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Gulf States Hort Expo 2012: Today's Consumer
 

Gulf States Hort Expo 2012: Today's Consumer

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Recent consumer research about today's gardening consumer. Presented by Bill Calkins at Gulf States Hort Expo 2012 in Mobile, AL - 1/18/2012

Recent consumer research about today's gardening consumer. Presented by Bill Calkins at Gulf States Hort Expo 2012 in Mobile, AL - 1/18/2012

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    Gulf States Hort Expo 2012: Today's Consumer Gulf States Hort Expo 2012: Today's Consumer Presentation Transcript

    • Gulf States Horticultural Expo 2012: Marketing to Today’s Consumer
    • The Top 10
      • Our top ten findings from Ball’s 2008-2010 research….
        • Focus Groups
        • Internet Survey
        • Store observations
      • Mixed in with a few extra ingredients…
    • 10.
      • Once a gardener, always a gardener!
        • Decline isn’t from existing gardeners leaving or doing less…..
    • Gardening groups, by age
    • Gardener Type – By Age Q9. Which of the following best describes your gardening activities?
    • Time Invested in Gardening Q11. Over the last few years, would you say that your time invested in gardening has…? Q12. Why has the time you have invested in gardening [increased/decreased]?
      • Why has the time invested in gardening increased? (n=277)
      • Garden expanding (36%)
      • More time (24%)
      • More space (22%)
      • Enjoy gardening / More interest (11%)
      • Plants need more maintenance (7%)
      • Improves value of home (4%)
      • Why has the time invested in gardening decreased? (n=99)
      • Less time (37%)
      • Physical limitations (30%)
      • Less space (11%)
      • Fewer plants (10%)
      • Move to condo (5%)
      • Weather/Climate (5%)
      • Cost of gardening (4%)
    • Ageless Society
      • Disintegrating hierarchy
      • “ How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you were?” (Satchel Paige)
      • Technology is the catalyst that blends generations
      • What baby boomer?
    • The non-gardeners Q1b. Have you ever done any flower gardening as an adult?
    • Reasons for not gardening Q1c. What is the main reason you did not flower garden this past season? Q1d. What are the other reasons you did not garden this past season?
    • 9.
      • Consumers’ views on gardening and the environment are, well, buried.
        • Gardening perceived as ‘good’
        • Not like planting a tree…
        • … and not like turf….
    • Eco? The endorser, but not the driver. Q7a. Below are some statements related to the reasons you garden and your gardening habits. Please rate your agreement with the statements using a scale of 1 to 7, where 7 means ‘totally agree’ and 1 means ‘totally disagree’.
    • Eco-lution
      • Carrying the burden of responsibility
      • Marriage of environmentally friendly with economically viable
      • Branded green
      • Personal Sustainability Program
      • Ecolution is a revolution!
    •  
    • Localize!
      • Self sufficiency is my independence
      • Knowledge-driven choices
      • Distance-driven choices
      • Quality trumps quantity
    • 8.
      • It’s still not about the price!
        • ‘ A standard impatien in a 4” pot costs about $2.00….what would you pay for a ….?’
    • Least Important Characteristic in Purchasing Decision Q32b. Which characteristic is least important in your decision to purchase?
    • 7.
      • In today’s society, convenience is king
        • But ‘healthy plants’ is table stakes to get in the game
    • Stores Purchased Flowers Q17. What stores did you purchase flowers from in the past year? Q18. Which of these stores would you consider your primary store for flower purchases? Other / Local hardware (4%) Other discount (3%) 55% 50% 45% 43% 17% 15% 37% 21% 18% 16% 1% 6% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Local Nursery Home Depot Lowe's Wal-Mart Grocery Store Other Percent of Gardeners Primary store Shopped for flowers
    • Propensity to ‘shop around’… other stores visited Numbers exceed 100% if more than one secondary outlet chosen.
    • Reasons For Store Selection By Primary Store Q19/20. Reasons you shop at your primary store?
    • Reasons Would Leave/Shop Somewhere Else for Plants Q21. What reason would most likely make you leave a store and shop somewhere else for flowering plants. Q21/22. Reasons you might leave a store and shop somewhere else for flowering plants. Younger gardeners (<45 yrs) are more likely to say this
    • How Much Spent on Flowers in Past Year - By Primary store Q14. In the last 12 months, about how much have you spent in flowers purchased that come in flats or pots for the garden, your patio, etc.? The most amount is also spent by the more experienced gardener, but not the ‘master gardener’.
