• Like
Building an agile business
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

Building an agile business

  • 430 views
Published

 

Published in Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
430
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.  Building  an  agile  business  in  the  Connected  Age  By  Barry  Thomas  “The  sky  is  falling,  the  sky  is  falling!”  It’s  tempting  to  believe  that  the  sky  is  indeed  falling,  in  some  sense  or  another,  as  the  pace  of  technological  and  societal  change  continues  to  accelerate.  There  are  plenty  of  pundits  and  consultants  willing  and  eager  to  explain  the  bewildering  array  of  threats  to  your  business  that  are  emerging  on  a  seemingly  daily  basis.  But  is  the  sky  really  falling?  The  answer,  as  is  so  often  the  case,  is  both  yes  and  no.  It  all  depends  on  context  and  perspective.  Things  unquestionably  change  faster  now  –  even  though  the  1990’s  ended  little  more  than  a  decade  ago  it  doesn’t  seem  at  all  odd  to  refer  to  them  as  “last  century”1.  And  the  amount  of  things  that  we  notice  changing  has  also  gone  up  dramatically  as  more  and  more  of  the  (rapidly!)  developing  world  gets  plugged  in  to  the  daily  news  cycle.  Only  a  short  time  ago  we  didn’t  really  need  to  give  much  thought  to  Chinese  computer  companies  and  Indian  car  manufacturers  –  but  we  ignore  them  at  our  peril  now.  High  apparent  rates  of  change  are  unquestionably  disconcerting  –  a  high  rate  of  change  of  anything  in  our  environment  will  automatically  trip  a  fight-­‐or-­‐flight  response  in  our  brains  –  but  it’s  important  to  keep  in  mind  that  people  don’t  change  as  fast  as  mobile  phones  or  Chinese  demographics.  Our  phones  may  be  running  iOS5  or  Android  3.0  but  our  minds  have  much  the  same  wiring  they  had  when  Cleopatra  was  a  girl.    To  put  it  another  way,  there’s  an  old  Zen  saying,  “Before  enlightenment,  chop  wood  and  carry  water.  After  enlightenment,  chop  wood  and  carry  water.”    This  saying  can  usefully  be  paraphrased  as,  “Before  Social  Media2,  make  good  products  and  provide  good  service.  After  Social  Media,  make  good  products  and  provide  good  service.”  This  is  not,  however,  to  suggest  that  there’s  nothing  to  be  concerned  about  and  that  blissful  ignorance  is  the  way  to  go.  The  world  is  shifting  under  our  feet  in  myriad  profound  ways.  But  an  aspect  of  change  that  must  be  understood  is  that,  for  any  specific  business,  very  little  of  the  marketplace  noise  constitutes  actual  falling  sky  pieces.  Most  of  it  is  either:   • irrelevant     • relevant  but  benign   • relevant  and  a  great  opportunity.  If  you  want  to  survive,  manage  and  leverage  the  changes  that  actually  matter  it  is  important  to  understand  what  these  changes  mean  in  the  context  of  your  own  business.  You  need  to  construct  a  strategy  and  a  business  structure  that  is  going  to  be  agile  enough  to  adjust  w here  adjustment  is  needed  but  that  will  also  give  you  the  confidence  and  security  you  need  to  be  able  to  ignore  Chicken  Little.                                                                                                                              1  Almost  a  quarter  of  all  the  goods  and  services  produced  since  1  AD  were  produced  in  the  last  ten  years  alone  -­‐  see  The  Economist  from  June  28,  2011.  2  Or  whatever  other  business  bête  noir  du  jour  you’d  like  to  insert.  ©  2011  Shirlaws.  All  Rights  Reserved.     Page  1    
