Risks in Executive Coaching and how to minimize them
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Risks in Executive Coaching and how to minimize them Risks in Executive Coaching and how to minimize them Presentation Transcript

  • Risks in Executive Coaching and How to Minimize Them Ben Dattner, Ph.D.
  • Executive Coaching: Risks and how to minimize them • Client selection • Coach selection • Client/coach matching • Alignment • Confidentiality • Role confusion • Accountability • Follow up 2 © 2010 Dattner Consulting, LLC www.dattnerconsulting.com
  •  Client selection Executive Coaching: Client selection risks • Coach selection • Client/coach matching • Alignment • Confidentiality Providing coaching to the wrong person at the wrong time • Coach role confusion • Accountability for the wrong reason can be a waste of the organization’s • Follow up focus and resources and can even be a harmful distraction. - It’s possible that coaching is not the right intervention and/or that the designated client is not the right recipient - Beware investing in coaching for an individual if there are other issues that need to be addressed first: - Technical, skill or knowledge gaps - Lack of clarity about role definition or expectations - Team, departmental or organizational dysfunction - Personal challenges - Coaching should be used for high performing and/or high potential clients, and not be used as a remedial exercise 3 © 2010 Dattner Consulting, LLC www.dattnerconsulting.com
  • • Client selection Executive Coaching: Coach selection risks  Coach selection • Client/coach matching • Alignment • Confidentiality Coaching is still an unregulated and fragmented industry. • Coach role confusion The wrong coaches can do more harm then good by influencing • Accountability • Follow up clients in counter-productive ways and making dysfunctional organizational politics worse. Coaches should be thoroughly screened for: - Appropriate educational and training credentials - Relevant business or client experience and knowledge - Reference checks at similar organizations or for relevant client situations - Internet searches for coach publications, website, affiliations and professional networks 4 © 2010 Dattner Consulting, LLC www.dattnerconsulting.com
  • • Client selection Executive Coaching: Client/coach matching risks • Coach selection  Client/coach matching • Alignment • Confidentiality • Coach role confusion There needs to be good chemistry between client and coach. • Accountability If a client is matched with the wrong coach, the engagement • Follow up is much less likely to be successful and may end prematurely. Recommendations: - Create a database of coaches that includes matching criteria for the first cut - Give clients a choice of coach, and arrange several in-person informational meetings with potential coaches to inform client’s final selection 5 © 2010 Dattner Consulting, LLC www.dattnerconsulting.com
  • • Client selection Executive Coaching: Alignment risks • Coach selection • Client/coach matching  Alignment • Confidentiality • Coach role confusion There are four participants in most coaching engagements: • Accountability coach, client, manager, and HR. If there is misalignment of • Follow up goals and expectations at the front end of the coaching that are not addressed, the engagement is not likely to succeed. What needs to be aligned: - Goals for the engagement from the perspectives of the manager, HR and client - Agreement about timing and duration of the coaching - Expectations and commitments about confidentiality 6 © 2010 Dattner Consulting, LLC www.dattnerconsulting.com
  • • Client selection Executive Coaching: Confidentiality risks • Coach selection • Client/coach matching • Alignment  Confidentiality There needs to be a balance between confidentiality and • Coach role confusion sharing of information. Too little confidentiality and the client • Accountability and feedback providers won’t trust in the process. Too much • Follow up confidentiality and it’s hard to hold the client accountable for progress. What should be confidential: - Feedback from assessments - 360 degree feedback surveys - Interview findings What should be shared: - A summary of key themes - The development plan based 7 © 2010 Dattner Consulting, LLC www.dattnerconsulting.com
  • • Client selection Executive Coaching: Coach role confusion risks • Coach selection • Client/coach matching • Alignment • Confidentiality  Coach role confusion There is often a temptation for coaches to overstep the • Accountability boundaries of their role for a variety of reasons. Coaches • Follow up should not play these roles: Evaluator: Compromises trust in the process and discourages client from being fully open Messenger: Conveying messages back and forth is the role of a mediator, not a coach Advocate: Coaches should not get involved in organizational politics or make arguments on behalf of clients For an article on this topic: http://www.dattnerconsulting.com/threeroles 8 © 2010 Dattner Consulting, LLC www.dattnerconsulting.com
  • • Client selection Executive Coaching: Accountability risks • Coach selection • Client/coach matching • Alignment In too many coaching engagements, the client is not held • Confidentiality • Coach role confusion appropriately accountable for learning from, and acting on, the  Accountability feedback and insights gained in the coaching. For coaching to • Follow up be most successful, all four participants should be accountable: Client: For the extent to which the development plan has been successfully implemented Coach: For the value he or she added to the client and the organization in achieving the agreed-upon coaching goals Manager: For supporting the client in putting insights into action HR: For evaluating coaches and applying coaching process best practices across the organization 9 © 2010 Dattner Consulting, LLC www.dattnerconsulting.com
  • • Client selection Executive Coaching: Follow up risks • Coach selection • Client/coach matching • Alignment • Confidentiality In too many coaching engagements, there is little to no follow up • Coach role confusion and the short term benefits of coaching are not fully realized over • Accountability  Follow up the longer term. Recommendations: - Build in follow up meetings to support progress - If 360 feedback was part of the coaching, resurvey and benchmark progress after 6 months or a year - Evaluate coach performance by surveying client, supervisor and HR - Apply lessons from each coaching engagement to subsequent ones 10 © 2010 Dattner Consulting, LLC www.dattnerconsulting.com
  • Ben Dattner, Ph.D. Dattner Consulting, LLC 1-212-501-8945 ben@dattnerconsulting.com www.dattnerconsulting.com 11