    • 6.
      • Gardening for ‘function’ ultimately becomes gardening for ‘fun’
        • It’s a process.
      • THEN
      • Gardening main hobby
      • Pride in ‘show’
      • Knowledgeable
      • Shared with family
      • All ages
      • Garden for fun
      • Garden to ‘look at’
      • NOW
      • Low-priority hobby
      • Pride in ‘curb appeal’
      • Unfamiliar; insecure
      • Solo event – stress relief
      • Pre- and post- kid HH’s
      • Garden for function
      • Garden to ‘live in’
    • Primary Reason Garden Q7b. Which statement best reflects your primary reason for gardening? “ Zero” for home value!
    • 5.
      • There are ‘basics’ and then there is everything else.
        • Basics = easy, risk-free, familiar
        • But not pride.
    •  
    • 4.
      • Plants could be easier if they didn’t suffer from my neglect.
        • I don’t mind the work, it’s the commitment that scares me!
    • Flower Purchases Q16. What types of flowers have you purchased within the last year?
    • Change in Gardening Habits/Trends Q26. Below are statements regarding gardening habits and how they have changed over time. Mark whether you agree or disagree.
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • 3.
      • New home owners feel an obligation
        • Permission marketing!
    • My first home… Q13. Which of the following is the primary reason you began flower gardening as an adult?
    • Emotional Connectivity
      • Technically connected yet personally isolated
      • “ Tech me you love me”
      • The need for emotional connectivity
      • A culture of emotions
      • A need for expression – a craving for personal touch
    • Primary Reason Garden Q7b. Which statement best reflects your primary reason for gardening?
    • 2.
      • A key point of entry – vegetables!
        • The stars are aligned!
    •  
    • 1.
      • Decisions are informed and the information comes at Point of Sale.
        • Just the facts, please.
    • Where Look for Gardening Ideas/Inspiration Q25. Where do you look for gardening ideas or inspiration? Significantly more important for the less experienced gardener
    • I won’t buy it if….
      • It looks unhealthy
      • No price
      • No name
      • No sun/shade indicator
    • No price, no sales. Rain or shine.
    • When in doubt….
    •  
    •  
    • Sun vs. shade above all else Q24a. Which information is most important to provide on a flowering plant’s label?
    • What’s wrong with this picture?
    • Great Expectations
      • Convenience oriented to the extreme…
        • We want what we want when we want it!
      • Get it and forget it
      • Savvitivity – more educated and trend savvy
      • A product just for me!
    • Summary….
      • 10. Once a gardener, always a gardener
      • 9. It’s still not about the price
      • 8. The feel-good of gardening
      • 7. Convenience is king.
      • 6. Help your customer go from function to fun
      • 5. There are basics, but then there is pride.
      • 4. It’s not the work, it’s the commitment.
      • 3. New home owners are asking for it!
      • 2. Vegetable-rush
      • 1. It has to come together at Point of Sale!
    • Gulf States Horticultural Expo 2012: How to Market Edibles
    • Methodology
      • Two step study. Qualitative focus groups followed by quantitative internet research.
      • Qualitative: 6 focus groups were conducted, geographically spread – Southeast, Midwest and Northwest. Groups were 2 hours, and were conducted April 5, 6 and 19, 2010.
      • Quantitative: Online facilitated through national consumer panel. 250 total responses.
      • In both studies, consumers met the following recruiting requirements:
        • Purchased minimum of $40 in perennial plants in past year
        • Not a ‘master’ gardener
        • Mix of male and female gardeners
        • Traditional demographic distribution
        • Traditional marketing research screens
    • 10. First is function.
      • Perennials are viewed as the building blocks or enduring structure of the garden, providing lasting definition. The role of annuals is to provide a burst of instant color.
      PERENNIALS ANNUALS
    • Flowers in Yard: Perennials vs. Annuals
      • Perennials account for nearly two-thirds of the flowers in these respondents’ yards.
