Don’t Create a Lousy Online
or Blended Course
Brian Bridges
California Learning Resource Network
bit.ly/lousycourse
Lousy Slides & Links

http://brianbridges.org
or
http://bit.ly/lousycourse
What this is not.
A tutorial
An LMS primer
What this is
Guidance
Quality criteria
Specific components needed
A few tool recommendations
California eLearning Census
Between the Tipping Point and Critical Mass
http://clrn.org/census/
2013 Responses
 March 1 – May 1
 516 Responses


29% of 1777

 144 Direct-Funded Charters
 372 Districts
 263 K-12/9...
Who is eLearning?

516 districts
& charters
46%
eLearning by Grade Span

73%

19%
eLearning: Charters vs. Districts
Who wants to eLearn?

26%
Who wants, by grade span

K-5/K-8

K-12/9-12
Who Wants, by Type

27%
Full and Part-time Online
Learning Populations

100.9K

23%
Increase
19.8K

24.4K

17%
Increase
Blended and Virtual Medians
Medians Increase by 25%
100
Blended Model Breakdown
2012
Blended Model Breakdown:
2013
2013: K-5/K-8 Blended Model
Breakdown
2012: K-12/9-12 Blended Model
Breakdown
2013: K-12/9-12 Blended Model
Breakdown

28%

37%
Course Publisher Distribution
2012
Course Publisher Distribution
2013
2013:
Self-Built Courses and OER

87%
What factors did you consider
when selecting courseware?
77%
60%
60%
55%
42%
42%
6%
Between the Tipping Point and
Critical Mass
What is CLRN?
 California eLearning Census
 CLRN.org/census

 eLearning Strategies Symposium





December 6-7, 201...
Courses
Content Standards: 80%
iNACOL Course Standards: 80%
15 Power Standards
Commercial Courses Only
Analysis of the
First 371
 175courses (47%) certified
 40 courses (12%) only missing captions
 Most common problem
Con...
What about U.C. AG?
I’m so glad you asked.
CLRN & U.C. Partnership
CLRN Certified FAQs
The FAQs
So you want to create an online or
blended course
After all, you’re a master of your curriculum and
teaching craft.
Remember Year 1?
It’s that, times 10.
A great f2f course doesn’t make a
great online/blended course
Take time to plan
MOOC Preparation
“Bioelectricity: A Quantitative
Approach
Eight-week course
300+ hours to prepare
Filmed 97 video segm...
MOOC Gone Bad
Coursera: Fundamentals of
Online Education: Planning and
Application.
Mass chaos & cancellation
Lessons from a MOOC
Gone Bad
Successful group activities need:
Clear and detailed instructions.
A thorough description o...
Building a Course
Why?
Who are your customers?
What are their skills and limitations?
School & home technology access
...
Keeping Pace Planning
Keeping Pace Planning
18 month planning process
Strategic Planning
Needs analysis
Stakeholder involvement
Program definition
 Identifying models, courses & teachers

...
Collect Data
Assess your technology infrastructure
Determine your students’ and
teachers’ technology skills
Research th...
Course Development
Course development PD
Research standards-based content
Designing infrastructure
Budgeting
Piloting
Piloting select content
Community outreach
Course quality check
Program evaluation
Get Thee a Learning
Management System (LMS)
And make nice with your IT department
If you give a teacher an LMS,
She’ll want access to begin playing with it.
If she begins playing with it,
She’ll want to s...
Learning Management Systems

24%

39%
Prerequisite Skills:
Technology
Master your LMS
Web 2.0: Collect & be proficient
 Discussion groups
 Slide sharing
 L...
Web 2 oh
SlideShare
DropBox / DropCanvas /
BlendSpace
Screenr
OCR Page
Wils browse
Software/web 2
SlideShare
Presentation sharing site
Uploads a variety of formats
Add YouTube videos to presentations
Provides embed c...
SlideShare REview
SlideShare Site
DropBox
Cloud and Cross-Platform File Sharing
iPhone/iPad/Android Sharing
2 - 18 GB storage
Dropbox.com
DropBox Review
DropBox Sharing Folders
DROPitTOme
Remote DropBox Upload
Customers don’t need a
DropBox account
http://dropitto.me
CLRN Review
dropittome

dropitto.me/bbridges
51
Dropcanvas: Quickly
Share Files
Web based
Account not required
5GB limit per canvas
DropCanvas Site
DropCanvas Demo
Playlists
Assembling resources for a Flipped
Classroom
Blendspace
Share, Flip, Teach

