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Product Management

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I. Define product management. ...

I. Define product management.
II. Discuss the constituents of a product.
i.Examine the significance product elements.
III. Evaluate the role of product packaging in consumers’ buying decisions.
IV. Evaluate four product-growth decisions.
V. Use techniques for product management.

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    Product Management Product Management Presentation Transcript

    • PRODUCTMANAGEMENT
    • Learning ObjectivesI. Define product management.II. Discuss the constituents of a product. i. Examine the significance product elements.III. Evaluate the role of product packaging in consumers’ buying decisions.IV. Evaluate four product-growth decisions.V. Use techniques for product management. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 2
    • Learning ObjectivesI. Define product management.II. Discuss the constituents of a product. i. Examine the significance product elements.III. Evaluate the role of product packaging in consumers’ buying decisions.IV. Evaluate four product-growth decisions.V. Use techniques for product management. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 3
    • Product management© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 4
    • It’s theprocess ofsatisfying consumers’ needs and fosteringa firm’s performance through effective product-development and product-marketing .© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 5
    • It’s the process of managinga product successfully throughout the various stages of its lifecycle. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 6
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 7
    • Learning ObjectivesI. Define product management.II. Discuss the constituents of a product. i. Examine the significance product elements.III. Evaluate the role of product packaging in consumers’ buying decisions.IV. Evaluate four product-growth decisions.V. Use techniques for product management. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 8
    • What is a product comprised of?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 9
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 10
    • What are theelements or parts of this pack of cereals?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 11
    • Organisation Actual Product After SalesAugmented Product Service Price Packaging Product Brand Finance Advice Values Design Features Delivery Warranties Basic Product Augmented product Corporate Image© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 12
    • Product anatomy is a breakdown of a product into constituent units.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 13
    • Learning ObjectivesI. Define product management.II. Discuss the constituents of a product. i. Examine the significance product elements.III. Evaluate the role of product packaging in consumers’ buying decisions.IV. Evaluate four product-growth decisions.V. Use techniques for product management. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 14
    • What are the implications of the product anatomy to product management?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 15
    • 1 A product is more than its physical form or content. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 16
    • narrow A reason for product failures is…managers have interpretation of product.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 17
    • 2 It is the interaction of product elements that provide value to customers. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 18
    • Failure to integrate the various product elements successfully is a reason for product failure.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 19
    • 3 Managing a product successfully demands a mix of knowledge… © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 20
    • Product management Ecology Engineering Gastronomy Economics Anthropology Human resource management Informationtechnology Operations management Graphics design Finance Etc.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 21
    • Learning ObjectivesI. Define product management.II. Discuss the constituents of a product. i. Examine the significance product elements.III. Evaluate the role of product packaging in consumers’ buying decisions.IV. Evaluate four product-growth decisions.V. Use techniques for product management. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 22
    • PRODUCT P CK GING© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 23
    • The outward tangible elements of a product.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 24
    • Colours Size Shape Weight Pictures Labels Materials© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 25
    • Is it worth spending millions of pounds on product packaging?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 26
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 27
    • 1 Portability Convenient to carry, transport & consume. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 28
    • 2Preservation High-tech packagesare extending the shelf- life of products. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 29
    • 3 It conveys critical product information to buyers. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 30
    • Lack of information tomake informed and educated choices, is perceived asrisky by buyers.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 31
    • Perceived Risk Psychological Risk Functional Risk Financial Risk Physical Risk Social Risk Time Source: adapted from Kotler (2012)© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 32
    • Putting a message on packagingcosts significantly less than newspaper, TV, or Internet advertising. Tetra Pak (2012), “Tetra Pak Magazine No 96 - Package Communication”. Retrieved Feb. 27, 2012, from www.tetrapak.com/Document%20Bank/TetraPak_Magazine/TP_Magazine%20Nr98_EN.pdf© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 33
    • 4 Visual elements of actual product. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 34
    • Glossy packaging gives a luxurious orpremium impression of the product. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 35
    • Visual differentiation frequently drives purchase decisions. Tetra Pak (2012), “There’s No Second Chance to Make a First Impression”. Retrieved Feb. 27, 2012, from http://www.tetrapak.com/about_tetra_pak/cases/Pages/First_Impression.aspx© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 36