      Q19_1. Approximately what percent of your flowers in your yard are annuals and what percent are perennials? Please do not include flowering shrubs in your estimate. Base: Have purchased perennial plants within the last year
    • First is function…
      • While color is the ultimate driver of any flower purchase, perennials offer a wide assortment of shape and texture – which provides unique elements in the garden.
      • FUNCTION DRIVERS (out of 10 on an agreement scale)
        • PROVIDE SPOTS OF COLOR 7.8
        • PROVIDE TEXTURE, SHAPE and SIZES 7.4
        • MORE VARIETY IN MY GARDEN 7.2
        • FILL SPACE 6.6
    • Agreements with Statement: Top Two Box
      • Female gardeners are more likely to say they plant perennials for variety (color, shape).
      Q25. (Top2Box (9-10) Summary) Below are some statements related to perennials. Please select your level of agreement with each statement using the scale below. Base: Have purchased perennial plants within the last year Letters indicate the value is significantly higher than the corresponding value at the 95% confidence level.
    • Agreements with Statement: Top Two Box
      • Female gardeners are more likely to say they plant perennials for variety (color, shape).
      Q25. (Top2Box (9-10) Summary) Below are some statements related to perennials. Please select your level of agreement with each statement using the scale below. Base: Have purchased perennial plants within the last year Letters indicate the value is significantly higher than the corresponding value at the 95% confidence level. Know your audience. If you are selling to the woman – talk about color, shape and texture. If you are selling to the man – talk about ease of use!
    • 9. With more perceived ‘ease of use’
      • Interestingly, perennials are viewed as requiring less labor and maintenance than annuals because of one-time installation, less watering, less weeding if they are mulched, and less dead-heading to keep them blooming.
        • Perennials are more forgiving. They seem to thrive on the care that you provide. However, they can go ‘carefree’ – with the amount of time invested in maintaining them directly correlated to years of experience in the garden.
      First season Next season First season Next season Annuals – amount of work Perennials – amount of work
    • Strengths and Weaknesses of Perennials Positives (+) Negatives (-) Easier to maintain. One-time planting, less watering, less deadheading, less weeding. Short bloom time. Cost effective/good value in the long-run. More education/knowledge required than annuals. Hardy, lasting, enduring. Higher initial investment. Variety in color, shape, textures. Multiplies and invades or crowds other plants. Share with friends and neighbors – “We have bamboo that must be like the starter culture for great sourdough rolls. Everyone in the neighborhood has benefited.” [Portland] Grows too large. Fragrance. Correct pruning necessary to facilitate blooming. Dead stems etc. require clean-up.
    • 8. It’s an investment
      • Perennials are perceived as more cost effective and a better long-term investment because they are planted once and re-emerge every Spring.
        • “ I buy few annuals anymore because I got tired of having to keep replanting them.” [Portland]
      • With that being said, there are varying levels of ‘investment’ that consumers are willing to make.
      CAUTION: The younger generation will have their own balance of investment on this – with ‘instant gratification’ worth more….
    • 7. Investments are ‘long term’
      • Perennials are for people who plan to “STAY PUT”. It is an indicator that you are planning to stay where you are and ‘take up roots’. It is another form of ‘commitment’.
      • A woman in her 40’s or 50’s with grown kids.
      • Established or settled.
      • A sense of purpose.
      • Strong sense of pride in home and yard.
      • Works smart.
      • Committed to improving her environment and neighborhood.
      • Fastidious, attention to detail.
      • Experience in life and in gardening.
      • Very committed to gardening as a hobby.
    • 7. Investments are ‘long term’
      • Perennials are for people who plan to “STAY PUT”. It is an indicator that you are planning to stay where you are and ‘take up roots’. It is another form of ‘commitment’.
      Like bottles of wine – indicate those that are ‘ready to enjoy now’, drinkable in 2-3 years, or those that need to be cellared…
    • 6. Hardy!
      • Perennials are a far more forgiving plant. Consumers are drawn to this attractive component of them. LESS RISK! However, the trade off is severe – less bloom time!
        • “ The one thing that would make these perennials better is if they bloomed all season!”
      Hardy! Color!
    • 5. Multiply and Divide….and conquer!
      • Because many varieties multiply and have to be divided or thinned, they offer two unique opportunities:
        • They can be broken up and moved around to cover more garden space. This speaks to the ‘value’ to the consumer.