(formerly Edcanvas):

Upload a variety of resources
Share with students
Comment
Adding Classes
Screenr:
Web-based Screencast Creator
Web-based screen & audio capturing tool
Creates flash or QT videos up to 5
minutes...
Screenr Screens
Screenr Publishing
Commercial
Alternatives
iShowU
 Mac: $30, not including Ed discount

Snagit
 $50, but often much cheaper

Camtasia
 ...
Build or Buy
Or both.
Content
A2. The course content and
assignments are aligned with the
state’s content standards…
 Is the course teaching, ...
Content
Text
Video (streaming and/or lectures)
Simulations / games
Supplemental commercial resources
Commercial onlin...
A Textbook is
not a course
If it were, you could just throw the
kid a book and tell them to read it.
Content
B3: The course content and
assignments are of sufficient rigor,
depth and breadth to teach the
standards being ad...
Your course should be
better than the worst
teacher at your school
Engaging
B3: The course instruction and
activities engage students in active
learning.*
Reading and watching are not
act...
B3 Consideration
The course provides multiple opportunities
for students to be actively engaged in the
content that inclu...
It’s about Pedagogy
How will you engage students?
What authentic projects will you use
for practice and assessment?
How...
Lower Order Thinking
Skills
B5. The course provides opportunities
for students to engage in higherorder thinking, critica...
B5 Consideration
Assignments, activities, and assessments
provide opportunities for student to
elevate their thinking bey...
Media Rich
B11. Students have access to
resources that enrich the course
content.
D4. Rich media are provided in
multipl...
Rich Media Defined
Course makes maximum use of the
robust capabilities of the online
medium through narration,
demonstrat...
Flipping Tips
It doesn’t have to be about you.
 There are other great lecture sources, you know.

Carefully consider wh...
Clip Sources
Khan
iTunes University
Record your own
Streaming video publishers
iTunes U Interface
iTunes U: Physics

This goes on for 38 minutes
iTunes U: Five Minute Spanish
Commercial Lecture
Publishers
Educator.com
Brightstorm.com
Educator.com
Accessible
Just what part of “all students should
have access” didn’t you get?
Accessible
D10. Course materials and activities
are designed to provide appropriate
access to all students. *
USDOJ/DOE Dear
Colleague Letter & FAQ
Providing Closed
Captions
Utilize YouTube captions (beta)
Create captions
Provide a transcript
Short demo of current YouTube
caption machine.
You know what they say about good intentions.
Universal
Subtitles:

Encode Videos with Your
Subtitles

Web-based platform for
adding
subtitles/translations.
Very easy...
US1
Universal Subtitles
Play subtitled video from U.S. site
Copy embed code
Download subtitle file (text and
timing codes)
Prerequisite Skills:
Teaching
Leading Edge Certification
Leading Edge Certification
What is LEC?
Highly-qualified online educator
Based on iNACOL’s National Standards for
Quality Online Teaching
Focused ...
LEC Modules
Online Learning: History & Concepts
Pedagogy
Building Community
Online Accessibility
Assessment and Evalu...
Professional
Development
E7. Course instructors… have been
provided professional development in the
behavioral, social, a...
Formative Assessments
Should Inform Instruction
B4. The course and course instructor
provide students with multiple
learn...
Variety is a Good Thing
There are more tools than multiple
choice tests
Assessments
C2. The course structure includes
adequate and appropriate methods
and procedures to assess students’
mastery...
C2 Consideration
C2. Assessment types are matched
to the level of knowledge being
tested. Both formative assessments
(tha...
Variety
C3. Ongoing, varied, and frequent
assessments are conducted
throughout the course to inform
instruction. *
Student Progress
C4. Assessment strategies and tools
make the student continuously
aware of his/her progress in class
and...
e-Learning Strategies Symposium
eLearning Strategies
Symposium
 CLRN/CUE partnership
 December 6-7, 2013
 Hilton Orange County/Costa Mesa
http://elear...
Lousy Slides & Links

http://brianbridges.org
Or
http://bit.ly/lousycourse
Don’t Create a Lousy Online or
Blended Course
Brian Bridges, CLRN
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course
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Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course