    • Visually appealingpackaging can provoke impulse buying.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 37
    • Studies show impulse shoppers respond highly to packaging visuals.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 38
    • of all purchasing decisionsare made inside the store,you realise how important is product appearance.Tetra Pak (2012), “Tetra Pak Magazine No 98 - Consumer Trends”. Retrieved Feb. 27, 2012, from www.tetrapak.com/Document%20Bank/TetraPak_Magazine/TP_magazine96_EN.pdf © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 39
    • 5 Safety © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 40
    • Consumers want to be confident thatthe [package] is safe and protects thecontents, but they also want to know if it is environmentally sustainable. Tetra Pak (2012), “Tetra Pak Magazine No 98 - Consumer Trends”. Retrieved Feb. 27, 2012, from www.tetrapak.com/Document%20Bank/TetraPak_Magazine/TP_Magazine%20Nr98_EN.pdf © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 41
    • 6 Packaging serves to differentiate a product from rival products. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 42
    • Classic coke’s curvy, “stripes”,etc. are instantlyrecognisable byfans, worldwide.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 43
    • Packaging gives personality to classic coke, & identifies its maker, Coca-Cola.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 44
    • 7 It could serve as a salespromotional tool. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 45
    • Multipack meanslower unit cost, cost-savings to customers.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 46
    • 8 To flaunt a firm’s green credentials. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 47
    • Coca-Cola’s PlantBottle© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 48
    • Anatomy of Product PackagingTetra Pak (2012), “Tetra Pak Magazine No 96 - Package Communication”. Retrieved Feb. 27, 2012, from www.tetrapak.com/Document%20Bank/TetraPak_Magazine/TP_Magazine%20Nr98_EN.pdf © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 49
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 50
    • 1 It increases the cost &, consequently price of product. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 51
    • 2 Deceitful packaging © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 52
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 53
    • 3 Using excess packaging. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 54
    • Learning ObjectivesI. Define product management.II. Discuss the constituents of a product. i. Examine the significance product elements.III. Evaluate the role of product packaging in consumers’ buying decisions.IV. Evaluate four product-growth decisions.V. Use techniques for product management. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 55
    • PRODUCT DECISIONS© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 56
    • The main goal ofproduct management is to grow product sales profitably. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 57
    • can this be achieved© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 58
    • Ansoff-Growth Matrix Current Market New Market Market Current Penetration Extension Product Product New Diversification Development© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 59
    • Current Market New Market Market Current Penetration Extension Product Product New Diversification Development© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 60
    • Growth within a firm’s existing territorial or “segmentorial” market.(demographic, psychographic, and behavioural consumer segments.) © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 61
    • Desirable State Gap to close Market Share Current State Time The underlying goal of "market penetration" is to increase sales and market share.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 62
    • 30 minutes Unsatisfied with its sales and profit performance for 2012, Morrisons supermarket is embarking on market penetration. In what ways can the company penetrate the UK grocery market? © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 63
    • 1 Provide valued-products. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 64
    • 2 Picture source: wikimedia.org Expand retail presence (no. of stores). © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 65
    • 3 Provide an online-to-home delivery service. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 66
    • 4 Price-promotion © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 67
    • 5 Build brand equity. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 68
    • 6 Provide superior customer service experiences . © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 69
    • 30 minutes What are the chances of success? © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 70
    • Growth by market penetration thrives under certain conditions like…© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 71
    • 1 Firm’s operating market is underpenetrated. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 72
    • 2 If the firm can reduce the market share of rivals without destroying its profit margins. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 73
    • Current Market New Market Market Current Penetration Extension Product Product New Diversification Development© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 74
    • The firm targets a new territorial or “segmentorial”market with an existing offering. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 75
    • Geographic market extension An existing product orservice is madeavailable in new markets. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 76
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 77
    • Usually the offering is adapted to fit buyer’s preferences.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 78
    • Tesco’s US outfit© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 79
    • Tesco’s UK outfit© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 80
    • Market extension can be pursued by acquiring other firms.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 81
    • Such as ASDA’s 2011 acquisition of NETTO© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 82
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 83
    • Gender market extension From Dovewomen to Dove men.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 84
