Sector Literacy Investgations, 2013
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Sector Literacy Investgations, 2013

on

  • 621 views

Sector literacy investigations presentation

Sector literacy investigations presentation

Statistics

Views

Total Views
621
Views on SlideShare
282
Embed Views
339

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

3 Embeds 339

http://www.aea1.k12.ia.us 316
http://clients.siteviz.com 22
http://aea1.k12.ia.us.siteviz.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Estimated time: 1 minuteFacilitator script:This is our goal for today… (pause to allow participants to read)…The understanding is that “on-going” means we will just be beginning these conversations here together. These conversations will continue back in your district. Our deeper investigation is only a step in an on-going process. Unless we collectively develop a deep understanding of these Standards, we will not be able to move ahead with the necessary changes in curriculum, instruction, and assessment that will lead to world-class Iowa schools.Deeper Investigations is not just about us getting smarter about the Iowa Core Standards. It’s about understanding the Standards in such a way that it affects our instruction in a positive way.
  • Estimated time for slides 5–7: 5 minTime so far: 15 minutesFacilitator Script:We will know we have accomplished that learning goal if you meet these success criteria. We will be referring back to these throughout the session so you can gauge your progress.
  • Estimated time: 10 minutesFacilitator script:Read this quote from the Iowa Department of Education Iowa Core website.…Talk at your tables, what do you see as the five most important words in this quote?Facilitator note:May have each table share out its five words.Possible words to highlight for comment—connecting them to our goal of “building our collective understanding of the standards”:Ensure—we are making a promise to students, parents, and our communities based on these standards, so we’d better know what we’re promisingWorld-class—these standards were written so that our students can compete in a world marketAchievement—these standards are results-oriented; the how is determined by Iowa educatorsAll—these standards are for all our students; so how do we understand them in a differentiated classroom? You may also make connections to RtI.Lifelong—these standards are to prepare students for the next phase in their lives; we can’t short-change them whether that next phase is work, college, community service, or the militaryEssential—these do not limit teachers, you can and should teach beyond these standardsContent—the standards are just a piece of the Iowa Core, the WHAT to teacherCritical—the standards have identified what is critical to all students to be prepared for work, military or community service, or further educationExperience—experience speaks of not just being “exposed” to this content, but having meaningful interactions with it
  • BINGO!
  • Estimated time: 30 secondsFacilitator script:This deeper investigation of the standards is a key part of the Iowa Core work we've been engaged in over the past several years.
  • Time for Investigation 1: 5 minTime so far: 10 minutesFacilitator Note: Provide copies of literary and informational samples of reading and writing for each table. You will find these in Appendix B and Appendix C. Choose 11th or 12th grade samples. Each participant should have one sample.Facilitator Script:On your table, you will find a selection of high school level reading and writing passages. These passages are exemplars of what “college or career ready” students should be able to read or write. Choose one to read, and put yourself in the shoes of a high school student. As you study the exemplar, consider the skills necessary to be successful in comprehending or creating the passage.At your table, share some of your insights. You may choose to jot down notes, as they will help you with another activity later in the day.Facilitator Script (IF ASKED):On the writing exemplars you will notice annotations. The purpose of the annotations is to help us understand how the student writing reflects the standards.
  • Estimated time for slides 15–16: 10 minTime so far: 30 minutesFacilitator Note: Allow participants to read through bullet points and table talk. The bullets are set on animation to appear one at a time. You may adjust that if you so choose. Choose 1 hot topic to share out with the groupFacilitator Script: We can no longer afford to have student achievement based on their ZIP codes. Family socio-economic status should not impact student opportunity. Student expectations will be clear and consistent.
  • Estimated time for slides 15–16: 10 minTime so far: 30 minutesFacilitator Script:The Iowa Core standards are good for both teachers and students.Facilitator Note: Allow participants to read through bullet points and table talk.
  • Time so far: 30 minutesFacilitator Note: Remind the participants that the goal for this day is to learn how to effectively navigate the Iowa Core document. Deeper investigations of the standards will occur at a later date.Insert Scavenger Hunt…. Partners will engage in the work, and this will be timed(paper copy)!