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  • Need to add the MOOC gone bad story.
  • The California Learning Resource Network (CLRN), a state-funded technology project that reviews online courses, conducts an annual eLearning Census to take the online and blended learning temperature of California’s public school districts and direct-funded charters. After building a database of more than 1000 school districts and 763 direct-funded charter schools, we began contacting them on March 1st, to report both online and blended student populations, courseware selection, and blended models in use. These results are from 516 district and charter schools, representing 29% of the overall population. Our 2013 Census report, Between the Tipping Point and Critical Mass, may be downloaded from clrn.org/census.
    California eLearning Census
    March 1, 2013 – May 1, 2013
    1777 K-12 districts & direct-funded charters
    1014 + 763 (43% charters)
    Results from 516 districts (29%)
  • While charters make up 43% of all school entities, just 28% of our responses came from direct-funded charters. Census data from locally controlled charters is included in district data and was not separated out. Direct-funded charters, though, are independent entities controlled by their own governing board. In addition, we’ve disaggregated data from both elementary (K-8 or K-5) institutions and unified school districts (K-12 or 9-12) institutions.
  • So, how many districts are implementing online learning? We found that 46% of all districts and charters indicated they were using some form of online or blended learning. While last year’s data indicated that we may have passed online learning’s tipping point, this year’s census seems to indicate that online and blended learning is firmly entrenched in California’s schools and that we are in the period between the tipping point and critical mass.
  • Are online and blended learning being adopted at different rates and in different modes at elementary and unified districts? In 2012, 16% of elementary districts reported students were learning online. In 2013, the number of districts and charters involved increased to 19%. However, in unified and high school districts, 68% learned online in 2012, while 73% reported online and blended students in 2013.
    253 K-8 districts; 48 are elearning (19%), up from 16% in 2012
    263 K-12/9-12 districts; 191 are elearning (72%)
  • eLearning adoption even varies between charter schools and school districts. While last year’s adoption was fairly consistent between the two, in 2013, 53% of charters and 44% of districts indicated they were supporting eLearning.
    77 of 144 Charters elearn
    162 of 372 districts elearn
  • If Districts and charters weren’t involved in eLearning, we asked them if they were currently discussing or planning to implement online learning . 26% shared they were currently in the planning stages
    72 of 273
  • However, unified and high school districts and charters are more invested in investigating online learning than elementary districts. Just 20% of (40 of the 201) K-8 districts that are not elearning, say they are planning to implement it, while 44% of the unified and high school districts and charters
    (32 of 72) are planning to implement online and blended learning.
  • Desire to implement eLearning is fairly equal between districts and direct-funded charter schools with slightly more districts in the planning process. 24% of direct-funded charters plan to implement eLearning as compared with 27% of school districts.
  • Actual population numbers have increased too. In 2012, we counted 19,820 full-time online (virtual) students In 2013, those numbers increased to 24,383 virtual students.
    and 86,257 blended students.
    Last year, we counted just more than 86K blended students, but this year’s total is just under 100,882 blended students. This represents a 23% increase in the number of full-time virtual students and a 17% increase in blended learning.
    Virtual: 19,820
    (N: 60 (50% district, 50% charters)
    Blended: 86,675
    N:172 (75% districts, 24% charters)
    2013 Virtual: 24,383
    2013 Blended: 100,882
  • Median populations, though, are often more telling. The median, the point where half the districts have more than the number and half have less also increased in 2013.
    Last year, half of California’s districts and charters had more than 80 students blending their learning while this year the median rose to 100. Last year, the median number of virtual students was 56 full-time online students, but in 2013, the median blended population rose to 100 students. Both median populations increased 25% 2013.
    2013: 69 districts reported full-time virtual students
    2013 Medians: Blended-100; Virtual -70