        • They can be broken up and given to others. This speaks to PRIDE, as the act of sharing is a direct reflection on their success.
      • Curiously, this also requires more ‘work’ on the part of the gardener, but does not seem to contribute to an overall sense of commitment required to maintain perennials.
      Know your audience! Younger gardeners will appreciate the ability to divide and spread – it adds value. More mature gardeners will love the pride that comes from sharing.
    • What Perennials Stand for…
    • 4. The ‘whaddayacallit???’
      • Blooming bushes such as azaleas, butterfly bushes, lilac bushes, etc. are often defined by consumers as perennial plants. The line between perennial plants and blooming bushes is not well defined.
      • Perennials suffer from a lack of common ‘vernacular’. Most varieties are unknown and most perennial growers are hard pressed to name more than a few varieties.
        • 50% of the respondents indicated they would buy more perennials if they were more familiar with them. Further – this was a significantly larger barrier for the younger gardener.
      • In an age of social networking, a lack of common names inhibits the spread of the word.
    • What would get gardeners to buy perennials they are not familiar with… Q26. When it comes to a perennial you are not familiar with, which of the following would get you to buy it? Base: Have purchased perennial plants within the last year (Total n=253) 4. The ‘whaddayacallit???’
    • 3. More and more retail outlets.
      • There appears to be more shopping for perennials within the mass market – ‘table stakes’ on plant health
    • Reasons for Store Preference Q24a. What is the main reason that [INSERT Q23b STORE] is your primary store for perennial plant purchases? Q24b. What are the other reasons [INSERT Q23b STORE] is your primary store for perennial plant purchases? Base: Have purchased perennial plants within the last year Home Depot (n=42) Lowe’s (n=48) Walmart (n=17) Local/ Independent Garden Center (n=112) It is within close proximity to my home 71% 44% 47% 41% Gardening department is neat and well organized 50% 56% 35% 25% Healthy/well cared for plants 45% 54% 12% 71% Plants that are well labeled with gardening instructions 43% 42% 29% 45% Broad selection - 'I know I will find what I am looking for' 36% 52% 29% 56% Knowledgeable and helpful sales associates 33% 31% 6% 56% The products sold here come with a money back guarantee if I'm not satisfied 33% 35% 24% 25% It's time efficient - I can purchase other needed items outside of the gardening category 31% 35% 41% 11% They have the best prices 31% 33% 41% 21% It is the place I have always shopped for plants 21% 19% 24% 38% Unique plants I may not find other places 17% 13% 18% 43%
    • Reasons For Leaving A Store
      • Unhealthy plants is the most often mentioned reason for why a person would leave a store.
      Q24c. Which of the following would be most likely to make you leave a store and shop somewhere else for perennial plants? Base: Have purchased perennial plants within the last year (Total n=253)
    • 2. Delight vs. confusion
      • There is a fine line between providing TOO MUCH product vs. TOO LITTLE product.
        • Locations with ‘too much’ become a time-sinking destination.
        • Locations with ‘too little’ are quickly dismissed as not offering anything ‘unique’
        • ORGANIZATION seems to be key.
        • “ Sometimes I have to drive right by my favorite nursery. They simply have too much! I go there and I can’t leave for hours!”
      • Although accepting of purchasing when not in bloom, the decision is easier if there is color/bloom at point-of-sale.
        • That said, one experienced gardener expressed concern about the nursery forcing the bloom and how that might affect the plant’s health.
      • Store associates or POP that can quickly outline a few perennial combinations that work make the decision process easier.
    • 1. Information seals the deal
      • The #1 source for information on perennials is the plant tag – ahead of friends and neighbors. This is different than annuals – where your neighbor is your #1 source of information.
    • 1. Information seals the deal
      • The #1 source for information on perennials is the plant tag – ahead of friends and neighbors. This is different than annuals – where your neighbor is your #1 source of information.
      • The information that is considered critical is as follows:
      • RECOGNIZABLE NAME!
      • Sun/shade/light needs.
      • Color of bloom (to match or contrast with other plants)
      • Height and width at maturity (including spacing).
      • Time of season it blooms and length of blooming.
      • Watering needs.