  • Estimated time: 3 minutesFacilitator script:So, what do the English Language Arts standards include? You might want to turn to page 2 in your standards document and look at the table of contents.  First come the K-5 ELA standards--including reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Next come the 6-12 ELA standards--including reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language.Next we'll find the 6-12 literacy standards specific to history/social studies, science, and technical subjectsWe'll find additional guidance for understanding all these standards in Appendixes A, B, and C.
  • Estimated time: 3 minutesFacilitator script:Within “Reading” we find our College and Career Readiness anchor standards, standards for both literary and informational text, and standard 10, which speaks to the increased emphasis on the range and complexity of texts students must master. Also, for our K-5 students, there are standards for the foundational reading skills.Within “Writing” we find the standards for the three text types, the writing process, research, and standards that address the range of writing students are expected to accomplish.The “Speaking and Listening” standards include both the skills needed to learn and collaborate, and the skills needed to share knowledge and ideas.Finally, the “Language” standards address the need for the use of conventions and vocabulary development.
  • START HERE????Estimated time: 5 minutesFacilitator script:Let’s look at page 10 in our standards document and just review how the College and Career Readiness pages are set up.First we have the ELA strand identified at the top of the page. This happens to be the reading CCR page.Below this is a short paragraph that describes what the College and Career Readiness standards represent. Take a moment to read this.Below this we find the CCR anchor standards. These are the K-12 goal of our educational process. You can see they are organized into categories, and those categories move from simpler to more complex as we move down the page.Finally, there is a note that provides key background or explanation for understanding the anchor standards.
  • As a learner read the entire set of standards and look for patterns.As a student try not to take a checklist approach. Maintain the integrity of the classroomWith a wide lensed view look at the integration of literature across content, but also think about what’s not included.
  • Handout of Blooms and DOK
  • BINGO!
  • Time for Investigation 2-A: 5 minTime for Investigation 2-B: 15 minTime so far: 1 hour, 26 minutesFacilitator Script:Please remember that the Iowa Core English/Language Arts Standards include separate strands for Reading, Writing, Speaking & Listening, and Language. These Investigations are similar to just getting your “toes wet,” versus a walking out into the ocean up to your knees or waist. These Investigations are set up so you can efficiently navigate the ELA Document with the intent, you’ll continue these conversations back in your building with grade-alike co-workers, with across grade level co-workers, and with your principals. Our second Investigation focuses directly on the College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading. Let’s answer the question: What Information is found on the CCR Anchor Standards page?Facilitator Note: Follow directions for Parts A and B on p. 11 in your Investigations Booklet.Facilitator Script:Notice how reading is not only occurring in English class or reading class. In order to meet the CCR anchor standards, these need to be occurring in ALL content areas, across all disciplines. Please follow the direction for Part A and Part B on p. 11 in your Investigations Booklet. After you complete Part A, please pause for this reflective table discussion question (refer to slide) before beginning Part B of the Investigation.Facilitator Note: After Part B, have a couple volunteers share out.
  • Sarah – Slides 26- 35Estimated time for slides 25–27: 7 minTime so far: 1 hour, 6 minutesFacilitator Script:The first and most expansive ELA standard area is Reading. So let’s begin Investigating.
  • Estimated time for slide 29: 2 minTime so far: 1 hour, 28 minutesFacilitator Script:These CCR Readiness Anchor Standards apply to two different types of text: Literature and Informational Text. As teachers, we will make sure that our students achieve these standards in both types of text. It’s not so important that we can all define the differences right now, but it is important that we, as teachers, understand from the get-go that students will need to be reading from both types of text in ALL content areas...AND to be intentional in their planning. Facilitator Note: If it comes up that people ask about how they are defining Informational or Literature or Literary Text, refer to p. 41 (Standard 10: Range, Quality & Complexity of Student Reading K-5 & 6-12).