  • In 2012, the most popular blended model was Self Blend, which the Innosight Institute has just renamed the “Al la Carte” model, followed by the Enriched-Virtual, a model used by Independent Study schools in California. This seems to indicate that non-consumers, students who are using eLearning to supplement their transcript or schools that provide online courses not offered in the classroom, are a driving force.
    We also found that 31% of districts and direct-funded charters are utilizing more than one blended learning model.
    Self Blend: 60%
    Enriched-Virtual: 36%
    Rotation: 29%
    Flex: 17%
  • In 2013, though, the Rotation method overtook the Self-Blend (46% to 40%) followed in third by Enriched Virtual.
    This year, 34% of districts and direct-funded charters reported they are utilizing more than one blended learning model.
    Self Blend: 60%
    Enriched-Virtual: 36%
    Rotation: 29%
    Flex: 17%
  • When separating elementary and unified districts, though, we found that the predominate model in elementary districts was the Rotation method, followed by 80% of districts and charters. Just 15% of elementary districts indicated they were using more than one blended model.
    6 of 40 had two blended models in place.
  • In unified and high school districts last year, the predominate blended model was the Self-Blend followed by Enriched Virtual.
  • This year, though, the numbers flipped a little with 48% reporting using the Self-Blend, followed by the Rotation and Enriched Virtual models. 38% of these districts report using more than one blended model.
  • Last year, the dominate course publishers included Apex, K12 and their subsidiary Aventa, and Cyber High. In 2012, nearly a quarter of all districts purchased courseware from more than one provider.
  • While California’s schools purchase online courses from a variety of publishers and providers, the top four players are nearly the same as 2012: Apex Learning, Aventa, Cyber High and Odysseyware. We found it interesting that a substantial number of districts are creating their own courses.
    However, while 23% of districts purchased courses from more than one vendor in 2012, 46% of districts and charters utilized multiple publishers in 2013. This seems to both confirm virtual and blended learning’s expansion and districts’ willingness to select courses that meet the needs of specific populations.
  • Districts creating their own courses or blending their learning primarily utilized the Kahn Academy, dominating at 87%, unchanged from 2012.
  • As the census drew to a close, we sent a supplemental survey to those districts that were purchasing courses, asking them about their selection process. When asked what factors they considered when selecting courseware, the top four choices were price, comparing courses to content standards, the U.C. A-G approved list, and examined course outlines. Sadly, few districts realize that by selecting from the UC A-G Approved courses, they’re also depending on CLRN’s certified course reviews.
    None 1 0%
    Selected only CLRN Certified courses. 3 6%
    Colleague recommendation 17 32%
    Vendor demonstration 22 42%
    Data supplied by curriculum provider 22 42%
    Examined course outlines 29 55%
    U.C. A-G list 32 60%
    Compared the course to the content standards 32
    Price 41 77%
  • CLRN created the California eLearning Census to track both the growth and variety of online and blended learning in California. One of our motivations was Clayton Christensen’s and Michael Horn’s book, Disrupting Class, which predicted that online and blended learning would reach a tipping point in 2013 and that by 2019, 50% of all high school courses would be online. Our second annual census indicates a definite increase in both numbers and usage. Whether it’s the 25% increase in median populations or the 17% increase in total population; whether it’s knowing that nearly half the districts are selecting courseware from more than one publisher as compared with just 24% last year; or whether it’s the increase in average population or the distribution of blended models, online and blended learning are firmly entrenched in California’s schools. We’re now in the period between the tipping point and critical mass where eLearning will continue to grow, evolve, and mature. CLRN is here, helping to improve online and blending courses by reporting how they meet the Common Core State Standards, California’s other content standards, AND iNACOL’s national standards for quality online courses. Our partnership with the University of California ensures that no online course will receive approval for their A-G requirements unless CLRN has reviewed and certified it. CLRN”s reviews may be found at CLRN.org.
  • Flipped classrooms and the Khan Academy have received national attention as teachers place classroom lectures online and change classroom pedagogy to include project-based work. You may even be thinking of creating an online or blended course yourself. After all, you’ve taught for many years and you’re a master of your curriculum and teaching craft, so those skills should benefit you in creating an online course.
     