  • 2.  A  survey  of  the  battlefield  The  first  step  in  identifying  what  changes  are,  and  are  not,  important  to  your  business  is  to  get  a  big  picture  view.  To  do  this  we  need  some  kind  of  unifying  framework  and,  because  ultimately  we’re  trying  to  judge  potential  impact  on  the  value  of  your  business,  the  Shirlaws  Valuation  Framework  is  as  good  a  place  to  start  as  any.  This  framework,  amongst  other  things,  identifies  seven  distinct  categories:  Clients   How  many  clients  do  you  have?  How  loyal  are  they?  Staff   Do  you  have  good  staff?  Can  you  keep  them?  Systems  and  processes   Can  you  reliably  repeat  good  results?  Products   Are  you  more  than  a  one-­‐hit  wonder?  Distribution   How  good  are  your  networks?  Positioning  and  Brand   Are  you  well-­‐known  for/as  something?  Scale   Can  you  replicate  your  success  in  other  markets?  Broadly  speaking  the  further  down  the  list  you  go  the  greater  the  leverage.  Double  your  clients  and  you  may  double  your  business’  value  (i.e.  a  1x  multiplier),  but  show  that  you  can  reliably  churn  out  new  successful  products  and  your  multiplier  may  become  much  higher.  A  key  consideration  if  you  want  to  grow  your  business  value  is  deciding  where  the  greatest  return  on  investment  lies  within  this  hierarchy.    In  conducting  an  analysis  like  this  it  is  traditional  to  talk  in  terms  of  threats  and  opportunities  but,  to  continue  the  Asian  philosophical  references,  you  could  also  usefully  think  in  terms  of  Yin  and  Yang  –  that  is,  of  interconnected  and  interdependent  sides  of  the  same  coin.  Yin  Things  you  might  reasonably  choose  to  be  worried  about  include  (but  are  by  no  means  limited  to):  Clients  Connected,  impatient,  cynical,  novelty  seeking  and  above  all  informed.   • Client  loyalty  is  a  tough  thing  to  maintain  in  a  world  where  people  are  (a)  always  able  to   find  a  more  enticing  offer,  if  it  exists,  and  (b)  endlessly  distracted  by  cool  new  stuff.    If   what  you  do  has  been  at  all  commoditized  the  question,  “what  have  you  done  for  me   lately?”  may  well  be  enough  to  make  your  blood  run  cold.   • In  the  past  it  was  commonly  the  case  that  the  vendor  knew  more  than  the  customer.   This  informational  asymmetry  has  all  but  disappeared.  The  ever-­‐growing  utility  of  rich   social  networks  and  the  Interwebs  mean  your  customers  may  well  know  more  about   your  market  (and  even  about  your  product)  than  you  do.   • The  evolving  relationship  between  clients  and  vendors  closely  mirrors  how  the  public’s   relationship  with  mass  media  has  shifted  with  the  rise  of  the  Internet.  Where  clients   were  once  content  to  sit  back  and  be  broadcast  at  they  now  expect  to  be  part  of  a   conversation.  And  if  they  dont  like  what  theyre  hearing  theyre  entirely  willing  and   able  to  go  start  a  different  conversation  with  someone  else.  ©  2011  Shirlaws.  All  Rights  Reserved.     Page  2    
  • 3.  Staff  Distracted,  impatient,  ambitious,  idealistic  and  assertive.   • The  challenge  with  staff  mirrors  the  challenge  with  clients.  Staff  today  can  choose  their   employers  in  much  the  same  way  they  choose  their  cars,  phones  and  washing  machines   –  with  full  access  to  effectively  unlimited  information  and  unfiltered  opinions  about   how  good  or  bad  you  are  at  “walking  your  talk”.     • Staff  can  also  be  fully  and  constantly  aware  of  their  true  value  and  of  their  employment   options.  It’s  no  longer  necessary  to  actively  hunt  for  a  new  job  –  the  Internet  can  do  if   for  you  and  regularly  deliver  job  offers  to  your  inbox.  Even  if  you’re  happy  in  your  job  it   never  hurts  to  keep  an  eye  out,  right?   • Gen  Y  may  be  the  most  cynical  generation  in  history.  They  may  give  you  the  benefit  of   the  doubt  but  once  you  lose  their  trust  (and  this  can  happen  in  an  instant)  you’ll   probably  never  get  it  back.  Systems  and  processes  Dynamic,  sophisticated,  flaky  and  permanently  unfinished.   • Expectations  of  product  quality  and  service  standards  have  never  been  higher  but  there   will  never  ever  be  enough  time  to  do  everything  right.    