    • Age-based market extension An existing product orservice is made available to a consumer segment of a certain age group.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 85
    • Originalmarket:18-35age-group Product Extendedmarket:40-65age-group Service© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 86
    • Income-based market extension An existing product orservice is made available to a consumer segment of a certain income threshold.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 87
    • Originalmarket:£70.000.00plusincome Extendedmarket:£18.000.00plus© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 88
    • What are the pushfactors for market extension, and probability for success?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 89
    • 1 Firm’s operating market is saturated. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 90
    • 2 There’s a strong fitbetween the existing offering and the extended market. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 91
    • 3 If a firm’s existing capabilities can adequately serve the new market. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 92
    • What are the challenges of growth by market extension?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 93
    • …and how those challenges can be overcome?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 94
    • Current Market New Market Market Current Penetration Extension Product Product New Diversification Development© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 95
    • The firm grows within its existing territorial or“segmentorial” market by providing new products or services.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 96
    • Samsung’s 2012 revenue growth was strong thanks to a string of new mobile devices targeting low-end, mid and high-end mobile users.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 97
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 98
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 99
    • Some of Coca-Cola’s products are acquired businesses.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 100
    • 30 minutes The justification for growth through new product development. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 101
    • 1 To ignite revenue growthespecially if the firm operates in mature industries. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 102
    • Apple’s iPod line from 2001-2012© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 103
    • 2 …to appeal to various buyers’ needs in an existing market. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 104
    • 3 Innovate or die! If not you will be outran by the competition. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 105
    • Current Market New Market Market Current Penetration Extension Product Product New Diversification Development© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 106
    • The firm moves into new product categories or industries.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 107
    • Not too long ago,the iPod was a bigrevenue generator for Apple, but not any more.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 108
    • In 2007, Apple entered the mobile phone industry.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 109
    • The iPhone accounts for 44% of Apple’s revenue in 2011.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 110
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 111
    • Related Diversification The firm grows by expandinginto product or service categories that are related to its core business. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 112
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 113
    • A high degree of relationships exit among Apple’s product categories.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 114
    • 1 A high degree of relationships exit among HP’s product categories. 2 3 4 5© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 115
    • 2010: HP acquired Palm to enter the fast growing tablet computing space.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 116
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 117
    • Related Diversification The firm grows by expandinginto product or service categories that are unrelated to its core business. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 118
    • 1987; the merger between Moet Hennessy and Louis Vuitton.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 119
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 120
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 121
    • In August2011, Google acquired MotorolaMobility. Is the acquisition a related or unrelated diversification?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 122
    • 30 minutes Virgin Group has diversified into related and unrelated industries. Does diversification benefit the company? How? © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 123
    • 1 It enables the company to pursue growth in multiple territorial, “segmentorial” & product markets. (demographic, psychographic, and behavioural consumer segments.) © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 124
    • 2 By moving resources & core competencies into new industries, the firm can use its capabilities efficiently. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 125
    • The efficiency of a factory is improved by producing two or more product categories compared if multiple production platforms are used.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 126
    • synergy When two firms combine; they can share & use the same capabilities. Thereby, reducing costs.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 127
    • Before the 2008 global financial crisis, GE finance accounted for 50% of GE’s profit & funded the operations of GE’s businesses like Energy.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 128
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 129
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 130
    • Possible areas of synergistic gains. Administration HR Technology Marketing Distribution R&D Manufacturing© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 131
    • 3 Risks Spreading Are single-product firms more at risk than multi-product firms? © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 132
    • 4 Shareholders’ wealth may improve as a direct result of reinvesting cash in new businesses. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 133
    • 20 minutes Growth through Diversification Challenges© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 134