  • Time for Investigation 3: 10 minTime so far: 1 hour, 38 minutesFacilitator Script:Now that we’ve discovered there is to be a range of reading that all students need to be doing, and students need access and opportunity to intentional and well-planned levels of complex text.Let’s consider the next Investigation Question: What are the progression of sophistication in reading literature? This Investigation is found on pgs 13-14 of your Investigations Booklet. Directions are found on pg. 13. As you begin this investigation, be sure to notice that there is an example to guide you. As you dig in, you will notice how the standards progress from one category to the next: Key Ideas & Details to Craft and Structure, to Integration of Knowledge & Ideas, then finally Range and Level of Text Complexity. There also is a progression of simple to complex concepts within each category, and also across the different categories. Think about the intentionality of that progression.Facilitator Note: Go through direction on slide.Background Information:Range & Level of Text Complexity does NOT have the same progression K-12. It changes only in K-2. Range & Level of Text Complexity—will explain more in detail coming up in a few more slides.If participants notice/give voice to the fact that the “Iowa-added” standards seem different than the others in so much as there is not a clear progression from grade-level to grade-level, the facilitator could point out that the “Iowa-added” standards are more like the language standards. We continue to develop them throughout our lives. In addition, when viewed in connection with Standard 10, the “Iowa-added” standards with require that students successfully demonstrate the standards in ever-increasing levels of text complexity. IF THIS IS NOT BROUGHT UP BT PARTICIPANTS, we would not recommend that you comment about it at this point in time. 
  • Estimated time for slide 31: 2 minTime so far: 1 hour, 40 minutesTake time to have each participant locate 1 standard for Reading for Literature and investigate their grade level, one prior, and one above!(form a triad and dialogue for example k, 1, and 2 might group together to do this activity) Set a timer- stop look at the next slide and repeat the activity with Informational text!Facilitator Note: Pick one anchor standard and follow it through the grade levels. Note sophistication, complexity across grade levels.Facilitator Script:In an effort to cement this idea of intentional progressions of complexity of text across the Reading Literature Standards, let’s read & think through this slide together.Facilitator Note: Read through the slides pointing out the ideas below: Facilitator Script:Keep in mind: An important component of the Iowa Core is the grade level standards that begin with the simple and progress to the complex. You will see highlighted here Standard 1 in kindergarten, fourth grade, eighth grade, and 11th-12th. This is referenced by the notation following each standard.For example, the R = Reading; L = Literature; K = Kindergarten, 4 = 4th grade, and so on.The number at the end means Standard 1.
  • Estimated time for slide 31: 2 minTime so far: 1 hour, 40 minutesTake time to have each participant locate 1 standard for Reading for Literature and investigate their grade level, one prior, and one above!(form a triad and dialogue for example k, 1, and 2 might group together to do this activity) Set a timer- stop look at the next slide and repeat the activity with Informational text!Facilitator Note: Pick one anchor standard and follow it through the grade levels. Note sophistication, complexity across grade levels.Facilitator Script:In an effort to cement this idea of intentional progressions of complexity of text across the Reading Literature Standards, let’s read & think through this slide together.Facilitator Note: Read through the slides pointing out the ideas below: Facilitator Script:Keep in mind: An important component of the Iowa Core is the grade level standards that begin with the simple and progress to the complex. You will see highlighted here Standard 1 in kindergarten, fourth grade, eighth grade, and 11th-12th. This is referenced by the notation following each standard.For example, the R = Reading; L = Literature; K = Kindergarten, 4 = 4th grade, and so on.The number at the end means Standard 1.
  • BINGO!
  • Bev – Slides 36-42Time for Investigation 5: 20 minTime so far: 2 hours, 25 minutesGive one get one- share another way to do this...Facilitator Script:So we have seen how the standards for reading literature and informational text get more and more complex through the grades. The standards are not the only thing getting more complex. We also need to think about the texts we choose for our students.Go to Appendix A, and open to page 2. Start at the beginning of the page, and continue reading through page 4 and stop when you get to the subheading “The Standards Approach to Text Complexity.” As you read, use the Investigation #5 sheet to jot down at least three insights, or “aha’s” about text selection in your classroom. When we are done reading, we’ll use the “Give One, Get One” strategy to share with other participants.Facilitator Note: Go over Give One, Get One directions from slide. ----- Meeting Notes (8/6/12 14:23) -----Give one, Get one directions are on page 18 of the Investigations booklet
  • Teachingbooks.net- link to the common core text exemplarsEstimated time for slide 42: 5 minTime so far: 5 min (2h 54m)Facilitator Script:So what do these elements look like in real text? There are 3 samples in Appendix A. Let’s look at the first sample. This is an excerpt from a piece on Frederick Douglass. Notice that is has been designated as a “6th-8th Text Complexity Band.” Then, if we look on page 12, we can read through the qualitative, quantitative, and reader task considerations.Facilitator Note: After giving participants a chance to read through the considerations, they will have a better understanding of how they have been applied. This is a “basic awareness-level” piece of information. There are two additional samples that you may or may not choose to spend time on, depending on needs of the people in the room.Facilitator Script:You can find additional samples of text in Appendix B. Let’s take a look at Appendix B now. Facilitator Note:Go over table of contents and allow time for them to peruse this Appendix. You may direct them to Appendix B, page 3, “How to Read This Document.”Facilitator Script:(Highlight again) These exemplars were chosen based on the three elements for text complexity: qualitative, quantitative and matching the reader to task. Please note, these exemplars are not a required reading list. You may find texts that meet the same levels of complexity from various genre, cultures, and time periods. We need to emphasize this again and again.
