Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Caregivers' Functional Literacy of their Children's Medication use
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Caregivers' Functional Literacy of their Children's Medication use

  • 92 views
Published

This presentation was delivered in session B2 of Quality Forum 2014 by: …

This presentation was delivered in session B2 of Quality Forum 2014 by:

Ran Goldman
Professor, Department of Pediatrics
UBC

Published in Health & Medicine
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
92
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Multicentre Study of Caregivers’ Literacy Regarding Their Child’s Medication Use Christine H. Smith MBBS Natalie Phillips MBBS Alan L. Nager MD MHA Daniel M. Cohen MD Ran D. Goldman MD
  • 2. Pretx.org
  • 3. Medications • 75% of medications used by children were never tested in children • The dose used is derived frequently from adult studies
  • 4. When it Really Matters • Millions of families bring their children to the emergency department every year. – Primary provider is unavailable – Late at night – Perceiving emergency situation
  • 5. In Emergency • • • • Lack of previous records Busy setting Primary providers unavailable No time to search external records
  • 6. Pharmanet modernization. Quality Forum 2013
  • 7. Pharmanet modernization. Quality Forum 2013
  • 8. Objective To assess the ability of parents and caregivers to recall and communicate information regarding their children’s medication usage in a pediatric Emergency Department (ED) population.
  • 9. Methods • • • • • 4 emergency departments Interview with parents Children 0-18 years Structured 15-question survey During the 7 days prior to their visit
  • 10. Results • • • • 1563 caregivers were approached 1433 (92%) interviews completed Primary care provider in 1376 (96%) 1 or more meds by 965 (67%) children
  • 11. 1564 Approached 1433 (92%) Completed 468 (33%) Using no Prescribed or OTC Meds 468 (67%) Using Prescribed or OTC Meds
  • 12. Medical Problems
  • 13. Number of Medications
  • 14. Results • Meaningful name in 1669 (82%) medications • Name and dose for 987 (49%) medications
  • 15. Meaningful Name
  • 16. Meaningful Name and Dose
  • 17. Side Effects Known
  • 18. MEDICATION TYPES OTC MEDICATIONS 1089 (54%) LANGUAGE AT HOME PRESCRIBED MEDICATIONS 926 (46%) NOT ENGLISH 328 (16%) ENGLISH 1695 (84%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 826 (76%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 838 (91%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 1424 (84%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 245 (75%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 426 (39%)) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE (563 (60%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 820 (48%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 167 (51%)
  • 19. MEDICATION TYPES OTC MEDICATIONS 1089 (54%) LANGUAGE AT HOME PRESCRIBED MEDICATIONS 926 (46%) NOT ENGLISH 328 (16%) ENGLISH 1695 (84%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 826 (76%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 838 (91%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 1424 (84%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 245 (75%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 426 (39%)) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE (563 (60%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 820 (48%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 167 (51%) P < 0.001
  • 20. MEDICATION TYPES OTC MEDICATIONS 1089 (54%) LANGUAGE AT HOME PRESCRIBED MEDICATIONS 926 (46%) ENGLISH 1695 (84%) NOT ENGLISH 328 (16%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 826 (76%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 838 (91%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 1424 (84%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 245 (75%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 426 (39%)) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE (563 (60%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 820 (48%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 167 (51%)
  • 21. MEDICATION TYPES OTC MEDICATIONS 1089 (54%) LANGUAGE AT HOME PRESCRIBED MEDICATIONS 926 (46%) ENGLISH 1695 (84%) NOT ENGLISH 328 (16%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 826 (76%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 838 (91%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 1424 (84%) • MEANINGFUL NAME 245 (75%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 426 (39%)) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE (563 (60%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 820 (48%) • MEANINGFUL NAME AND DOSE 167 (51%) P < 0.001
  • 22. Conclusions Caregivers provided limited information regarding their child’s medication dose Especially : - English as a second language - Patients using OTC medications
  • 23. Conclusions We suggest : – Develop strategies to optimise medication literacy – Provide medication lists to your patients – Advocate bringing meds to health care providers