    • 1 It requires a strongmanagement system to keep tap of multiple businesses. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 135
    • 2 The risk of cross contamination is always there. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 136
    • News of the World, a UK-basednewspaper outfit of News Corp., was shutdown amid a phone hacking scandal in 2011.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 137
    • News Corp pulls out of BSkyB bid Source: The Guardian (2011). Retrieved from www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/13/news-corp-pulls-out-of-bskyb-bid© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 138
    • News Corp pulls out of BSkyB bid Source: The Guardian (2011). Retrieved from www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/13/news-corp-pulls-out-of-bskyb-bid© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 139
    • 3 Diversification has in many cases devalued shareholders’ wealth. The new diversified business, especially if it turns out to be successful, dilutes or lowers the value of investors’ shareholding. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 140
    • Learning ObjectivesI. Define product management.II. Discuss the constituents of a product. i. Examine the significance product elements.III. Evaluate the role of product packaging in consumers’ buying decisions.IV. Evaluate four product-growth decisions.V. Use techniques for product management. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 141
    • Product Management TOOLS© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 142
    • Product life-cycle BCG Matrix GE-McKinsey Matrix Cost-Benefit Analysis Discounted Cash Flow Analysis Payback Period analysis Breakeven Analysis Etc.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 143
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 144
    • Raymond Vernon– Product Life-cycle, (1966) Economist, Professor 1914-1999© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 145
    • Philip Kotler & Gary Armstrong (2009) Principles of Marketing, 13Ed.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 146
    • As a product manager, what actions would you take tominimise the cost and maximise the sales of a product through out its lifecycle?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved.
    • Which element ormix of elements Productwould you use to Planet Price manage theproduct along its life-cycle? Process Marketing Mix Place Physical Promotion Layout People© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 148
    • Pre-introduction Stage© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved.
    • Introduction Stage© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved.
    • iPad 3 launch, March 7 2012© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved.
    • Product Planet Price Process Marketing Mix Place Physical Promotion Layout People© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 152
    • Product Plan Price Marketing Process Place Mix Physical Promotion Layout People© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 153
    • Growth Stage© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved.
    • Tablet devices© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 155
    • Product Planet Price Marketing Process Place Mix Physical Promotion Layout People© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 156
    • Maturity Stage© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved.
    • Product Planet Price Marketing Process Place Mix Physical Promotion Layout People© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 158
    • Product Planet Price Marketing Process Place Mix Physical Promotion Layout People© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 159
    • Product Planet Price Marketing Process Place Mix Physical Promotion Layout People© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 160
    • iPad 3 launch© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved.
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 162
    • Decline Stage© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved.
    • Product Planet Price Marketing Process Place Mix Physical Promotion Layout People© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 164
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved.
    • Product Planet Price Marketing Process Place Mix Physical Promotion Layout People© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 166
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 167
    • Product Life-Cycle Has it got limitations?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 168
    • 1 Can you locate the precisestage of the product on its life-cycle? Introduction Growth Maturity Decline 0 Low rivalry Increasing Stronger rivalry Extreme rivalry Rivalry © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 169
    • Difficult to determine an accurate position of a product on the curve.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 170
    • 2 Do all products actually gothrough such a neat, tidy curve? Introduction Growth Maturity Decline 0 Low rivalry Increasing Stronger rivalry Extreme rivalry Rivalry © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 171
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 172
    • A fall in sales doesn’t necessarily mean the product or industryhas reached maturity or decline. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 173
    • 3 Do all products “die-out”? © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 174
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 175
    • …developed by Bruce Henderson in 1968.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 176
    • Also known as…Portfolio Analysis Tool.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 177
    • The BCG Matrix is a… …tool used for deciding how to allocate resources to a group of products.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 178
    • Product Portfolio The total range of products owned by a firm.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 179
    • Product Mix Variety of products owned by a firm.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 180
    • Product Line A group of products sharing a common parental name or common characteristics.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 181
    • Homecare Skincare Food&Beverages It’s the start of a new financial year. Your job as CFO is to allocate specificfunding for each of the three businesses owned by Unilever. Assuming you have a total budget of £10m. Allocate the funding & justify your decision.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 182
