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Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy
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Quality HVAC Installation Made Easy

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To save energy seal ducts. New code requirements will test ducts for air leakage. Find out the best way to seal your HVAC system whether it's a retrofit or a new system. …

To save energy seal ducts. New code requirements will test ducts for air leakage. Find out the best way to seal your HVAC system whether it's a retrofit or a new system.

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  • No Trade offs allowed for duct insulation.
    Exception: - ducts completely inside the building envelope
    Building framing cavities shall not be used as supply ducts.
  • Equipment sizing is a direct reference to the IRC.
    Oversized equipment has a higher initial cost, a higher operating cost, provides less comfort, and the short-cycling reduces the equipment life expectancy. Any one of these is a good reason not to oversize.
    Heating and cooling system design loads for the purpose of sizing systems and equipment shall be determined in accordance with the procedures described in the ACCA Manual J or an equivalent computation procedure.
  • Equipment sizing is a direct reference to the IRC.
    Oversized equipment has a higher initial cost, a higher operating cost, provides less comfort, and the short-cycling reduces the equipment life expectancy. Any one of these is a good reason not to oversize.
    Heating and cooling system design loads for the purpose of sizing systems and equipment shall be determined in accordance with the procedures described in the ACCA Manual J or an equivalent computation procedure.
  • • Supports a wide variety of existing financial products
    including, but not limited to:
    – Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE)
    – Fannie Mae loans
    – Non-collateral loans
    – Secured loan products
    – On-bill financing • Supports a wide variety of existing financial products
    including, but not limited to:
    – Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE)
    – Fannie Mae loans
    – Non-collateral loans
    – Secured loan products
    – On-bill financing
  • Transcript