  • Time for Investigation 6: 12 minTime so far: 2 hours, 46 minutesFacilitator Note: Go through the directions on the slide. After the activity, point out several features:Reference in the CCSS to the Lexile Framework in pages 7-8.New Lexile ranges on page 8.More information is included from http://lexile.com/.
  • Shirley – Slides 43- 45Estimated time for slide 43: 2 minTime so far: 7 min (2h 56m)Facilitator Script:We looked at reading standards for both literature and informational text. There is another short set of standards for K-5 students.Please turn in your standards to page 19.These are the Foundational Skills. Facilitator Note: Go over information on slide.
  • Estimated time for slide 45: 5 minTime so far: 20 min (3h 9m)Facilitator Script:When we talk about reading standards, we need to distinguish between constrained and unconstrained skills.Most of the foundational skills are constrained skills. Either students have them or they don’t. They can be taught and assessed, and once students have them, they do not need additional instruction. Examples of these are phonics or letter recognition.However, most comprehension skills are unconstrained. We are all continually working on improving our comprehension. The foundational skill of fluency is an unconstrained skill. This is a skill that can be developed at greater levels throughout the grades.Facilitator Note: Point out the quote on the slide from page 19.Facilitator Script:Let’s look back at Appendix A, page 17. On pages 17-22 there is very specific detail on the foundational skills.
  • Time for Investigation 7: 8 minTime so far: 15 min (3h 4m)Facilitator Note: Go over the directions on the slide/participation guide page.
  • Bev – Slides 46-54Estimated time for slides 46–49: 5 minTime so far: 25 min (3h 14m)Facilitator Script:You’ll notice as we continue around the ELA circle, a great deal of time has been spent in the area of Reading. As we move into the other content areas we will move a little more quickly since this is an overview of structure and the structure is fairly similar throughout.We will now look at writing. We will touch on the structure, some of the content and resources within the Iowa Core that will support writing.
  • Estimated time for slides 46–49: 5 minTime so far: 25 min (3h 14m)Facilitator Script:Writing has its own College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards and categories. These are:Text Types & PurposesProduction & Distribution of WritingResearch to Build & Present KnowledgeRange of WritingThese CCR standards and categories are continual through all the grade levels and disciplines.
  • Time for Investigation 8: 10 minTime so far: 35 min (3h 24m)Facilitator Script:For this Investigation, you will read through the CCR standards and think about the major concepts, or ideas of each of these categories. Please put your thinking in the first column on your Investigation form.After reading and taking notes on the CCR standards please move on to Part B. Read the “Note on range & content of student writing.” Discuss and take notes in the chart.We will spend 10 minutes to learn about these standards.Share out.Facilitator Note: Have a couple volunteers share out. What are some new learnings, thoughts, ideas, etc.
  • Discussion Questions for Part B:What makes these samples exemplars?How do the annotations help you as an educator?How do the exemplars help you think about expectations for your own students' writings?Time for Investigation 9: 20 minTime so far: 55 min (3h 44m)Facilitator Note: You will probably want to do Part A first and give participants time to process and share out new learnings. Then build on this by moving to Part B.Facilitator Script:For our first investigation, some of you had the opportunity to look at a student writing sample from Appendix C. We’re going to now take a closer look at these and the three text types addressed in the standards.First we will take the opportunity to understand what the three text types are and how they are defined by the core standards.You will find the definitions for argument, informational/explanatory, and narrative in Appendix A on pages 23-24. Once you locate these definitions you will read through those highlighting any aha’s or major ideas. and make notes on your chart.Facilitator Note: Share out about text types before moving on.Facilitator Script:After you have an understanding of these text types you will go to Appendix C.Here you will find student writing samples for K-12. You will locate the three text types samples for your grade level. Some grade levels do not have a sample for each text type. If a text type is missing for your grade level, look at the grade below or above to find that sample.When you are looking at the samples think about these questions:What makes these samples exemplars?How do the annotations help you as an educator?How do the exemplars help you think about expectations for your own students’ writings?Please go ahead and begin your investigation. You will have about 20 minutes.