    Think again.
     
    Remember how, during your first year of teaching, you spent countless nights creating lesson plans and units only to throw most of them away the following summer? Remember how difficult that first year was? Multiply that times 10 and you’ll have your first year of online or blended learning. I’m not saying, “Don’t do it.” I’m saying that you should go in with both eyes wide open, following the advice I’ve shared below.
  • Planning
    Most successful projects begin with a thorough planning process that engages stakeholders, reviews research, and carves out a plan that solves a specific problem. Planning for online or blended learning is no different.
     
    This year’s Keeping Pace < http://kpk12.com/>, an annual census report and analysis of the online and blended landscape, includes a proposed 18th month planning process with specific tasks for each phase. In the Systemic Planning stage, you bring together stakeholders and perform a needs analysis that asks: 1) What’s the problem you hope to solve? 2) What is your educational goal? 3) Who are the intended student groups? and 4) What are your district’s capabilities and desires?
     
    That’s just the beginning, though, because before creating a solution, you also need to assess your technology infrastructure, your students’ and teachers’ technology skills, the availability of quality, standards-aligned resources, and teacher professional development.
     
    But, assuming you’ve completed a planning process and targeted specific student groups or courses to affect, what’s next?
  • Probably the single largest decision is which LMS to purchase.
    It impacts teachers and students.
  • Whether you rent an existing course management system like BlackBoard or install an open source solution like Moodle or Course Builder, an LMS is a framework that contains your content, activities, and assessments, allowing you to track student progress and conduct online asynchronous and synchronous meetings. Whichever direction you choose, spend time mastering all the LMS’ components: installing curriculum, creating class rosters, embedding outside activities, and setting up discussion groups. Don’t start without an LMS, though.
  • Finally, we enquired about the learning management systems districts are using to host online or blended courses. While most publishers or providers provide their own LMS, we found a significant number of districts were using Edmodo, followed by Moodle or it’s variations and Haiku. Not far down the list, surprisingly, are district created learning management systems.
  • Probably the easiest way to begin looking for web links is through the QUICK SEARCH. The main functions of the Web Info Links Collection is accessed via a drop down menu feature on the home page.
  • But, assuming you’ve completed a planning process and targeted specific student groups or courses to affect, what’s next?
     
    Normally, I’d suggest at this point a discussion about whether to build or to buy. Should you build courses from scratch (and do you have the capabilities to do so) or should you shop for quality courseware that you can pilot for a year or more?
     
    But, you’ve already made the decision to create a lousy course, so let’s proceed.
  • Standards-aligned, engaging content can be purchased from a publisher, found in open source repositories, or created in-house.
  • With iNACOL standard A2 stating, “The course content and assignments are aligned with the state’s content standards..”, you want to make sure that the content you provide students not only teaches (demonstrates) a skill, but also provides students opportunities to practice and assess each skill or standard. CLRN’s reviews include these three components of each standard identified for a course.
  • Your textbook is not a course though. While textbooks are aligned with the standards and may include practice activities and assessments, placing your book online, be it commercial or open source, is amateurish at best.
    Quality courses will include text though, but not entire chapters printed screen after screen. The better courses CLRN have reviewed include portions of text mixed with video lecture clips, streaming video, simulations, games, and short formative assessments. Creating quality online lessons is a much more time-consuming task than creating face-to-face lessons. Provide ample lead-time to create online lessons.
  • Online course standard B3 states that course instruction and activities must engage students in active learning, including authentic projects and activities that challenge students beyond knowledge and comprehension. Rather than focus primarily on multiple-choice tests for assessments, it’s best to provide students knowledge work where they create, evaluate, and analyze. Students should regularly participate in online discussion groups, be they synchronous or asynchronous.
  • Your school built wheel chair ramps even though you may not have had any students with that need because some day a parent, student, or teacher WILL have that need. You also did it because the Federal government made you, but it was the right thing to do, yes? Of course. We want all students to have equal access to a quality education.
    Should that be any different with online courses? eLearning’s equivalent of a wheel chair ramp is accessible media, particularly narrated presentations and video lectures.
    Accessibility requirements for electronic media was confirmed by a US Department Of Justice letter to college presidents. In it, the DOJ reviewed its lawsuit against universities that had piloted the Kindle DX, which the DOJ won because the Kindle DX did not have a text to speech function. The letter states, “It is unacceptable for universities to use emerging technology without insisting that this technology be accessible to all students.”
    USDOJ/DOE Dear Colleague Letter
    On May 26, 2011, the Office of Civil Rights issued a set of Frequently Asked Questions about the Dear Colleague Letter. In it, the DOJ reminds K12 education that they too must ensure technologies are accessible to all students.
    USDOE, Office of Civil Rights
    FAQ About the June 29, 2010 Dear Colleague Letter
    PDF version of the FAQ
    See page 4, question 7.
    Accessibility criteria for online courses was pioneered by the Texas Virtual School Network (TxVSN) which has created a detailed site, TxVSN Accessibility, with advice, criteria, and check lists. Here are their Accessibility Guidelines.
    One of CLRN’s requirements when reviewing courses is that all narrated presentations and videos include transcripts or Closed Captions.
    So, yes, when you’re constructing an online course, your customers, and the Office of Civil Rights, expects that course materials are accessible. There are free resources to assist you, including Universal Subtitles, which can be used to embed captions within YouTube videos.
    Make use of them.
  • All teaching and learning materials must be accessible to all students. Period. If you’re creating video lectures, streaming video clips, or providing narrated presentations, each must either have closed-captions or a transcript. Online standard D10, and the Department of Justice, expects it and your students deserve it. Sites like Universal Subtitles http://www.universalsubtitles.org/ are easy to use and allow your captioned videos to play from their site, or you may download the time codes to upload to YouTube.
  • Professional Development
    While you may feel like you’ve mastered your craft when teaching face-to-face, teaching an online or blended course requires a different skill set and mastery of different tools. In an online poll we conducted, online teachers recommended that newly converted online teachers master the following tools before beginning to create an online or blended course: 1) SlideShare < http://www.slideshare.net/> or a similar online presentation tool; 2) Collaborative meeting tools and related skills to set-up and conduct online discussions; 3) Portfolio creation tools for students to assemble examples of their authentic work; 4) Synchronous presentation skills because teaching “live” to online students offers completely different challenges and requires new solutions; and 5) Universal Subtitles for creating closed-captions.
     