      • Soil conditions
      • Temperature tolerance.
      A name I know A name I know
    • Your perennial guide to success…..
      • 10. First is function
      • 9. With more perceived ‘ease of use’
      • 8. It’s an investment
      • 7. Investments are long term
      • 6. Hardy!
      • 5. Multiply and divide (and conquer!)
      • 4. The “whaddayacallit”
      • 3. More and more retail
      • 2. Delight vs. confusion
      • 1. Information seals the deal!
    • Gulf States Horticultural Expo 2012: How to Market Edibles
    • Why all of the craze??? Concern for the Environment…. Growing your own Veggies is good! Economic Pressure… Growing your own Veggies saves money! Concern for your health…. Home-grown is the Ultimate ‘chain of custody’
    • Methodology
      • Two step study. Qualitative focus groups followed by quantitative internet research.
      • Qualitative: 6 focus groups were conducted, 2 in each of the following locations – Chicago, IL, Charlotte, NC, and Portland, OR. Groups were 2 hours, and were conducted April 5, 6 and 19, 2010.
      • Quantitative: Online facilitated through national consumer panel. 340 vegetable gardener total responses.
      • Definition of a ‘new’ vegetable gardener was two years or less of veggie gardening experience.
      • In both studies, consumers met the following recruiting requirements:
        • Purchased minimum of $25 in vegetable plants in past year
        • Not a ‘master’ gardener
        • Mix of male and female gardeners
        • Traditional demographic distribution
        • Traditional marketing research screens
    • Home. Garden.
      • The overwhelming driver of beginning to garden is still purchasing a home. However, contrary to [our] popular believe, vegetable gardening is not necessarily the gateway drug. It is started in tandem with flowers.
      My first gardening efforts included BOTH vegetables and flowers!
    • Home. Garden.
      • Young children also inspire vegetable garden planting; it is viewed as a major teaching opportunity.
      • “ My daughter was very excited to plant a vegetable garden and actually talked me into doing it. She doesn’t help me that much, but I’m glad she inspired me to do it!”
      • A majority of vegetable gardeners had parents who cultivated vegetable gardens. It is a way to reconnect with childhood and family roots.
        • “ We always had a vegetable garden growing up. My mother is deceased and I thought it’s a good way to remember her.” [Charlotte]
      Sending vegetable gardening items home with school kids is a great way to get parents involved!
    • Out of sight, but in my mind.
      • The drivers of location:
        • 1. Sun
        • 2. Convenient access
        • 3. “out of sight”
      • The idea of ‘beautifying’ the vegetable garden was not appealing – as most gardeners viewed this space as purely functional, and therefore an investment in time or dollars to make it more attractive is not a value.
        • The idea of ‘more attractive’ edibles may not appeal to a gardener for their ‘veggie gardening’. However – the idea of incorporating good-looking edibles into FLOWER beds was not considered and may be highly valuable.
    • Out of sight, but in my mind.
      • It was surprising how many container vegetable gardens there were, even in some households that had yards. The advantages of a patio container garden:
        • Closer and more convenient for watering and harvesting.
        • Protected from deer, rabbits, snakes, etc.
        • May be the only location that ‘fits the bill’!
      Spark interest by merchandising veggie plants that are great in containers!
    • Vegetable gardening? Priceless.
      • ‘ Expense savings’ was never mentioned as a primary motivator of vegetable gardening. In fact, some aren’t sure how much they even save by having a vegetable garden.
      • When asked, only 4% of respondents had agreement with the statement that ‘vegetable gardening is an expensive project’.
      • It’s more about having fresh, healthy, nutritious, and great tasting vegetables for the family.
        • “ There’s nothing like picking stuff right out of your garden, bringing it inside, and making a big salad with it. You get so much extra pleasure out of the freshness, the fact that you put energy into it, and how great it tastes. [Portland]
      • Finally, there is a connection with the outdoors and a sense of environmental sustainability in vegetable gardening [especially in Portland].
      • The strengths and weaknesses of vegetable gardening are summarized on the following page
    • Strengths and Weaknesses of Vegetable Gardening Positives (+) Negatives (-) Much better taste Weeding hard work Healthier eating Watering work and time consuming Feeling of pride and accomplishment Dealing with critters very frustrating Self sufficiency Risk of failure Share with others Failure especially frustrating and disappointing Enjoy the outdoors Learning opportunity for children Encourages kids to eat their vegetables
    • Primary Reason for Vegetable Gardening
      • Nearly half of vegetable/herb gardeners name better taste as the primary reason they vegetable garden.