  • Estimated time: 3 minutesFacilitator script:So, what do the English Language Arts standards include? You might want to turn to page 2 in your standards document and look at the table of contents.  First come the K-5 ELA standards--including reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Next come the 6-12 ELA standards--including reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language.Next we'll find the 6-12 literacy standards specific to history/social studies, science, and technical subjectsWe'll find additional guidance for understanding all these standards in Appendixes A, B, and C.
  • Estimated time for slides 54–55: 2 minTime so far: 1 hour (3h 49 m)Facilitator Script:Here are the Speaking and Listening Standards’ categories. Think briefly about what these might mean and how these connect to the idea of having students college and career ready....Turn to a table partner and share your thinking.What were some ideas you had or you heard at your table?Facilitator Note: Have a few tables share out. Expand on any ideas if need be. Facilitator Script:Let’s now take some time to look further into the specific standards and how they correlate with our current thoughts and connections.
  • Time for Investigation 10-A: 10 minTime so far: 1 hour, 10 min (3h 59 m)Facilitator Script:We have been thinking and discussing how these standards impact, or can impact, our current work with students. To consolidate your thinking we are going to do an activity called a quick write. You can either write in the box on your investigation sheet or on a separate sheet of paper.We are writing about the implications for you and your students. You will have one minute to write and then we will get up and find someone to read the quick write to. You will then have one more minute to add to your writing. So have your writing materials ready and you may begin writing now.Facilitator Note: After first writing, follow the sequence mentioned above (and on the slide) to complete the activity.Consider:Questions for Part A:How could these CCR Standards and categories potentially change current classroom speaking and listening practices?(K-5 pg.28 6-12 pg.62 ELA Standards Booklet)How have technologies changed speaking & listening?
  • Estimated time: 3 minutesFacilitator script:So, what do the English Language Arts standards include? You might want to turn to page 2 in your standards document and look at the table of contents.  First come the K-5 ELA standards--including reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Next come the 6-12 ELA standards--including reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language.Next we'll find the 6-12 literacy standards specific to history/social studies, science, and technical subjectsWe'll find additional guidance for understanding all these standards in Appendixes A, B, and C.
  • Bev – Slides 61-68Estimated time for slides 59–60: 2 minTime so far: 1 hour, 20 min (4h 9 m)Facilitator Note: The purpose of this slide is to help participants recognize that the Language strand, like every set of ELA standards is grouped into categories, and that those categories are exactly the same as the categories found in the CCR anchor standards.Facilitator Script:As we start to investigate the Language Standards, you will be pleased to notice that the standards are grouped into categories, just as standards are grouped in all of the other ELA strands as well. You will notice that the categories are the same for every grade level, and that we can back-map them to the categories found in our CCR anchor standards. Perhaps we can think about the category titles as the “big ideas” of what our students need to understand about language and be able to do with it.First Bullet: Our students need to understand and apply the essential “rules” of standard spoken and written English. That will be the focus of the first category of standards.Second Bullet: The next category of standards will help us approach language instruction as a matter of craft and informed choice among alternatives when speaking and writing.Third Bullet: The clustered vocabulary standards focus on understanding words and phrases, their relationships, and their nuances and on acquiring new vocabulary, particularly general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.Estimated time for slide 61: 5 minTime so far: 1 hour, 25 min (4h 14 m)Facilitator Note: The purpose of this slide is to build participants’ awareness the Appendices are vital source documents for understanding and unpacking the Iowa Core, AND to reinforce the conceptual understanding that the ELA standard strands should never be taught in isolation of one another. Not only would that be a bad idea, it would be impossible to “cover” each standard separately. All strands of the ELA Standards are interconnected and must be presented as such during instruction. Facilitator Script:“The inclusion of Language standards in their own strand should not be taken as an indication that the Language Standards should be taught separately, or that skills related to conventions, knowledge of language, and vocabulary are unimportant to reading, writing, speaking, and listening; indeed, they are inseparable from such contexts.” CCSS Appendix A, page 28Appendix A will help bring that idea home to teachers. Appendix A will be a vital reference document for teachers. It provides necessary background information that is essential for understanding and unpacking the ELA standards. The section of Appendix A that specifically supports the Language Standards begins on page 28.Please sticky note Appendix A, and/or page 28, if you would like to investigate this resource at a later date.Facilitator Note: Pause briefly to let them do so.
