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Design driven innovation 1182010 (pp-tshare)

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I created this presentation as a synthesis of current thinking on innovation and design to help explain how a designers way of thinking might help business in its pursuit of innovation.

I created this presentation as a synthesis of current thinking on innovation and design to help explain how a designers way of thinking might help business in its pursuit of innovation.

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  • For 20 + years there has been general agreement within the design community that the term design-thinking is defined by the way a designer thinks when approaching opportunity identification, problem framing and solution creation. There is an on-going and lively debate around where design-thinking applies in product development. Some believe that design-thinking is an organizational-wide innovation imperative, some proponents view it as a strategic innovation planning activity, and others define it more directly to the creation of products, services and experiences. More recently, design-thinking has gained attention in business as a new and improved way to increase the overall speed and impact of innovation initiatives.
  • Roger Martin, Dean of the Rotman Business School at the University of Toronto is one of the people helping to blur the lines between business and design. His school has a course dedicated to “Design Thinking” and he often speaks about the need for businesses to think more like designers. Instead of acting on what is certain, designers bet on what is probable… suggesting that something may be and then exploring it.
  • Bruce Nussbaum, who writes a great blog for Business Week is one of many who have been noticing a new field that many are calling “Design Thinking.” While the principles are not new, senior management are becoming more interested in applying these approaches. He isn’t a huge fan of the term “design thinking”… he suggests calling it “Banana,” because of some of the connotations that “design” and “thinking” have, but none-the-less the opportunity to blend the disciplines and work together to find solutions is something that he sees as important.
  • It is about immersing yourself in the data and ideally in the world in which you are trying to address…
  • It isn’t simply iterating and building ideas within a team that is important… moving ideas around and having different disciplines involved is also important. (IF plug)
  • There is an on-going and lively debate around where design-thinking applies in product development. Some believe that design-thinking is an organizational-wide innovation imperative, some proponents view it as a strategic innovation planning activity, and others define it more directly to the creation of products, services and experiences. More recently, design-thinking has gained attention in business as a new and improved way to increase the overall speed and impact of innovation initiatives.
  • It’s a thinking style that works through discovery and development in a non-linear way It’s the way the team thinks and works within a project that defines how design-thinking is different than a staged and convergent approach Design-thinking places more importance on modes of thinking such as learning, analyzing, framing, creating and developing
  • Design-thinking is an iterative process involving information gathering, knowledge building, problem framing, opportunity identification and solution creation.
  • Though somewhat idealized, this path exhibits some of the key thinking modes through the innovation space. Design-thinking considers all key business activities in the creation of an attractive business opportunity or solution, as well as how prepared the team is to deliver the solution.
  • Design-thinking is an iterative process involving information gathering, knowledge building, problem framing, opportunity identification and solution creation.
  • Design thinking seeks to uncover the underlying patterns of perception and behavior and build a contextual framework to explain what end users do and why they do it.
  • Design-thinking is an iterative process involving information gathering, knowledge building, problem framing, opportunity identification and solution creation.
  • Design-thinking is an iterative process involving information gathering, knowledge building, problem framing, opportunity identification and solution creation.
  • And it is about understanding needs deeply… it isn’t a faster horse… it is faster, safer, more comfortable, transportation.
  • And it is about understanding needs deeply… it isn’t a faster horse… it is faster, safer, more comfortable, transportation.
  • And it is about understanding needs deeply… it isn’t a faster horse… it is faster, safer, more comfortable, transportation.
  • And it is about understanding needs deeply… it isn’t a faster horse… it is faster, safer, more comfortable, transportation.
  • And it is about understanding needs deeply… it isn’t a faster horse… it is faster, safer, more comfortable, transportation.
  • And it is about understanding needs deeply… it isn’t a faster horse… it is faster, safer, more comfortable, transportation.
  • Though somewhat idealized, this path exhibits some of the key thinking modes through the innovation space. Design-thinking considers all key business activities in the creation of an attractive business opportunity or solution, as well as how prepared the team is to deliver the solution.
  • Design-thinking focuses on making innovation tangible. It is only through the creation and delivery of products, services, experiences, business models and processes, that innovation succeeds.
  • Good design-thinking also considers factors such as the ability of the organization to deliver it.