    • 1. Quality HVAC System Installation The goal for a Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system is to provide proper air flow, heating, and cooling to each room
    • 2. Class Sponsors Nevada Housing Division Nevada State Office of Energy
    • 3. Instructor Barbara Collins Energy Rated Homes  Building Science Consultant  Certified Green Building Verifier  Certified HERS Rater  Energy Star Homes Partner
    • 4. Class Objectives  Understand IECC Duct Sealing and Testing Requirements  Learn How to Meet IECC and Energy Star Homes Requirements  Learn How to Avoid Common Installation Problems  Learn About IECC Requirement for Manual J Load Calculation  Learn About Proposed Retrofit Programs and Rebates For Growing Your Business
    • 5. HVAC System  Poor design and installation increases energy costs 10 –30%  Sizing  Design  Installation
    • 6. Ducts - IECC  Insulation (Prescriptive)  Ducts outside the building envelope: R-8  All other ducts: R-6  Sealing (Mandatory)  Joints and seams shall comply with IRC, Section M1601.4.1  Building framing cavities shall not be used as supply ducts
    • 7. Duct Tightness Tests  All ducts, air handlers, filter boxes and building cavities used as ducts shall be sealed (Section 403.2.2)  Duct tightness shall be verified by testing  Only Exception: Duct tightness test is not required if the air handler and all ducts are located within conditioned space Mandatory Requirements
    • 8. Current Code Requirements  Must comply with all aspects of UL181 standards  Fittings, joints & seams of duct system shall be made substantially air tight by means of tapes, mastics, gasketing or other means.
    • 9. SEAL DUCTS, SAVE ENERGY Sealing ducts is a cost-effective energy efficiency practice that gives a high return on investment
    • 10. Home Energy Use  Residential energy use 22% of U.S. total  25% of carbon emissions in U.S.  Heating & cooling is 40 – 60 % of home energy use
    • 11. Why seal ducts  Leaks waste energy and money  Average system leakage  New construction 20%  Existing homes 30%  Duct sealing reduces heating and cooling energy losses and saves money
    • 12. Other Problems  Duct leakage reduces air flow, conditioned air isn’t delivered to rooms which can cause wide temperature swings between rooms  IAQ issues with return leaks drawing in air from attics, garages, crawlspaces  Pressure differentials can cause excess building air leakage and backdrafting
    • 13. Duct Tightness Tests  Post construction tests  Option 1  Leakage to outdoors: ≤8 cfm/per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area  OR  Option 2  Total leakage: ≤12 cfm/per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area Mandatory Requirements
    • 14. Duct Tightness Tests Rough-in test Options  Option 1  Total leakage ≤6 cfm/per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area OR  Option 2 If air handler not installed at time of test total air leakage ≤4 cfm/per 100 ft2 Mandatory Requirements
    • 15. Exceptions: Duct tightness test is not required if the air handler and all ducts are located within conditioned space
    • 16. Ventilation Outdoor air intakes and exhausts shall have automatic or gravity dampers that close when the ventilation system is not operating Mandatory Requirements
    • 17. Tested at a pressure differential of 0.1 in w.g. (25Pa) across entire system, including manufacturer’s air handler enclosure
    • 18. Mastic Sealant Non-toxic – Low VOC Green credits Dries to touch in about ½ hour Recommended Set time = 20 hours
    • 19. More on Mastic  High strength adhesive compound  Usually applied by trowel, brush, caulking gun or hand  3 types- water-based; solvent-based; and two-component curing systems  Water-based is the safest and easiest to use It performs as well and in some cases better than the other 2
    • 20. VOCs in mastics  Volatile organic compounds  In water-based mastics, the only volatile compound is water which is inorganic  VOCs are infinitesimally small (not recordable)  Water-based mastics pose a low health risk compared to solvent-based and two- component mastics  Safer for the user, better IAQ, greener
    • 21. How to apply mastic  Step 1 - Clean Duct Surface  Wipe dust oil and grease from the duct surface  Step 2 - Apply the mastic  Gaps less than 1/4″, load brush with mastic and coat entire joint with a continuous strip  Use brush end to work mastic into joint  Spread mastic at least one inch on each side of the joint.  The mastic should be thick enough to hide the metal surface of the duct.
    • 22. Mesh for Gaps  If gap is larger than 1/4 inch use fiberglass mesh too  If mesh is sticky on one side, cut enough to cover joint, press in place, then completely cover it with mastic.  If mesh does not have a sticky side, apply a thin layer of mastic, press mesh into the mastic, then apply a finish layer of mastic.
    • 23. Tools & Materials Head lamp, hat with light, or flashlight A work board to span joists in attics Gallon pail and 2-3 caulk tubes of mastic Caulk Gun, mastic brush, fin and plenum brush Roll of mesh 2-3 pairs of latex gloves 2-3 cloths, can of coil and fin cleaner to wipe joints clean before applying mastic and clean up Utility knife and telescoping mirror Pliers, screw driver and tin snips For Sealing Existing Systems
    • 24. Sealing Priorities 1. Disconnected components 2. Connections between the air handling unit and the plenums 3. All seams in the air handling units and plenums, takeoffs, boots, and other connections, especially site-built items.
    • 25.  Remove tie holding duct to connection  Roll back insulation and outer cover  Seal inner core with mastic and band  Roll insulation down and vapor barrier/outer cover  Put band and seal with mastic
    • 26.  Wrap Ducts with insulation  Insulation may be installed over wet mastic but do not move the ducts too much or mastic seal could be damaged.  All duct support work should be done before applying mastic  Wait 2 -4 hours and water based mastic will be dry to the touch
    • 27. AIRTIGHT DUCT SYSTEM Boots and Cans  Seal seams with mastic Thin mastic will crack Make seal permanent Plug Don’t Paint Thick as a Nickel = .077 in 1/16 inch = .0625 in
    • 28. AIRTIGHT DUCT SYSTEM Flexible Ducts Seal inner sleeve & outer sleeve  Plastic strap holds the inner liner firmly to the duct or fitting.  Mastic seals liner to connection and covers the end of the liner  Use drawband to hold outer sleeve (vapor barrier) Vapor barrier should be complete. All holes, rips, and seams must be sealed with mastic or approved tape
    • 29. AIRTIGHT DUCT SYSTEM Metal Ducts and Plenums, Duct Board Boxes  Openings greater than 1/4 inch should be sealed with mastic and mesh  Openings less than 1/4 inch should be sealed with mastic  Special attention to collar connections to duct-board and/or sheet metal; seal around the connection with mastic
    • 30. Ts Ys & Ls  Use mesh tape to strengthen the joint where ducts of different shapes meet.  Seal all seams, even manufactured ones.
    • 31. Sealant applied, still leaks
    • 32. FABRICATION & INSTALLATION GUIDELINES  The air handler box should be air-tight