  • Time for Investigation 11: 17 minTime so far: 1 hour, 42 min (4h 31 m)Facilitator Note: These are the directions for Investigation #11, which are also found on the Investigation Sheet itself. Facilitator Script:Please turn to Investigation #11 in your booklet.Facilitator Note: Pause for participants to get there.Facilitator Script:As we begin our Investigation of the Language Standards, we would ask that you first draw your attention to the italicized paragraphs on the right-hand side of p. 33 or p. 68, depending on your grade level. These paragraphs describe what language instruction will look like for graduates who can achieve our Language Standards and put them into play in authentic and rigorous real-world contexts. The first bullet on this slide and on your Investigation # 11 sheet will ask you to read and interpret these paragraphs. The bullets that follow will provide direction for the next steps of Investigating the Language Standards. Let’s take about 15 minutes to complete this Investigation.
  • Time for Investigation 12: 17 minTime so far: 1 hour, 59 min (4h 48 m)Facilitator Note: The purpose of this slide is to draw participants’ attention to the chart that follows the Language Standards section of the document. Of particular importance in this document is the explanation of the asterisk that is provided above the chart. Teachers will need time to digest and interpret how that chart might help them to understand the spiraling nature of language instruction.This Investigation goes deeper than others into these overview investigations. Therefore, you might want to take time into consideration when deciding whether to engage participants in this Investigation. We’re going to look a little further at these standards because there is something different you might have noticed in the Language Standards - some of them are marked with an asterisk. We’ll need to figure out what that means!Please turn to p. 40 or p. 72 in your Standards document. You will find a Chart that is titled “Language Progressive Skills.”Investigation # 12 is going to ask you to cross-reference this chart with your grade-level standards. To complete this activity, you will be flipping back and forth between your standards and this chart.Please turn to Investigation #12 in your guide and follow the directions to learn more about the special nature of some of the grade-level language standards.
  • Time so far: 2 hours, 2 min (4h 51 m)Facilitator Note: Refer back to the activity earlier in the day, reading the passages at your table and brainstorming what a student needs in order to read these successfully. Ask participants to talk at their table about findings.After table talk, discuss:What in your thinking has been validated?What has changed in your thinking?

Sector Literacy Investgations, 2013 Sector Literacy Investgations, 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • Sector Literacy Investigations Fall 2013 S
  • Learning Goal Our goal as professional educators is to engage in deep and on-going conversations that build our collective understanding of the Iowa Core Standards… …in order to make instructional decisions.
  • Success Criteria • I can confidently navigate the Iowa Core English Language Arts Standards document • I can explain the structure of the English/Language Arts section to a colleague • I can explain how grade level standards contribute to the College and Career Readiness of students. • I can consider implications for teaching and student learning
  • What are the Iowa Core Standards? “The vision for the Iowa Core is to ensure the success of each and every student by providing a world-class curriculum. The Iowa Core is designed to improve achievement of all students, preparing them for the world of work and lifelong learning. It identifies the essential content and instruction of critical content areas that all students must experience.” —Iowa Department of Education website, 2011
  • Common Core At 30,000 Feet
  • What skills do students need to be able to read and write successfully? Investigation #1 Choose and read one of the student reading or writing passages (p. 144 appendix B) or (p. 70 appendix C).
