CIMA Executive Briefing on Leading and Engaging a Multigenerational Workforce 8 January 2013

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Master Facilitator: Prof Sattar Bawany, Strategic Advisor, IPMA Asia Pacific
Date: Tuesday, 8 January 2013
Venue: Cinnamon Grand Hotel, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Organiser: Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA), Sri Lanka

Governments around the world are committed to raising productivity to improve economic performance. As the research of the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) has demonstrated repeatedly over the past decade, productivity at the sector level is driven by the degree to which companies are exposed to competition. Hence, the argument goes, governments should remove barriers to competition, such as excessive regulation, if higher productivity is the goal.

Future growth in Singapore lies in increasing productivity in every sector and innovation in serving export markets. But what exactly is productivity within the context of an organisation? What is innovation? Can these concepts be measured, what processes and skills are needed to become world class in productivity and innovation management? What can we learn from global players like Apple, Google, South West Airlines and others?

The subject of employee engagement as a measure of productivity and management strategies to increase engagement have been hot topics since the original Gallup organization research was published. While most of the research identifies low levels of employee engagement in many organizations and strategies to increase that engagement for the purpose of improving productivity, the cause-and-effect relationship is not overwhelming. Rather, an overarching strategy of increasing employee well-being in which engagement strategies are incorporated, appears to be more favourable.

The Gallup organization defined employee engagement as "an employee's involvement with, commitment to, and satisfaction with work." Research conducted in the past decade has shown that employee engagement has declined significantly in most industries, with some research citing as few as 29% of employees being actively engaged in their jobs. The Hay Group found in its research that in among office workers who were actively engaged, they were 43% more productive. Various research studies have shown that the following factors influence employee engagement: Employers' commitment to and concern for employee welfare; employee perceptions of job importance; clarity of job expectations; career advancement opportunities; regular dialogue with superiors; quality of working relationships with co-workers and superiors; perceptions of the ethos and values of the organization; and employee rewards and recognition.

Organisations struggle with the challenges of effectively managing a more diverse workforce. These challenges often relate to variation in perspective, values and belief systems as a result of generational differences and are further complicated due to the age differences between managers and employees.

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  • Each Generation has its own characteristics:Major events in our formative years shape our attitudes, opinions and perception of life, family, friends, authority, politics and work.How multi-generational differences are managed, largely depends on Emotional Intelligence
  • Goleman, D. (1995) Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. New York: Bantam Books.This is where emotional intelligence comes in - Developing the capacity to understand andmanage your feelings and deal effectively with others, no matter how great the differences, is acritical competence and key to your professional success. In today’s workplace, where it’s not uncommon to find four or five generations, multiple languages, many ethnicities and races, anddifferences in gender, sexual orientation, religion, personalities and values, dealing with differences is a reality and a key requirement. How well you do that will depend in great part on your emotional intelligence.
  • CIMA Executive Briefing on Leading and Engaging a Multigenerational Workforce 8 January 2013