    One avenue of professional development is the Leading Edge Certification (LEC) for online teachers. The 45-hour LEC course includes units in online pedagogy, building an online community, accessibility, assessment, and preparation. Based on iNACOL’s Quality Standards for Online Teachers, LEC < http://leadingedgecertification.org/> provides an opportunity to become a highly-qualified online educator.
  • That there are a variety of assessments too. Find the right assessment for what is being taught.
  • Online and blended learning are growing quickly for a reason. These courses can help personalize learning, allowing schools to vastly expand their course catalogs, and providing students the opportunity to learn any time, any place, any path, or at any pace. We understand your eagerness to provide an online or blended option to your students. Before jumping into the water, though, we just ask that you learn to swim. Anyone can create a lousy course. It takes time, talent, and perseverance to create a great one.
  • Don't Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course

    1. 1. Don’t Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course Brian Bridges California Learning Resource Network bit.ly/lousycourse
    2. 2. Lousy Slides & Links http://brianbridges.org or http://bit.ly/lousycourse
    3. 3. What this is not. A tutorial An LMS primer
    4. 4. What this is Guidance Quality criteria Specific components needed A few tool recommendations
    5. 5. California eLearning Census Between the Tipping Point and Critical Mass http://clrn.org/census/
    6. 6. 2013 Responses  March 1 – May 1  516 Responses  29% of 1777  144 Direct-Funded Charters  372 Districts  263 K-12/9-12 Districts/charters  253 K-5/K-8 Districts/charters
    7. 7. Who is eLearning? 516 districts & charters 46%
    8. 8. eLearning by Grade Span 73% 19%
    9. 9. eLearning: Charters vs. Districts
    10. 10. Who wants to eLearn? 26%
    11. 11. Who wants, by grade span K-5/K-8 K-12/9-12
    12. 12. Who Wants, by Type 27%
    13. 13. Full and Part-time Online Learning Populations 100.9K 23% Increase 19.8K 24.4K 17% Increase
    14. 14. Blended and Virtual Medians Medians Increase by 25% 100
    15. 15. Blended Model Breakdown 2012
    16. 16. Blended Model Breakdown: 2013
    17. 17. 2013: K-5/K-8 Blended Model Breakdown
    18. 18. 2012: K-12/9-12 Blended Model Breakdown
    19. 19. 2013: K-12/9-12 Blended Model Breakdown 28% 37%
    20. 20. Course Publisher Distribution 2012
    21. 21. Course Publisher Distribution 2013
    22. 22. 2013: Self-Built Courses and OER 87%
    23. 23. What factors did you consider when selecting courseware? 77% 60% 60% 55% 42% 42% 6%
    24. 24. Between the Tipping Point and Critical Mass
    25. 25. What is CLRN?  California eLearning Census  CLRN.org/census  eLearning Strategies Symposium     December 6-7, 2013 Hilton, Costa Mesa http://elearns.org @elearns
    26. 26. Courses Content Standards: 80% iNACOL Course Standards: 80% 15 Power Standards Commercial Courses Only
    27. 27. Analysis of the First 371  175courses (47%) certified  40 courses (12%) only missing captions  Most common problem Content standards alignment  93 courses (27%)< 80% content standards Range from 4% met to 78% met
    28. 28. What about U.C. AG? I’m so glad you asked.
    29. 29. CLRN & U.C. Partnership
    30. 30. CLRN Certified FAQs
    31. 31. The FAQs
    32. 32. So you want to create an online or blended course After all, you’re a master of your curriculum and teaching craft.
    33. 33. Remember Year 1? It’s that, times 10. A great f2f course doesn’t make a great online/blended course Take time to plan
    34. 34. MOOC Preparation “Bioelectricity: A Quantitative Approach Eight-week course 300+ hours to prepare Filmed 97 video segments with screen sharing 22 GB of data files
    35. 35. MOOC Gone Bad Coursera: Fundamentals of Online Education: Planning and Application. Mass chaos & cancellation
    36. 36. Lessons from a MOOC Gone Bad Successful group activities need: Clear and detailed instructions. A thorough description of the purpose of the assignment Access to technical tools that effectively support group collaboration
    37. 37. Building a Course Why? Who are your customers? What are their skills and limitations? School & home technology access Virtual or Blended  Which blended model?
    38. 38. Keeping Pace Planning
    39. 39. Keeping Pace Planning 18 month planning process