  • Good design-thinking also considers factors such as the ability of the organization to deliver it.
  • Design-thinking focuses on making innovation tangible. It is only through the creation and delivery of products, services, experiences, business models and processes, that innovation succeeds.
  • Design-thinking focuses on making innovation tangible. It is only through the creation and delivery of products, services, experiences, business models and processes, that innovation succeeds.
  • Good design-thinking also considers factors such as the ability of the organization to deliver it.
  • We believe design-thinking is a powerful way to prepare the conditions for innovation to occur as well as an approach to creating tangible products, services and experiences. We believe design-thinking is more than an improved innovation approach that investigates “contextual problems” or “pain points”. The successful application of design-thinking also considers team experience and skills, thinking styles, and the organization of work processes that can enable new ways of seeing, thinking and working to have a real stake in the innovation process.
  • We believe design-thinking is a powerful way to prepare the conditions for innovation to occur as well as an approach to creating tangible products, services and experiences. We believe design-thinking is more than an improved innovation approach that investigates “contextual problems” or “pain points”. The successful application of design-thinking also considers team experience and skills, thinking styles, and the organization of work processes that can enable new ways of seeing, thinking and working to have a real stake in the innovation process.
  • We believe design-thinking is a powerful way to prepare the conditions for innovation to occur as well as an approach to creating tangible products, services and experiences. We believe design-thinking is more than an improved innovation approach that investigates “contextual problems” or “pain points”. The successful application of design-thinking also considers team experience and skills, thinking styles, and the organization of work processes that can enable new ways of seeing, thinking and working to have a real stake in the innovation process.

Design driven innovation 1182010 (pp-tshare) Design driven innovation 1182010 (pp-tshare) Presentation Transcript

  • Thinking About Change
  • Fresh thinking that creates real value for someone and has a positive impact on the organization that delivers it. Innovation n .
  • Transforming insights, data and requirements into tangible products, services and experiences that create real value for a consumer or user and creates a positive impact on the organization that delivers it. The act of “design” involves the people who need something and all the people who can create stuff, not just designers. Design v . View slide
  • “ A purposeful move from a current state to a preferred state" Design Thinking v . - Professor John Heskett at HK Polytechnic University. View slide
  • is evolving and there are many views …………….. Design thinking ?
  • “ Design skills and business skills are converging. To be successful in the future, business people will have to become more like designers …more 'masters of heuristics' than 'managers of algorithms.” Roger Martin, Dean of Rotman School of Business, Author of The Design of Business
  • “… design thinking (or whatever we wind up calling this new field) is being created at the borders of design, business, engineering and even marketing.” Bruce Nussbaum, Business Week
  • “ It is about understanding culture and context before we even start on ideas .” Tim Brown, IDEO
  • “ Part of my job is to move [ a good idea ] around, just see what different people think, get people talking about it, argue with people about it, get ideas moving among that group of 100 people … get different people together to explore different aspects of it …” Steve Jobs, Apple Photo: whatcounts
  • “ So why collaboration now?.... on the one hand, problems, opportunities, and the environments in which they appear are becoming more complex, on the other hand, to survive this explosion of complexity, people cultivate specialties…. The age of complexity confronts the era of specialization.” Michael Schrage, No More Teams! Mastering the Dynamics of Creative Collaboration
  • “ Design mindfulness is a cultural imperative… it’s a habit of highly successful design-driven companies .” Tom Peters, Design
  • More recently, design thinking has gained attention in business as a possible new and improved way to increase the speed and impact of innovation initiatives
  • it’s the domain of creative people Images courtesy of IDEO Creative people, in creative spaces, doing creative things
  • it’s an innovation discipline Doblin’s Innovation Discipline Model 2006 The right mix of process and activities “ to do things differently and do different things”
  • and a mental stance. It’s how a team thinks and works It’s guided with deep understanding It’s driven by modes of thinking It’s enabled with diversity It’s an emergent thinking style It’s success requires commitment, collaboration as well as a willingness to experiment and assume risk