    • How much funding should we allocate to homecare, skincare and food & beverages?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 183
    • …it depends on the market share of each business, and its market growth rate.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 184
    • What is market share? Why is it an important indicator?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 185
    • 120 UK Mobile Phones Market Volume : million units, 2008–2012 Market demand (million units) 100 80 60 40 20 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 What is market growth rate? Why is it an important indicator?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 186
    • Is the growth rate rising, falling or stagnant?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 187
    • The sweetest spot for any business is to… “…achieve the maximummarket share that generates themost cash with minimal costs.”© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 188
    • MarketShareMarketGrowthRate © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 189
    • MarketShare High Low HighMarketGrowthRate Low © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 190
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 191
    • The results from the BCG Matrix analysis… …can reveal possible strategies to adopt for a given product or business.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 192
    • What actions would you adopt for a star product?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 193
    • Star Business: Strategic Options Grow market share leadership. Penetrate market withexisting product. Innovateexisting product. BoostR&D expenditure. Allocatethe best resources.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 194
    • What actions would you adopt for a cash-cow product?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 195
    • Cash-cow Business: Strategic Options Defend market share leadership. Penetrate market withexisting product. Acquire rival firms. Innovateexisting product. Reduce R&D expenditure. Seek operational efficiency.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 196
    • What actions would you adopt for a question-mark product?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 197
    • Question-mark Business: Strategic Options Grow market share. Acquire rival firms. Innovateexisting product. PrudentlyboostR&D expenditure. Prudentlyallocate thebest resources.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 198
    • What actions would you adopt for a dog product?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 199
    • Dog Business: Strategic Options Sell the business. Kil the business. Prudentlyinnovateexisting product. Cost-cutting.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 200
    • Homecare Skincare Food&Beverages As CFO, you have allocated funding for each business basedon market share and market growthrate. Is that a valid decision? Explain.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 201
    • False assumption of equating market-share to profitability.1 © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 202
    • False assumption of2 equating market-growth to industry attractiveness. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 203
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 204
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 205
    • Our focus is on the… GE Matrix.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 206
    • The GE Matrix analysis… …reveals what strategy a business should adopt by analysing its strengths and industry attractiveness.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 207
    • IndustryAttractiveness CompetitiveStrengthofBusiness© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 208
    • Industry Attractiveness PESTEL Forces. Porter’s Five Forces. Market growth rate. Market Size. Etc.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 209
    • Competitive Strength of Business Market share. Resources. Finance. Talents. Knowledge. Strategic alliances. Brand | reputation. Culture. R&D. Etc.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 210
    • High Invest | Grow IndustryAttractiveness Medium Hold Harvest| Divest Low High Medium Low CompetitiveStrengthofBusiness© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 211
    • Mooradian, Matzler & Ring (2012), “Strategic Marketing”. 1st Ed., Pearsoned© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 212
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 213
    • A thorough examination of the financial and non-financialcosts and benefits of a proposedinvestment in a product project. © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 214
    • …however, cost-benefitanalysis is an imperfect tool. Why?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 215
    • The amount of time (in weeks, years or months) it takes for a business to make back the money it spends on a specific investment.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 216
    • Source: Johnson, J., Scholes, K. & Whittington, R. (2007) “Exploring Corporate Strategy”, 8 ed.© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 217
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 218
    • It’s the NPV of the future cash flows generated by a proposed investment. NPV:NetPresentValue© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 219
    • Cash Cash Net Cash −2 million Inflows (£) Outflows (£) Flows (£) 2011 2 million 2012 7 million 4.5 million 2.5 million 2013 10 million 6 million 4 million 2014 15 million 9.5 million 5.5 million 2015 18 million 10 million 8 million 2016 20 million 10 million 10 million 2017 25 million 12 million 13 million 2018 30 million 13 million 17 million What is the NPV of a £2m investment in a physical asset if thediscount rate is 10% in the next 7 years?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 220
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 221
    • Because the NPV (£35.4m) ispositive, the benefits (£35.4m) of theinvestment exceed the cost(£2m). NPV:NetPresentValue© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 222
    • …however, DCF appraisaltechnique is imperfect. Why?© 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 223
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 224
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 225
    • © 2014 Berlin Asong. All rights reserved. 226