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  • Standards-aligned, engaging content can be purchased from a publisher, found in open source repositories, or created in-house.
  • With iNACOL standard A2 stating, “The course content and assignments are aligned with the state’s content standards..”, you want to make sure that the content you provide students not only teaches (demonstrates) a skill, but also provides students opportunities to practice and assess each skill or standard. CLRN’s reviews include these three components of each standard identified for a course.
  • Your textbook is not a course though. While textbooks are aligned with the standards and may include practice activities and assessments, placing your book online, be it commercial or open source, is amateurish at best. Quality courses will include text though, but not entire chapters printed screen after screen. The better courses CLRN have reviewed include portions of text mixed with video lecture clips, streaming video, simulations, games, and short formative assessments. Creating quality online lessons is a much more time-consuming task than creating face-to-face lessons. Provide ample lead-time to create online lessons.
  • Online course standard B3 states that course instruction and activities must engage students in active learning, including authentic projects and activities that challenge students beyond knowledge and comprehension. Rather than focus primarily on multiple-choice tests for assessments, it’s best to provide students knowledge work where they create, evaluate, and analyze. Students should regularly participate in online discussion groups, be they synchronous or asynchronous.
  • That there are a variety of assessments too. Find the right assessment for what is being taught.
  • All teaching and learning materials must be accessible to all students. Period. If you’re creating video lectures, streaming video clips, or providing narrated presentations, each must either have closed-captions or a transcript. Online standard D10, and the Department of Justice, expects it and your students deserve it. Sites like Universal Subtitles http://www.universalsubtitles.org/ are easy to use and allow your captioned videos to play from their site, or you may download the time codes to upload to YouTube.
  • This is a See Learn presentation about the California eLearning Census.
  • See learn conducted the California elearning census between March and May 2012. The data in the following slides are from 481respondents representing 30% of all districts and direct funded charters.
  • We foundthat 45% of all districts and charters indicated they were using some form of elearning. This data appears to say that we have either passed the tipping point or a point of no return.
  • Of the districts that were NOT using online learning, 32% shared they were currently in the planning stages. When added to our prior group, we may find next year that 63% of all districts are utilizing online or blended learning.
  • the data indicates that much higher percentages of students are enrolled in online and blended learning in the upper levels with the majority at the high school level.
  • Of the four blended learning models, the most popular is the Self Blend, followed by Hybrid Virtual School, a model used by Independent Study schools in california. This seems to indicate that non-consumers, students who are using eLearning to supplement their transcript or schools that provide online courses not offered in the classroom, are a driving force.Census data reflects 31% of districts and direct-funded charters reported they are utilizing more than one blended learning model.Self Blend: 60%Enriched-Virtual: 36%Rotation: 29%Flex: 17%
  • Of the four blended learning models, the most popular is the Self Blend, followed by Hybrid Virtual School, a model used by Independent Study schools in california. This seems to indicate that non-consumers, students who are using eLearning to supplement their transcript or schools that provide online courses not offered in the classroom, are a driving force.Census data reflects 31% of districts and direct-funded charters reported they are utilizing more than one blended learning model.Self Blend: 60%Enriched-Virtual: 36%Rotation: 29%Flex: 17%
  • OER resources, digital materials available for free or a very low cost from sources including Khan Academy and the National Repository of Online Courses (NROC), are helping districts add a digital component without investing in developing or acquiring content. Districts and direct-funded charters also indicated they are utilizing supplemental software/Internet resources or open source materials for online and blended learning in addition to or instead of licensed courses; 14% indicated they utilize two or more OER providers.

Transcript

  • 1. California LearningResource Network (CLRN) http://clrn.org
  • 2. What is CLRN?California Learning Resource Network  http://clrn.org  State-funded Education Technology Service  Established as part of larger ed. Technology legislation in 1999Initial charter: Review supplemental electronic learning resources to CA content standardsExpansion to online courses, OER and data assessment tools
  • 3. What is CLRN?California eLearning Census  http://www.clrn.org/census/eLearning Strategies Symposium  http://elearns.org  @elearns
  • 4. Why CLRN ReviewsCoursesDisrupting Class (2008)Full courses of studyDigital Textbook Initiative (2009/10)Authorization (2010)
  • 5. Review Process: How &WhatLiterature review & initial criteria  SREB, iNACOL, TxVSN, QM, and WA Digital LearningCLRN Stakeholder meetingsCriteria rewrite: CaliforniaCollaboration with TexasCriteria rewrite: national
  • 6. How CLRN ReviewsUtilized existing CLRN review sites  Five physical locations around CA  Subject specific  Established reviewer cohorts (15-25 educators)Three-person review teamsEdited & normed at CLRN Centralhttp://brianbridges.org
  • 7. CLRN Review ProcessDatabase drivenPublishers complete submission onlineAttach standards correlation document  Noting where each standard may be foundBoth teacher and student accounts/passwords are required
  • 8. CLRN Course ReviewProcessEight-step process1. Team assignment2. Content (CCSS) Standards review  Develop, Practice, Assessment3. Minimum Requirements  Reading levels, spelling/grammar, content accuracy, etc.4. Social Content Review  12 areas, including male/female roles, ethnic/cultural groups, & advertising.