    40. 40. Strategic Planning Needs analysis Stakeholder involvement Program definition  Identifying models, courses & teachers Buy-in
    41. 41. Collect Data Assess your technology infrastructure Determine your students’ and teachers’ technology skills Research the availability of quality, standards-aligned resources Determine teacher professional development needed
    42. 42. Course Development Course development PD Research standards-based content Designing infrastructure Budgeting
    43. 43. Piloting Piloting select content Community outreach Course quality check Program evaluation
    44. 44. Get Thee a Learning Management System (LMS) And make nice with your IT department
    45. 45. If you give a teacher an LMS, She’ll want access to begin playing with it. If she begins playing with it, She’ll want to spend time understanding its different components Once she understands the LMS’ features, She’ll want to begin hanging content and classes into it. But first, she’ll need some Web. 2.0 tools.
    46. 46. Learning Management Systems 24% 39%
    47. 47. Prerequisite Skills: Technology Master your LMS Web 2.0: Collect & be proficient  Discussion groups  Slide sharing  Lecture recording & tutorial creation  Portfolio creation
    48. 48. Web 2 oh SlideShare DropBox / DropCanvas / BlendSpace Screenr
    49. 49. OCR Page
    50. 50. Wils browse
    51. 51. Software/web 2
    52. 52. SlideShare Presentation sharing site Uploads a variety of formats Add YouTube videos to presentations Provides embed codes
    53. 53. SlideShare REview
    54. 54. SlideShare Site
    55. 55. DropBox Cloud and Cross-Platform File Sharing iPhone/iPad/Android Sharing 2 - 18 GB storage Dropbox.com
    56. 56. DropBox Review
    57. 57. DropBox Sharing Folders
    58. 58. DROPitTOme Remote DropBox Upload Customers don’t need a DropBox account http://dropitto.me
    59. 59. CLRN Review
    60. 60. dropittome dropitto.me/bbridges 51
    61. 61. Dropcanvas: Quickly Share Files Web based Account not required 5GB limit per canvas
    62. 62. DropCanvas Site
    63. 63. DropCanvas Demo
    64. 64. Playlists Assembling resources for a Flipped Classroom
    65. 65. Blendspace Share, Flip, Teach (formerly Edcanvas): Upload a variety of resources Share with students Comment
    66. 66. Adding Classes
    67. 67. Screenr: Web-based Screencast Creator Web-based screen & audio capturing tool Creates flash or QT videos up to 5 minutes A variety of ways to publish  Via Twitter  Embed code  Downloadable QuickTime file  Through Screenr URL  Upload to YouTube
    68. 68. Screenr Screens
    69. 69. Screenr Publishing
    70. 70. Commercial Alternatives iShowU  Mac: $30, not including Ed discount Snagit  $50, but often much cheaper Camtasia  Mac: $99  Win: $299
    71. 71. Build or Buy Or both.
    72. 72. Content A2. The course content and assignments are aligned with the state’s content standards…  Is the course teaching, providing practice, and assessing each standard?
    73. 73. Content Text Video (streaming and/or lectures) Simulations / games Supplemental commercial resources Commercial online/blended courses
    74. 74. A Textbook is not a course If it were, you could just throw the kid a book and tell them to read it.
    75. 75. Content B3: The course content and assignments are of sufficient rigor, depth and breadth to teach the standards being addressed. *  Develop, Practice, Assess
    76. 76. Your course should be better than the worst teacher at your school
    77. 77. Engaging B3: The course instruction and activities engage students in active learning.* Reading and watching are not active.
    78. 78. B3 Consideration The course provides multiple opportunities for students to be actively engaged in the content that includes meaningful and authentic learning experiences such as collaborative learning groups, student‐led review sessions, games, analysis or reactions to videos, discussions, concept mapping, analyzing case studies, etc
    79. 79. It’s about Pedagogy How will you engage students? What authentic projects will you use for practice and assessment? How will students collaborate and participate in discussions?
    80. 80. Lower Order Thinking Skills B5. The course provides opportunities for students to engage in higherorder thinking, critical reasoning activities and thinking in increasingly complex ways. *