    • 33. Air Handler Leaks
    • 34. Mechanical Systems & Equipment
    • 35. AHUs & Plenums  Fill all openings for wiring, plumbing and refrigerant lines.  Seal all seams in the air handler and plenums.  Tape around access panels, so they can be opened for service.
    • 36. AIRTIGHT HVAC SYSTEM Air handlers on platforms  May be located in a closet indoors  Framers must be told not to put plywood top on before walls are sheetrocked (or duct board) to underside of platform floor  All wall surfaces must be sheetrocked next to and in platform  Seal all joints
    • 37. Boots  Seal all joints, including manufactured seams.  The transition between the duct and boot may require mesh tape.
    • 38. AIRTIGHT DUCT SYSTEM All Duct Types Register boxes should be sealed to the drywall or floor with caulking or mastic
    • 39. AIRTIGHT DUCT SYSTEM All Duct Types Register boxes should be sealed to the drywall or floor with caulking or mastic
    • 40. SHEET MEATAL CONNECTIONS  Start the inner fitting into the outer fitting  Apply a 2” wide band of mastic 20 – 30 mils thick to the exposed part of the inner fitting  Fully seat the joint and mechanically fasten with sheet metal screws or rivets  Apply a 2.5” wide band of mastic 20 – 30 mils thick to the outside of the joint covering the screws or rivets and joint gap  Allow at least 12 hours drying time before starting system  Temperature and humidity conditions can vary, longer dry times may be required
    • 41. Locating ducts within conditioned space  Within conditioned space means within insulated space and within the air barrier boundary.  Attics and crawlspaces are not conditioned space  Critical that space is truly indoors and sealed from unconditioned areas  Multi-level dwellings more easily accommodate ducts in conditioned space
    • 42. Ducts in Unconditioned Space  Usually ducts are located in attics and crawlspaces  Conduction losses are amplified by big temperature differences  Convection losses by leakage Long duct runs in attics lose 15%+ of cooling capacity before end
    • 43. Benefits of locating ducts in conditioned space  Ducts can be smaller  May have shorter runs reduce pressure drop and improve efficiency  Can reduce HVAC system costs by reducing loads  Reduce conduction losses  Improve comfort  No Testing in 09 IECC
    • 44. EXISTING HOMES  In existing homes, not unusual to find disconnected duct components, takeoffs loose from ducts or ducts disconnected from register boots
    • 45. EXISTING HOMES  Leaks connected to the outdoors are more important than leaks inside home’s thermal envelope  Holes near the air handler are more important than distant holes with relatively low pressures  Supply system leaks waste more energy than return system leaks  Furnaces
    • 46. Equipment Sizing  Load calculations determine the proper capacity (size) of equipment  Goal is big enough to ensure comfort but no bigger  Calculations with ACCA Manual J protocol or other approved methods Mandatory Requirements
    • 47. Oversizing What do you get when you combine cognitive bias with inaccurate information?
    • 48. Oversizing  Old Rules of Thumb  One Size Fits All  US Department of Energy  Most systems are oversized, increasing installation cost for every house
    • 49. Oversizing  Sizing example House with standard metal windows w/ .75 U- Value and .88 SHGC and 20% duct leakage  Calculated Sensible cooling load = 58880 Btu
    • 50. Oversizing  Sizing example  Same house with Low-E windows and tight duct system @ 5% leakage  Sensible cooling load = 43877 Btu  Average of 1-2” decrease in duct diameter sizes
    • 51. Oversizing  Installation cost is higher  Operating cost over life of equipment is higher  Can cause comfort problems  Improvements in building envelope should reduce loads
    • 52. Right Sizing  Costs less to install – saves builder money  Costs less to operate - not starting and stopping all the time  Short cycling can cause bigger swings in supply air, less comfort  Better humidity control
    • 53. DESIGN HVAC SYSTEM Loads and CFM Calculation  ACCA Manual J Load Calculation or equivalent required  Calculate heat loss and heat gain for each room Total room loads to determine system requirements.
    • 54. Manual J –Load Calc  The local climate – ASHRAE 30 year average  Size, shape, and orientation of the house  Insulation levels  Window area, location, and type  Air infiltration rates  Number of occupants  Types and efficiencies of lights and major home appliances (which give off heat)  ACCA - Air Conditioning Contractors of America www.acca.org
    • 55. A Quality HVAC System  Be properly sized to provide correct air flow, and meet room-by-room calculated heating and cooling loads.  Have sealed ductwork that will provide proper air flow.  Be installed with a return system designed to provide correct return air flow.  Have balanced air flows between supply and return systems to maintain neutral pressure in the home.  Be properly charged with refrigerant
    • 56. “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.” - Yogi Berra
    • 57. U.S. Dept of Energy 30/30 Vision 2012 IECC 30% More Stringent 2006 IECC More verification testing
    • 58. Ductwork  Single most important energy measure for most homes- low hanging fruit  Locating inside conditioned space is optimal  Seal joints with mastic not duct tape
    • 59. Equipment Size  Oversizing is common and expensive – upfront and during life  Sizing properly can reduce cost and help pay for increased cost of other efficiency features
    • 60. HOME STAR Program  $6 Billion Residential Retrofit  SILVER STAR – $3.6 Billion  GOLD STAR - $1.8 Billion  Financing / QA / Admin – $600 Million
    • 61. Recovery Through Retrofit  Construction 24.7% unemployment in construction industry 38% drop in employment since 2006  Manufacturing 24.5 % drop in construction related manufacturing Construction-related manufacturing at less than 62% of capacity  Construction Retail 14% drop in employment since 2006
    • 62. SILVER STAR  Up to a $1,500 rebate per measure  Not to exceed $3,000  Not to exceed 50% of project cost  Rebate delivered to customer at time of purchase, but paid to installer  All retrofits must be installed by a certified contractor
    • 63. SILVER STAR  Eligible Measures  Air Sealing Duct Seal / Replacement  Heating & Cooling Equipment  Attic Insulation  Wall Insulation  Domestic Hot Water  Floor Insulation  Windows and Doors
    • 64.  $3,000 incentive for a 20% savings based on assessment by building performance professional  • $1,000 for each additional 5% savings  • Not to exceed 50% of project cost or $8,000
    • 65. HOME STAR Financing  Creates up to $1.5 Billion in low interest consumer financing  Allows American families to achieve cash flow positive results on most HOME STAR projects from day one
    • 66. Learn from the mistakes of others. You can't possibly live long enough to make them all yourself --Sam Levinson
    • 67. Thank you for participating  Any questions  Please complete your evaluation sheets so we can plan future events

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