  • 9. CLRN Review Process5. Online Standards  Met, Partially Met, or Not Met  Comments for all Partially Met standards  Reviewers utilize CLRN comment sheet6. Features  Course Teacher  Instructional Design  Universal Access  Assessment  Technology  Support Materials
  • 10. CLRN Review Process7. Profile  Publisher Info  Course length and type  Accreditation (UC, NCAA, AP, CLRN-Certified)  Languages, etc8. Abstract  Full course summary  Course objectives and outcomes  Relevant Research
  • 11. CLRN Central ReviewValidation & Norming  Work the courseReview/update all 52 course standardsStandardize review commentsNotes inform reviewer retraining
  • 12. CLRN Central ReviewEditing & Proofreading  Review, modify, and standardize content standards rating & commentsPublisher Feedback  Seven-day window  New evidence required for Re-Review  One Re-Review permitted per course.Publishing  Reviews valid for three years
  • 13. CLRN-CertifiedUniversity of California Partnership A-G Approved CoursesCLRN-Certified  80% content standards  80% online course standards  15 power standards
  • 14. What’s Next?World Language ReviewsMath Common Core StandardsNext Generation Science StandardsAdding Grade 6-8 ReviewsCareer Technical Education StandardsProfessional Development
  • 15. ContentA2. The course content and assignments are aligned with the state’s content standards…  Is the course teaching, providing practice, and assessing each standard?
  • 16. ContentTextVideo (streaming and/or lectures)Simulations / gamesSupplemental commercial resources
  • 17. A Textbook is not a courseIf it were, you could just throw thekid a book and tell them to read it.
  • 18. ContentA3: The course content and assignments are of sufficient rigor, depth and breadth to teach the standards being addressed. *  Develop, Practice, Assess
  • 19. EngagingB3: The course instruction and activities engage students in active learning.*Reading and watching are not active.
  • 20. B3 ConsiderationThe course provides multiple opportunities for students to be actively engaged in the content that includes meaningful and authentic learning experiences such as collaborative learning groups, student‐led review sessions, games, analysis or reactions to videos, discussions, concept mapping, analyzing case studies, etc
  • 21. It’s about PedagogyHow will you engage students?What authentic projects will you use for practice and assessment?How will students collaborate and participate in discussions?
  • 22. Formative AssessmentsShould Inform InstructionB4. The course and course instructor provide students with multiple learning paths, based on student needs that engage students in a variety of ways.*
  • 23. Lower Order ThinkingSkillsB5. The course provides opportunities for students to engage in higher-order thinking, critical reasoning activities and thinking in increasingly complex ways. *
  • 24. B5 Consideration Assignments, activities, and assessments provide opportunities for student to elevate their thinking beyond knowledge and comprehension into the realm of analyzing situations, synthesizing information, or evaluating an argument. Activities should include open‐ended questions, and encourage students to categorize and classify information.
  • 25. Media RichB11. Students have access to resources that enrich the course content.D4. Rich media are provided in multiple formats for ease of use and access in order to address diverse student needs.*
  • 26. AssessmentsC2. The course structure includes adequate and appropriate methods and procedures to assess students’ mastery of content. *
  • 27. C2 ConsiderationC2. Assessment types are matched to the level of knowledge being tested. Both formative assessments (that inform and support learning) and summative assessments (that demonstrate mastery) are a part of the course structure
  • 28. AccessibleD10. Course materials and activities are designed to provide appropriate access to all students. *
  • 29. VarietyC3. Ongoing, varied, and frequent assessments are conducted throughout the course to inform instruction. *
  • 30. Student ProgressC4. Assessment strategies and tools make the student continuously aware of his/her progress in class and mastery of the content. *
  • 31. ProfessionalDevelopmentE7. Course instructors… have been provided professional development in the behavioral, social, and when necessary, emotional, aspects of the learning environment.E8. Course instructors…receive instructor professional development, which includes the support and use of a variety of communication modes to stimulate student engagement online.
  • 32. The Good NewsCLRN Reviews inform course improvement
  • 33. CLRN.ORG
  • 34. CoursesContent Standards: 80%iNACOL Course Standards: 80%  15 Power StandardsCommercial Courses Only
  • 35. AnalysisFirst 114 course reviews31% CLRN-Certified (36 total)  32 courses only missing D10 (28%)Most common problem  Content standards alignment47 courses (41%)< 80% content standards  Range from 29% met to 78% met
  • 36. WILS Page
  • 37. Wils browse
  • 38. California eLearning Census: Trending Past the Tipping Point http://www.clrn.org/census/
  • 39. Who is eLearning?California eLearning CensusMarch 1, 2012 – May 1, 20121634 K-12 districts & direct-funded chartersCurrent results from 481 districts (30%)
  • 40. Who is eLearning? 281 districts 45% & charters
  • 41. Who wants to eLearn? 63% 32%
  • 42. eLearning by GradeGrades K-5 27% Grades 6-8 48%Grades 9-12 83% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%
  • 43. Online and BlendedPopulationActual Count Projected CountVirtual: 19,820 210,000Blended: 86,257 3.4% of the student populationTotal: 106,077
  • 44. Blended Model Breakdown Self-Blend 60%Hybrid-Virtual 36% 31% of districts & charters Rotation use more than one model 29% Flex 17% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%
  • 45. Blended Model Breakdown Self-Blend 60%Enriched-Virtual 36% Rotation 29% Flex 17% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%
  • 46. Self-Built Courses & OER
  • 47. e-LearningStrategiesSymposium
  • 48. eLearning StrategiesSymposium CLRN/CUE partnership December 6-7, 2013 Hilton Orange County/Costa Mesahttp://elearns.orgTwitter: elearns
  • 49. 2012/2013 InitiativesWorld Language SiteCCSS Math Course DescriptionsNext Generation Science StandardsCareer Technical Education (CTE) Model Curriculum Standards.
  • 50. California LearningResource Network (CLRN) http://clrn.org