    81. 81. B5 Consideration Assignments, activities, and assessments provide opportunities for student to elevate their thinking beyond knowledge and comprehension into the realm of analyzing situations, synthesizing information, or evaluating an argument. Activities should include open‐ended questions, and encourage students to categorize and classify information.
    82. 82. Media Rich B11. Students have access to resources that enrich the course content. D4. Rich media are provided in multiple formats for ease of use and access in order to address diverse student needs.*
    83. 83. Rich Media Defined Course makes maximum use of the robust capabilities of the online medium through narration, demonstrations, simulations, animations, streaming content, and video lectures. Rich media is present enough to be noticed.
    84. 84. Flipping Tips It doesn’t have to be about you.  There are other great lecture sources, you know. Carefully consider what lesson parts to flip. Find a partner. Address student technology access early. Find a way to engage students  Don’t just talk. Ask questions. Frame discussion items.
    85. 85. Clip Sources Khan iTunes University Record your own Streaming video publishers
    86. 86. iTunes U Interface
    87. 87. iTunes U: Physics This goes on for 38 minutes
    88. 88. iTunes U: Five Minute Spanish
    89. 89. Commercial Lecture Publishers Educator.com Brightstorm.com
    90. 90. Educator.com
    91. 91. Accessible Just what part of “all students should have access” didn’t you get?
    92. 92. Accessible D10. Course materials and activities are designed to provide appropriate access to all students. *
    93. 93. USDOJ/DOE Dear Colleague Letter & FAQ
    94. 94. Providing Closed Captions Utilize YouTube captions (beta) Create captions Provide a transcript
    95. 95. Short demo of current YouTube caption machine. You know what they say about good intentions.
    96. 96. Universal Subtitles: Encode Videos with Your Subtitles Web-based platform for adding subtitles/translations. Very easy to use
    97. 97. US1
    98. 98. Universal Subtitles Play subtitled video from U.S. site Copy embed code Download subtitle file (text and timing codes)
    99. 99. Prerequisite Skills: Teaching Leading Edge Certification
    100. 100. Leading Edge Certification
    101. 101. What is LEC? Highly-qualified online educator Based on iNACOL’s National Standards for Quality Online Teaching Focused on how tools are implemented to improve teaching and learning 45-60 hours Course + portfolio = certification
    102. 102. LEC Modules Online Learning: History & Concepts Pedagogy Building Community Online Accessibility Assessment and Evaluation Policies and Preparation
    103. 103. Professional Development E7. Course instructors… have been provided professional development in the behavioral, social, and when necessary, emotional, aspects of the learning environment. E8. Course instructors…receive instructor professional development, which includes the support and use of a variety of communication modes to stimulate student engagement online.
    104. 104. Formative Assessments Should Inform Instruction B4. The course and course instructor provide students with multiple learning paths, based on student needs that engage students in a variety of ways.*
    105. 105. Variety is a Good Thing There are more tools than multiple choice tests
    106. 106. Assessments C2. The course structure includes adequate and appropriate methods and procedures to assess students’ mastery of content. *
    107. 107. C2 Consideration C2. Assessment types are matched to the level of knowledge being tested. Both formative assessments (that inform and support learning) and summative assessments (that demonstrate mastery) are a part of the course structure
    108. 108. Variety C3. Ongoing, varied, and frequent assessments are conducted throughout the course to inform instruction. *
    109. 109. Student Progress C4. Assessment strategies and tools make the student continuously aware of his/her progress in class and mastery of the content. *
    110. 110. e-Learning Strategies Symposium
    111. 111. eLearning Strategies Symposium  CLRN/CUE partnership  December 6-7, 2013  Hilton Orange County/Costa Mesa http://elearns.org Twitter: elearns
    112. 112. Lousy Slides & Links http://brianbridges.org Or http://bit.ly/lousycourse
    113. 113. Don’t Create a Lousy Online or Blended Course Brian Bridges, CLRN

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