      10. Which statement best reflects your primary reason for vegetable gardening? Base: Have purchased vegetable plants within the last year (Total n=342) Younger gardeners are significantly more likely to be gardening to save money
    • Actual dollars….
      • On average, our sample spent $73 on their veggie/herb plants. While their total investment was probably higher, they still view this as an inexpensive project.
      S8. Over the last year, about how much did you spend on vegetable/herb plants? Base: Have purchased vegetable plants within the last year (Total n=342) Mean $73 $70 $85 $92 $66
    • Packed full of hardy flavor! 7a. How important is each of these when deciding which tomato variety to plant? The largest driver of the decision-making process for a variety comes from flavor. Things such as hardiness and disease resistance are also important – more so to the experienced gardener.
    • Vegetable Plant Shopping
      • Consumers still have at the top of their list ‘healthy product’ as the chief barrier to purchase. Not healthy = no purchase.
      • Characteristics influencing the purchase decision at point of sale:
        • Firm, sturdy, straight stalks.
        • Large size.
        • Moist, watered and well cared for.
        • Leaves deep green, not wilted, not brown or yellowing, no bugs.
        • Good root ball but not root bound.
        • Some seek out organic, perceived as healthier [especially in Portland].
        • Flowers or buds [discussed on peppers].
        • Price considered. Importance varied depending on the gardener.
    • And seed sales being up???
      • Respondents report the majority of the vegetables/herbs in their garden were purchased as plants. This is significantly higher in the US, as compared to Canada.
      5a. 0f the different vegetables/herbs you planted what percent are grown from seed and what percent are purchased as plants? Base: Have purchased vegetable plants within the last year (Total n=342) Letters indicate the value is significantly higher than the corresponding value at the 95% confidence level. Canadian gardeners are more likely than Americans to start with seeds – but for how long?
    • Seed vs. plant Vs.
      • Cost effective
      • Poses greater risk
      • Experienced gardeners more likely to employ
      • Especially associated with cucumbers, squash, carrots
      • More patient gardeners
      • Convenient
      • Greater likelihood of success
      • Especially associated with tomatoes and peppers
      • Experienced gardeners resort to plants when seeds don’t germinate well
      • Some gardeners only use plants; not willing to risk labor and investment
      • Instant gratification gardener
    • Convenience and breadth Q8a. What stores did you purchase vegetable/herb plants from [this season/last season]? Q8b. Which of these stores would you consider your primary store for vegetable/herb plants? Independent Garden centers are still favored over individual chains, but the mass market, combined, has the majority of this category.
    • Vegetable Plant Shopping
      • Consumers seem more apt to blame the ‘store’ when something goes wrong with their veggie purchases. Perhaps this is because they see these as easier to grow – and therefore not as subject to their own inadequacies.
      • Multiple stores are often shopped over the course of a season. Gardeners leave a store and seek out alternative retail locations when:
        • Plants do not look large, hardy, or moist and well cared for.
        • There is not enough depth in variety within a vegetable [especially important in tomatoes].
        • A specific vegetable the gardener wants is not available.
        • They are seeking a specific variety because it did well last year and it is not offered.
        • They want to check prices out elsewhere.
    • Vegetables/Herbs: Reasons for Store Preference
      • Gardeners that primarily shop at independent garden centers like the broad selection, well-cared for plants, and helpful staff.
      • Those shopping at home centers do so for the close proximity to their homes.