  • Design thinking has many attributes Collaborative Inclusive Holistic Creative Insightful Provocative Iterative Non-linear Fast Innovative Customer-centered Outcome-oriented
  • Design thinking is less about the steps … Process helps make order out of chaos, but design thinking is more dynamic than any step-wise approach Research Insights Frameworks Concepts Opportunities Solutions
  • and more about different modes of thinking abstract concrete to make to know Analysis What does it mean? Immersion What is the landscape? Synthesis What could we/ would we /should we do? Action How should we do it? Adapted from Vijay Kumar on “Innovation Planning” Presented at 2003 HITS Conference
  • abstract concrete to make to know Insights Frameworks Opportunities Prototypes Solutions Research Adapted from Vijay Kumar on “Innovation Planning” Presented at 2003 HITS Conference and the places where they are needed. Concepts Ideas
  • some call it 360 ° Thinking
  • abstract concrete Analysis What does it mean? Immersion What is the landscape? to know Adapted from Vijay Kumar on “Innovation Planning” Presented at 2003 HITS Conference it strives to understand the current situation
  • This image of a simple chalk message scribed on a sidewalk outside an un-employment office inspires me to think of high impact, low cost and environmentally friendly ways to bring important messages to the people who need it most. and create passion around insight
  • it seeks to find meaning Know, Feel + Dream Do, Use Say, Think Explicit Tacit and Latent Observable Un-conscious Conscious
  • Traditional research approaches are often blunt tools for examining human behavior. Why does a couple go out to dinner and a movie one night … and then eat popcorn and watch a DVD at home the next night? it seeks to uncover actual behavior
  • Person Person Person User Design thinking encourages a positive collaborative discussion … “ End user” focused discussion
  • Person Person Person Opinion! Opinion! Opinion! verses the typical collaborative behavior. “ Opinion focused” conversation
  • When you understand the experience, you can own it When you truly understand the end user experience, then you can own it. Design thinking seeks to create wisdom …
  • abstract concrete to make to know Synthesis What could we/ would we/ should we do? Adapted from Vijay Kumar on “Innovation Planning” Presented at 2003 HITS Conference to frame new problems, create new stories …
  • The process is comprised of two parts; the cycle and the context. The context is the situation that informs the cycle. Users bring an understanding of standards , modes and places to each moment of the cycle. Most will change their choice of places and modes when their standards change. Standards Activities Environments Event Setting Goals Decision Monitoring Evaluation Design thinking visualizes complex information in a way that can inspire new thought to bring complex information to life …
  • abstract concrete to know Action How should we do it? Adapted from Vijay Kumar on “Innovation Planning” Presented at 2003 HITS Conference then drive new solutions. to make
  • Adapted from Vijay Kumar on “Innovation Planning” Presented at 2003 HITS Conference Design thinking is inclusive Providing roles for different personal preferences abstract concrete to make to know “ IMPLEMENTOR” “ IDEATOR” “ DEVELOPER” “ CLARIFIER” “ RESEARCHER”
  • Deep involvement on the part of a team is a key factor in the successful transition of knowledge and insights into concepts and solutions
  • Analysis What does it mean? Immersion What is the landscape? Adapted from Vijay Kumar on “Innovation Planning” Presented at 2003 HITS Conference Synthesis What could we/ would we /should we do? Action How should we do it? It’s a dynamic and emergent process that often seeks opportunity by entering through the end users world to craft and shape, problems, opportunities, strategies, ideas and solutions Design thinking is emergent
  • The team that is involved in the act of creation is more likely to implement it
  • Design thinking … Seeks to bring creativity and informed intuition back into management practice
  • Analytical thinking Intuitive thinking Design thinking “ to create better business leaders” Roger Martin , Dean of Rotman School of Business
  • Design thinking … Seeks to moderate many roles
  • “ If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses ." Henry Ford Photo: Whitby Archives one for the innovator
  • Photo: Whitby Archives “ Why do you want a faster horse?” “ So I can get to the store in less time.” “ Why do you want to get to the store in less time?” “ So I can get more work done at the farm.” “ Why do you want to get more work done on the farm?” “ So I can have more time to spend with… and one for the end user If someone had explored the end user there may have been many opportunities to see
  • Photo: whatcounts one for technology
  • Photo: Alaska-in-Pictures.com and one for human desire
  • one for business and one for society
  • one for us and one for our future. Photo: China-pix
  • Design thinking … Questions orthodoxies What is tangible? What is intangible? What is the “product”?
