lutheran Education Teachers / Missionaries1. clearly and convincingly communicate the vision and purposes of missional Lutheran education
    • 57. Missional Lutheran Education Teachers / Missionaries1. clearly and convincingly communicate the vision and purposes of missional Lutheran education2. competence and confidence on “cross cultural” communication and collaboration
    • 58. Missional Lutheran Education Teachers / Missionaries1. clearly and convincingly communicate the vision and purposes of missional Lutheran education2. competence and confidence on “cross cultural” communication and collaboration3. passion and commitment to the mission rather than simple assent
    • 59. Missional Lutheran Education Teachers / Missionaries1. clearly and convincingly communicate the vision and purposes of missional Lutheran education2. competence and confidence on “cross cultural” communication and collaboration3. passion and commitment to the mission rather than simple assent4. specialized Lutheran theological training that includes things like apologetics, evangelism, world religions, and world view studies
    • 60. Missional Lutheran Education Teachers / Missionaries1. clearly and convincingly communicate the vision and purposes of missional Lutheran education2. competence and confidence on “cross cultural” communication and collaboration3. passion and commitment to the mission rather than simple assent4. specialized Lutheran theological training that includes things like apologetics, evangelism, world religions, and world view studies5. deep understanding of how this theology informs study of seemingly secular content areas
    • 61. Missional Lutheran Education Teachers / Missionaries1. clearly and convincingly communicate the vision and purposes of missional Lutheran education2. competence and confidence on “cross cultural” communication and collaboration3. passion and commitment to the mission rather than simple assent4. specialized Lutheran theological training that includes things like apologetics, evangelism, world religions, and world view studies5. deep understanding of how this theology informs study of seemingly secular content areas6. understanding of faith development and teaching learners with limited or no prior knowledge
    • 62. Missional Lutheran Education Teachers / Missionaries1. clearly and convincingly communicate the vision and purposes of missional Lutheran education2. competence and confidence on “cross cultural” communication and collaboration3. passion and commitment to the mission rather than simple assent4. specialized Lutheran theological training that includes things like apologetics, evangelism, world religions, and world view studies5. deep understanding of how this theology informs study of seemingly secular content areas6. understanding of faith development and teaching learners with limited or no prior knowledge7. high competence and confidence in content, pedagogy, learning experience design, and digital age learning experiences
    • 63. “The
School
of
Educa/on
will
 seek,
support,
and
shape
missional
Lutheran
educa/on
 around
the
world.”