      9a. What is the main reason that [Q8b STORE] is your primary store for vegetable/herb plant purchases? 9b. What are the other reasons [INSERT Q8b STORE] is your primary store for vegetable/herb plant purchases? Base: Have purchased vegetable plants within the last year (Total n=342) Home Depot (n=60) Lowe’s (n=48) Walmart (n=29) Local/ Independent Garden Center (n=145) It is within close proximity to my home 62% 69% 45% 44% Healthy/well cared for plants 55% 60% 35% 77% Broad selection - 'I know I will find what I am looking for' 48% 56% 55% 56% Gardening department is neat and well organized 43% 58% 28% 23% Plants that are well labeled with gardening instructions 32% 38% 31% 34% Knowledgeable and helpful sales associates 28% 33% 10% 56% It's time efficient - I can purchase other needed items outside of the gardening category 28% 40% 45% 10% It is the place I have always shopped for plants 23% 27% 7% 32% The products sold here come with a money back guarantee if I'm not satisfied 22% 42% 14% 13% They have the best prices 18% 44% 55% 19%
      • Gardeners were aware of both the Bonnie and Burpee brands. Bonnie stood for the biodegradable pot. Burpee was associated as a heritage brand of higher quality.
      The first name in gardening. 15a. What brands of vegetable/herb plants come to mind, regardless of whether or not you have used them? In the box below, please type all brands that you can recall. If you do not know any brands, please check none. 15b. Which of the following brands of vegetable/herb plants have you ever heard of? Base: Have purchased vegetable plants within the last year (Total n=342)
    • Value Expectations: Burpee vs. Non-Branded
      • In order to understand what kind of premium gardeners might be willing to pay for a branded Burpee plant, we asked a series of questions to determine price expectations for a 4 inch standard size tomato plant.
      • The question follows: At what price would you consider this plant to be…
        • a good value?
        • getting expensive but would still consider it?
        • so expensive that you would no longer consider it?
        • so inexpensive that you would doubt its quality?
      • Half of the respondents answered these questions after viewing the Burpee brand (left below) and the other half answered these questions with regard to the non-branded (right below) plant. The comparison of the mean responses are shown on the following slide.
    • Value Expectations: Burpee vs. Non-Branded
      • Those viewing the branded Burpee tomato plant expected a higher price, on average, than those viewing the non-branded tomato plant.
        • The “good value” price for the Burpee plant was $3.90, almost $0.60 higher than the “good value” price for the non-branded tomato plant. This translates to about a 17% premium.
      16. Next, we’d like to understand how much you think the following tomato plant might be worth. At what price would you consider this plant (a standard 4&quot; size pot) to be… Base: Have purchased vegetable plants within the last year
    • Aim for the core!
      • Concepts and positioning that speaks first and foremost to flavor are the most interesting to the consumer.
      Base: Have purchased vegetable plants within the last year (Total n=342) 18. Please indicate how likely you would be to purchase this product idea by using the following 1-10 point scale. Letters indicate the value is significantly higher than the corresponding value at the 95% confidence level. Old Time Taste – likelihood to purchase 57% Want to grow tomatoes as sweet and plump as those you remember from your childhood? Or how about peppers that are packed with flavor? Burpee now brings you a special collection of those varieties that will deliver that “Old Time Taste” that you enjoy. Like Heirloom varieties, these are packed with great taste, but are easier to grow and more hardy in the garden. Easy to grow and even easier to enjoy!
      • CASUAL GARDENER
      • Age: 46
      • Years Gardening: 17
      • Dollars Spent: $95 A
      • Dollars Spent: $72 V
      • Main Motivations:
      • It is a reflection of me. I feel a responsibility to beautify it.
      • Gardening is a way to add value to my home
      • Gardening is good for the environment
      • Function/Outward driven
      • PLANTS ONCE FOR VEGGIES
      • Main Location: Home Depot*
      • ENTHUSIASTIC GARDENER
      • Age: 51
      • Years Gardening: 26
      • Dollars Spent: $128 A
      • Dollars Spent: $72 V
      • Main Motivations:
      • It is relaxing and reduces stress in my life.
      • Gardening helps me be less stressed
      • Gardening is a way to express my creativity
      • Beauty/Inward driven
      • PLANTS TWICE FOR VEGGIES
      • Main Location: IGC*
      It’s all about getting them comfortable.
    • Repeat visits…… 12. Which of the following best describes the timing of your vegetable and herb gardening? Base: Have purchased vegetable plants within the last year (Total n=342) Letters indicate the value is significantly higher than the corresponding value at the 95% confidence level. Shifting people to gardening ‘enthusiast increases IGC store visits.
    • Bill Calkins ~ [email_address] “ Flourish” ~ on Facebook @BillCalkins ~ on Twitter THANK YOU!