  • “ The bottle is just the visible tip of a much deeper system of drug delivery .” Brandon Schauer, Adaptive Path
  • Design thinking creates new and unexpected ways to solve problems…. “ A home owner and avid do-it-yourselfer was observed trying to use both hands to do a repair task. He stuck the flashlight under his collar to free up his hands.” This observation inspired the Black & Decker design team to think about the idea of wearing a flashlight.
  • Design thinking works with many principles visualize to collaborate build to think prototype to learn “ Prototypes are the essential medium for information, interaction, integration, and collaboration .” Michael Schrage
  • Design thinking embraces many prototyping “technologies” Prototyping utilizes story telling, improvisation, sketches, models, illustrations, storyboarding, videos, environments, and animations. They all have a role in conveying the intent, the potential, and the emotional experience of an idea . Image courtesy of Second City Innovation Image courtesy of Kevin Miller and Innovation Focus
  • The faster you put your ideas into the world the faster you learn about their strengths and weaknesses Why be prototype-driven ?
  • Prototyping facilitates learning Person Person Person Prototype A prototype encourages collaboration
  • Adapted from Vijay Kumar on “Innovation Planning” Presented at 2003 HITS Conference Design thinking connects NPD activities
  • Sources: Adapted from models created by Doblin & Eames Innovation can be found at the intersection of an evolving need and a technology User + Society Should we ? Technology Could we?
  • Embracing design thinking will help identify and create an attractive opportunity, but it is the organization’s ability to deliver that ensures innovation will get implemented.
  • Sources: Adapted from models created by Doblin & Eames User + Society Should we ? Capability Could we? innovation is moderated by the ability of the organization to deliver it. Would we? Organization
  • The biggest obstacle to change is not your competition, it’s the way you currently do things.
  • Vision + Mission Leadership Communication Behavior Willingness Competencies Work processes Legacy systems Barriers or drivers of change?
  • One often over-looked success factor is the even distribution of commitment around innovation among all stakeholders in an organization
  • “ Is your entire organization really on board? When you make breakfast, do you know what the difference is between the chicken and the pig?” Watts Wacker ‘ The 500 Year Delta: What Happens After What Comes Next ’
  • Everyone has a role in change. They all need to have “skin in the game”. level challenge Line workers Project Management Middle Management Senior Management
  • Design thinking creates change. Created an entirely new “hands-free” lighting category Transformed Black & Decker from marginal player to the category leader in lighting Highest profitability return in history of the Black & Decker houseware’s business The most successful new product launch in Black & Decker’s History Garnered a dozen industry honors. Permanent collection of the Cooper-Hewitt IDEO selected the SnakeLight as one of 25 items from the Cooper-Hewitt permanent collection that best represents “Design-Thinking”
  • In times of rapid and profound change we need new choices because existing systems are rapidly becoming obsolete. Why change?
  • The data-driven revolution has made business more reliable, but it has also driven courage and intuition out of management. Why design thinking now?
  • How can design thinking help business? Design thinking can help prepare the conditions for innovation to occur and help enable innovation to make it to market.
  • How can design thinking help create change? “ We can’t solve our problems with the same thinking that we used when we created them.” - Albert Einstein
  • Where does design thinking apply? “ Where are the boundaries to problems?” - Charles Eames
  • "It is really a challenge of translating frames of reference between a designer's understanding of a problem and opportunity and a business person's understanding of the same problem and opportunity.” What is the challenge? - Tom Hirsch/ InSearch
  • IMHO Design thinking is a dialogue that needs to be painted across a broad canvas within an organization. In other words, design thinking is an innovation practice that can be understood and embraced by everyone involved in helping to prepare the conditions for innovation to happen as well as in helping to bring innovation to market. It’s more than big ideas, successfully driving innovation with design thinking needs to acknowledge that there are many factors within the organization that can affect the ability to deliver innovation.
  • Bibliography I have tried to incorporate the best thinking and practices that have been developed over the years by practitioners and academics associated with product development management, creative problem solving, and design research and planning. I would like to give special credit to the following sources for this presentation: The Doblin Group IDEO Vijay Kumar , Associate Professor | Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology. Matt Benson Founder of PD3 and an Innovation Focus faculty partner Innovation Focus Inc . The Second City Innovation an innovation partner of Innovation Focus Inc.