If  it  takes  you  a  year  to  build  a   new  system  or  refine  a  process  you  will  end  up  solving  last  year’s  problems  –  and  last   year  is  a  long,  long  time  ago  these  days.   • The  old  imperative  of  “make  the  sale”  is  being  replaced  by  a  new  one,  “collect  the  data”.   The  fact  that  you  sold  a  widget  to  a  customer  is  merely  a  starting  point.  Who  did  you  sell   the  widget  to?  Are  they  a  new  or  a  returning  customer?  How  did  they  discover  that  you   sell  widgets?  How  likely  are  they  to  buy  more  widgets  in  future?  Are  there  other   widget-­‐related  products  they  might  want?  Are  they  talking  about  their  purchase  from   you  on  Twitter  or  Facebook?  Are  they  an  influencer  in  their  social  network?  Are  they   likely  to  be  upset  about  you  collecting  all  this  data  about  them?  How  on  earth  are  you   going  to  make  sense  of  all  this  data  anyway?  Products  Awash  in  an  endlessly  creative  global  sea  of  competition.   • Do  you  feel  sorry  for  Nokia?  If  such  a  globally  dominant  provider  of  technically   excellent  products  can  be  utterly  derailed  by  an  upstart  with  no  prior  experience  or   credibility  in  its  industry  just  how  secure  are  you,  really?   • How  do  you  stay  ahead  in  a  world  where  everyone  is  innovating  at  crazy  speed  in   unimaginable  directions3?   • It’s  a  big  world  and  someone  out  there  is  probably  already  thinking  about  offering  some   or  all  of  what  you  do  for  free.  This  may  be  crazy  in  the  context  of  your  business  model   but  it  might  make  perfect  sense  from  their  perspective4.  If  you  suddenly  had  to  compete   with  free  how  would  you  differentiate  your  product?                                                                                                                            3  To  take  one  small  example,  wouldn’t  it  be  great  if  using  your  phone  to  take  a  photo  of  an  unfamiliar  object  (a  bottle  of  wine  of  dubious  provenance  for  instance)  was  all  you  needed  to  do  to  find  out  everything  there  is  to  know  about  that  object?  Oh,  wait  -­‐  you  can  already  do  this,  with  Google  Goggles.  4  For  example  it  makes  sense  for  Google  to  give  Android  away  (because  it  drives  up  demand  for  mobile  search  and  the  attendant  advertising)  but  the  existence  of  a  good,  free  phone  operating  system  presents  a  huge  challenge  to,  for  instance,  Microsoft.  And  what  do  you  think  the  for-­‐profit  ©  2011  Shirlaws.  All  Rights  Reserved.     Page  3    
  • 4.  Distribution  Dismemberment  by  disintermediation.   • iTunes  vs.  Tower  Records  and  Amazon.com  vs.  Borders.  Enough  said.  Positioning  and  Brand  Something  you  now  have  to  earn,  not  just  create.   • In  a  connected  world  your  reputation  is  by  far  your  most  important  asset.   Unfortunately  your  reputation  is  no  longer  something  you  create  (which  is  what  old-­‐ school  marketing  and  PR  was  all  about),  it’s  something  you  discover  by  listening   carefully  to  what  your  constituency  are  saying  about  you.  The  only  reliable  way  you  can   shape  your  reputation  is  by  actually  being  who  you  say  you  are.   • While  your  positioning  and  brand  are  harder  than  ever  to  shape  they  are  also  more   important  than  ever.  In  a  time-­‐  and  attention-­‐poor  world  your  brand  is  a  crucial  anchor   that  prospective  customers  use  to  categorise  you  as  relevant/irrelevant  to  their  current   needs  and  interests.  Scale  The  best  defense  is  a  good  offense,  or  “do  unto  others  before  they  do  unto  you”.   • If  you’ve  managed  to  identify  and  fill  a  lucrative  niche  the  chances  are,  in  this  hyper-­‐ connected  world,  that  someone  has  already  noticed  and  begun  copying  and/or   improving  on  some  or  all  of  whatever  it  is  you  do.  Their  next  step  may  be  to  scale  up   and  invade  what  you  currently  think  of  as  your  territory.  