  • Surprising Statistics 2008-2009: 1.5 million students in remediation % of students not prepared for college level work: • 33% reading • 47% social science • 58% algebra • 72% biology Only 23% of college students do not
  • A college and career ready student should be able to… 1. Demonstrate independence. 1. Builds strong content knowledge. 1. Responds to the varying demands of audience,
  • 4. Comprehends as well as critiques 5. Values evidence 6. Uses technology and digital media strategically and capably 7. Comes to understand other perspectives and
  • Why are ELA standards good for teachers? • They provide student learning standards for every grade level • They ensure a common language for educators • They provide a strong and common basis for assessment
  • Navigating the document p. 2-3 of the participant book Scavenger Hunt
  • Overall ELA Structure Readin g K-5 6-12 ELA 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science & Technical Subjects Language ELA Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Speaking & Listening Writing
  • ELA Standards Elements Informational Text Standards Reading Foundational Skills Reading Standard 10 Range & Text Complexity Language Standards •Conventions of Standard English •Knowledge of Language •Vocabulary Acquisition & Use Languag e Listening & Speaking Standards •Comprehension & Collaboration •Presentation of Knowledge & Ideas ELA Speaking & Listening Writing Writing Standards •Text Types & Purposes •Production & Distribution of Writing •Research to Build and Present Knowledge •Range of Writing
  • CCR Description ELA Strand CCR Standards CCR CCR Categories Standards Standards Note
  • Key design features Key ideas in each area: • College and Career Readiness (CCR) & Grade specific standards • Grade Levels and Grade Bands • Focus on Results rather than Means • Integrated Model of Literacy • Research and Media Blended • Shared Responsibility
  • Let’s look at the core… As a Learner As a Student Wide lens view
  • As a learner with your group Read the Standards linearly Read the Standards vertically following one grade band Discuss your findings. Observations?
  • As a learner with your group Read the Standards linearly Read the Standards vertically following one grade band Discuss with your findings. Observations? Patterns?
  • As a Student What kind of instruction would I need to have in order to meet these standards? What am I doing in my classroom that aligns? What are some things I may need to adjust or change? What potential impact will this have in my classroom?
  • Wide Lense View
  • 21st Century Learner
  • Depth of Knowledge
  • Investigation #2 What do the categories help you understand about what students will be required to do as readers? p. 4 of your packet
  • Reading ELA
  • Standards in Reading Literature Informational Text
  • Investigation #3 What are the progressions of sophistication in reading literature? p. 5-6 of your packet
  • Reading Literature Spiral With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. (RL.K.1) Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1.) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. (RL.11-12.1.)
  • Reading for Informational Text Spiral With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. (RI.K.1) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (RI.4.1) Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RI.8-1) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. (RI.11-12.1.)
  • Three key changes highlighted within the ELA CCSS: 1. Building knowledge though content rich non-fiction. 2. Reading, writing, and speaking from evidence grounded in literary and informational texts. 3. Regular practice with complex texts and its academic language.
  • Emphasis on non-fiction… The CCSS emphasizes a 50:50 balance of informational texts and literary texts at the elementary level and 70:30 at the secondary level.
  • Introducing Text Complexity
  • Why do we need to be concerned with text complexity? Investigation #5 p. 8 of your packet
  • Choosing Appropriate Texts • Please turn to Appendix A, p. 11-16, and look at the samples. • Factors for text selection: complexity, quality and range • The text exemplars provided on the CCSS list in Appendix B are … –Examples only –Not required reading
  • What are the 3 elements of text complexity Investigation #6 p. 9 of your packet
  • Click on Common Core, choose a grade level Username: kaea202 Password: kaea01
  • Foundational Skills (K-5) Concepts of print Alphabeti c principle Phonics & word recognition Fluency
  • Foundational Skills (K-5) “The point is to teach students what they need to learn and not what they already know-to discern when particular children or activities warrant more or less attention.” (Iowa Core, K-5 Reading Foundational Skills, p. 19)
  • How do the foundational reading skills fit in? Investigation #7 p. 10 of your packet
  • ELA Writing
  • CCR Anchor Standards for Writing Categories • Text Types & Purposes • Production & Distribution of Writing • Research to Build & Present Knowledge • Range of Writing
  • What do you learn from the CCR pages for writing? Investigation #8 p. 11 of your packet
  • How do the standards address text types? Investigation #9 p. 12 of your packet
  • ELA Speaking & Listening
  • Speaking and Listening Standards Comprehension and Collaboration Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
  • Investigation #10 How do speaking and listening standards impact classroom practices? p. 13 of your packet
  • Language ELA
  • Standards for Language • Conventions of Standard English • Knowledge of Language • Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
  • Investigation #11 What big ideas do I notice about the language standards? p. 14 of your packet
  • Investigation #12 What’s this “Language Progressive” all about? p. 15 of your packet
  • What does College and Career Readiness mean? Readin g Language ELA Speaking & Listening Writing