This  is  not  necessarily  a  bad   thing  (they  may  be  willing  to  pay  a  good  price  to  buy  you  out  for  instance)  but  the   initiative  will  have  clearly  moved  out  of  your  hands.  Yang  Things  you  might  reasonably  choose  to  be  excited  about  include  (but  are  by  no  means  limited  to):  Clients  Nearly  7  billion  of  them!   • Globalisation  and  the  Internet  have  given  us  the  capacity  and  opportunity  to  sell  to  very   nearly  anyone,  anywhere.  Not  only  can  we  easily  communicate  with  people  from  Kiama   to  Khazakstan,  we  can  also  cost-­‐effectively  rent  the  supply  chain  functionality  required   to  deliver  our  products  to  them.   • We  now  have  a  vast  array  of  new  ways  to  engage  with  out  clients  and  potential  clients,   to  turn  them  into  willing  collaborators  and  even  evangelists  for  our  products.  All  we   have  to  do  is  to  be  worthy  of  our  client’s  passion.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              educational  sector  thinks  of  the  idea  of  “a  free  world-­‐class  education  to  anyone  anywhere”,  (as  brilliantly  offered  by  the  Khan  Academy)?  ©  2011  Shirlaws.  All  Rights  Reserved.     Page  4    
  • 5.  Staff  Eager  for  something  to  believe  in.   • The  flip  side  of  the  cynicism  of  Gen  Y  is  that  they  are  also  desperate  for  causes  to  believe   in  and  to  fight  for.  If  they  believe  in  the  integrity  of  your  vision  they  will  engage  with  it   and  support  it  wholeheartedly  (they  will  also  hold  you  to  account  if  your  integrity  starts   to  slip  but  that’s  another  story).     • Good  staff  today  are  very  good  –  knowledgeable,  flexible,  imaginative  and  self-­‐ motivated.  Your  biggest  problem  may  simply  be  keeping  up  with  them.  Systems  and  processes  Rentable!   • An  ever-­‐expanding  array  of,  well,  just  about  anything  a  business  needs  is  now  available   on  demand  via  the  Internet.  In  some  contexts  this  is  “the  Cloud”  (broadly  speaking,   applications  and  services  running  on  remote  web  servers  and  accessed  via  web   browsers)  and  in  others  it’s  just  web-­‐mediated  outsourcing  (for  instance  ultra-­‐cheap   virtual  personal  assistants  operating  from  India  or  the  Philippines).  The  net  impact  is   that  the  capital  costs  (and  thus  the  risks)  of  setting  up  a  new  business  or  business   division  can  be  much  lower  and  start-­‐up  times  can  be  much  quicker.   • These  days  there  is  a  much-­‐improved  understanding  of  the  distinction  between   algorithmic  and  heuristic  processes.  Algorithmic  processes  can  be  best  implemented  via   explicit  instructions  –  i.e.  where  the  need  is  to  do  the  same  thing  again  and  again  with   minimal  variation.  This  is  where  Total  Quality  Management  and  its  ilk  are  most   appropriate.  Heuristic  processes  on  the  other  hand  are  ones  best  governed  by   intelligently  interpreted  rules  of  thumb.  In  such  cases  the  best  outcomes  are  typically   delivered  by  well-­‐trained  and  motivated  employees  that  have  the  autonomy  to  solve   problems  as  they  think  best.    Products  A  proliferation  of  niches.   • Two  powerful  trends  are  driving  an  explosion  in  the  number  of  distinct  product  niches   available  to  be  filled:       1. Customers  increasingly  take  “mass  customization”  for  granted5.  They’re  no  longer   willing  to  change  their  behavior  to  fit  the  product;  they  expect  a  product  or  service   to  be  configured  to  do  what  they,  specifically,  want.   2. Logistically  impractical  niches  (model  train  enthusiasts  in  Croatia,  surfers  in  the   Shetland  Islands…you  get  the  idea)  are  now  within  reach.  And  if  you  don’t  find   them  they  may  well  (via  your  web  presence)  find  you.   • The  increasing  opportunities  to  truly  understand  customer  needs  –  whether  via  social   media  and  other  forms  of  online  engagement  or,  more  controversially,  via  “big  data”  –   opens  up  limitless  opportunities,  “Companies  that  can  harness  big  data  will  trample   data-­incompetents.  Data  equity,  to  coin  a  phrase,  will  become  as  important  as  brand   equity.”  6                                                                                                                            5  In  Shirlaws  language  highly  personalized  products  and  services  have,  in  many  markets,  largely  shifted  from  being  “extras”  to  being  “standards”.  6  See  Big  data:  the  next  frontier  for  innovation,  competition  and  productivity  and  The  Economist  from  26  May  2011.  ©  2011  Shirlaws.  All  Rights  Reserved.     Page  5    
  • 6.  Distribution  Done  for  you,  if  you’re  worth  it.   • The  Internet  is  now  the  mother  of  all  channels,  and  what’s  more  it’s  self-­‐organising.  If   you  do  anything  that  anyone  cares  about  someone  will  blog  about  it,  create  a  user  group   for  it  or  assign  a  Twitter  hashtag  to  it.  Note  however  that  their  reason  for  caring  could   as  easily  be  negative  as  positive.    Positioning  and  Brand  Most  businesses  still  fail  to  genuinely  stand  for  something.  There  is  endless  opportunity  to  stake  out  some  high-­‐value  territory.  Your  customers  will  love  you  for  it  AND  they’ll  tell  all  their  friends  about  you.  Scale  The  world  is  your  oyster.  Turning  insight  into  action  The  single  most  important  thing  to  understand  about  this  (admittedly  superficial)  survey  is  that,  for  any  given  business,  most  of  what  I’ve  mentioned  is  simply  going  to  be  of  little  immediate  relevance.  In  reading  this  you  may,  at  most,  have  noted  a  handful  of  threats  and/or  opportunities  that  would  be  currently  actionable  by  your  business  today.  To  put  it  another  way,  there  is  plenty  here  that  is  interesting  but  probably  not  all  that  much  that  is  useful  in  the  context  of  a  specific  business  at  this  particular  point  in  time.    Directing  your  attention  and  energy  at  activities  with  low  marginal  utility  is,  as  always,  a  losing  strategy.  The  challenge  for  any  business  in  these  highly  dynamic  times  is  twofold:   1. Resource  allocation  –  that  is,  picking  your  battles  for  maximal  practical  result,  and     2. Maintaining  focus  in  a  noisy  environment  where  every  pundit  and  his  dog  will  tell   you  there’s  an  endless  list  of  other  things  to  worry  about.  It  is  perhaps  instructive  at  this  point  to  consider  the  example  of  Apple,  the  patron  saint  (if  a  corporate  entity  can  be  considered  for  sainthood)  of  predicting  the  future  by  inventing  it.  It  has  been  observed  that,     “…while  most  companies  have  a  tendency  to  fire,  then  aim,  Apple  is  diligent  in   assessing  all  of  the  moving  parts  of  a  strategy,  and  ensuring  they  have  extreme   confidence  in  both  the  viability  of  the  path  and  their  ability  to  execute  on  that   path…Apple  begins  with  a  3.0  vision  that  guides  1.0  execution.  This  ‘begin  with   the  end  in  mind’  sensibility  and  patience  has  repeatedly  rewarded  the  company   and  its  constituency.”7  It  would  be  fair  to  say  that  Apple  understands  positioning  and  brand  as  well  as  any  company  on  the  planet,  but  this  doesn’t  make  them  slavishly  reactive  to  shifting  market  trends  and  public  sentiment.  On  the  contrary  their  defining  characteristics  appear  to  be  admirable  strategic  clarity  coupled  with  utterly  disciplined  implementation.  Clarity,  focus  and  discipline  are  not,  however,  inventions  of  Apple  Inc.    The  Roman  legions  had  it  all  in  spades  a  couple  of  millennia  ago.  We  can  all  do  it,  if  we  want  to  enough.                                                                                                                              7  See  O’Reilly  Radar,  8  June  2011.  ©  2011  Shirlaws.  All  Rights  Reserved.     Page  6