    1. 1. LEVERAGING ON WIDERGENERATION: CHALLENGE OROPPORTUNITYLeading and Engaging a Multigenerational WorkforceProf Sattar BawanyStrategic Advisor, IPMA Asia PacificManaging Director, EDA Asia PacificTuesday, 8 January 2013Cinnamon Grand, Colombo, Sri Lanka © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    2. 2. 2Are You A Tiger Or Deer? Every morning in Asia, a deer wakes up. It knows it must run faster than the fastest tiger or it will be killed.Every morning in Asia, a tigerwakes up. It knows it mustoutrun the slowest deer or itwill starve to death.It doesn‟t matter whether you are a tiger or a deer: when thesun comes up, you‟d better be running….. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    3. 3. 3Knowing Yourself © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    4. 4. 4The S.C.O.P.E. Approach S HARE C HALLENGE O PEN MINDED P LAN TO IMPLEMENT E NJOY OURSELVES © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    5. 5. 5 Who We Are The International Professional Managers Association (IPMA) is a global „not-for-profit‟ (NPO) members organisation headquartered in Kent, UK with Regional Offices in Europe, Africa and Asia Pacific IPMA mission as an International Examining, Licensing and Regulatory Membership Qualifying Professional Body to improve managerial performance at all levels IPMA is the Strategic Partner of Executive Development Associates Inc. (EDA) for executive coaching and custom- designed leadership development solutions to accelerate individual performance EDA established in 1982 is a pioneer and leader in creating custom-designed learning and executive/leadership development strategies, programs and processes to help clients (many Fortune 500 companies) achieve their strategic objectives and win in the marketplace. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg 5
    6. 6. 6 About Your Facilitator – Prof Bawany Strategic Advisor, IPMA Asia Pacific Managing Director & C-Suite Coach with EDA Asia Pacific Co-Chair of the Human Capital Committee of the American Chamber of Commerce in Singapore (AmCham Singapore). Member of Frontier Strategy Group‟s Expert Advisory Network (EAN) for Talent Management issues in Asia Pacific advising CEOs and CHROs of global and regional organisations. Over 25 years‟ international business management in executive coaching, facilitation, leadership development and training Adjunct Professor of Strategy at Paris Graduate School of Management teaching international business strategies, leadership development and human resource courses Previously assumed senior leadership roles with global management & HR consulting firms: DBM Asia Pacific, Mercer Human Resource Consulting, The Hay Group and Forum Corp © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg 6
    7. 7. 7Workshop ObjectivesThis workshop will provide you with a foundation of knowledgethat will enable you to: Better understand the factors and historical period experiences that shape each generation Develop more effective communication and influencing strategies for each generation of employees Enhance your understanding of the workforce realities created by five generations in the workplace, including the potential points of conflict between each generation Learn the best practices required to lead and engage the multigenerational employees towards increasing productivity and achieve business outcomes © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    8. 8. The New Workplace Realities © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    9. 9. 9Multi-Generational Workplace:Danger or Opportunity?Our multigenerational work environment can bea source of positive challenge, opportunity and significant growth if managed effectively and leveraged to meet the business goals of our organization. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    10. 10. 10Shifting Demographics By 2017, workers in the US, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Singapore, Italy and the U.K. aged 50 and over will make up more than 40% of the workforce (AARP Profit from Experience, 2007) and will be poised to retire in large numbers within the next ten years. Gen X represents a much smaller pool of available workers and will not be able to fill the positions left vacant by retirements (Institute for the Future, 2003). In light of this predicted labor and skills shortage, it is imperative for forward-thinking companies to focus on retaining older workers and increasing their ability to recruit and engage younger workers. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    11. 11. 11 Present Day WorkforceMost employees are: Working in multi-generational teams View that multi-generational teams improve organizational performanceKey findings from survey commissioned by TAFEP: Together, Gen X and Gen Y make up 60% of the workforce Means that 40% of the workforce is over 45 years of ageSource: Tripartite Alliance for Fair Employment Practices (TAFEP) www.fairemployment.sg © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    12. 12. 12 © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sgSource: The Straits Times, Singapore 8 April 2010
    13. 13. 13 Overview of Generational Differences Traditionalists Baby Boomers Gen X Gen Y (Born before 1946) (Born 1946-1964) (Born 1965-1980) (Born after 1980)Career Legacy Stellar Career Portable Career Parallel CareersGoalsRewards Satisfaction of a Money, Title, Freedom Is The Work That Has Job Well Done Recognition, Corner Ultimate Reward Meaning OfficeWork-Life Support in shifting Help me balance Give me Work isn‟tBalance the balance everyone else and balance NOW! everything. find meaning in Not when I‟m 65 Flexibility to myself balance my other activitiesJob Carries a stigma Puts you behind Is Necessary Is ExpectedChangingTraining I learned the hard Train them too much The more they Continuous way, you can too! and they‟ll leave learn, the more learning is a way they‟ll stay of lifeSource: Lynne C. Lancaster and David Stillman „When Generations Collide: How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work‟, 2002. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    14. 14. 14Why are Multigenerational Differencesan Issue? Multi-generational work environments can breed misunderstanding, conflict, and can compromise growth. Each generation has its own characteristics; different values and workplace concepts (Eg. Work-life balance, loyalty, teamwork) are understood differently. Multi Generational workplaces can be a source of positive challenge, opportunity, and significant growth if managed effectively. Hence, it is increasingly important to know how to bridge inter- generational differences at work. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    15. 15. 15Gen Y – Y Are They Different © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    16. 16. 16Gen Y: Can’t work with or without them The quarterly Hudson Report, found 62% of 450 local respondents had trouble managing staff aged 30 and under, as they felt these Gen Ys have unrealistic job expectations and are too impatient. Executives polled also believed that Gen Y employees lack loyalty, need constant attention and have little respect for authority. Despite that, employers across all industries still realised the importance of not only retaining top Gen Y talent, but also developing them. Source: http://jobs.sg.hudson.com/documents/Hudson_Report_Q4_2011_-_Singapore.pdf © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    17. 17. 17Exercise: Managing the ROI on Gen Y? Calculate Your Current (and Future) Investment in Gen Y:  How many Gen Y employees does your organisation currently have?  What is the average compensation for Gen Y employee at your organisation?  Multiply the number of Gen Y employees x Your average compensation. Can be seen as the risk your organisation takes in assuming Gen Y will meet your employment needs. The better managed this investment, the lower the risk and the better return for all involved. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    18. 18. 18Gen Z or The Linksters The Linkster Generation (those born after 1995) is the one just entering the workforce now. Like any other generation, it brings its own mindset into the workforce. Linksters primarily work part-time while attending school. They are called Linksters because no other generation has ever been so linked to each other and to the world through technology. Their struggles in the work environment are tied to their youth and inexperience. They are complete digital natives and cannot function without communicating through social media. Desire for change, stimulation, learning and promotion that will conflict with traditional organisational hierarchies.Source: Generations, Inc., by Meagan Johnson and Larry Johnson. 2010, AMACOM. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    19. 19. 19 Managing Gen Z Get them into a routine that they can master. Generation Z will be unlike Baby Boomers, who are often loyal to a firm. They don‟t expect jobs for life and will move onto the next job, similar to Generation Y. Managers of Generation Z employees will have to be prepared to give regular feedback that tells them they are making a difference to the organisation Development and work/life balance are more important than financial reward, with both Gen Y & Z being committed to their own personal learning and development.Source: Edge Online Future of work - Employees 3.0: Managing Generation Z published on 28 August 2012http://www.i-l-m.com/edge/managing_generation_Z.aspx © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    20. 20. 20Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDAdaaupMno © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    21. 21. Leading and Engaging aMultigenerational Workforce © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    22. 22. 22© 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    23. 23. 23Engaging Multigenerational Workforce • Profitability Organisational Results • ROI • Cost Optimisation • Customer Satisfaction/Loyalty Customer Engagement • Service Value/ Relationship • Employee Satisfaction Employee Engagement • Employee Loyalty • Company Policies Organisational Climate • Rewards and Flexibility • Culture, Espirit De Corps • EQ/EI Competencies • Managerial Skills Leadership Effectiveness • Leadership StylesReference: Sattar Bawany, “Ways to achieve Organisational Success: Role of Leaders in Engaging the Multi-Generational Workforce” Singapore Business Review, 1st November 2011,http://sbr.com.sg/hreducation/commentary/ways-achieve-incredible-organizational-success-0 © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    24. 24. 24 Leading Gen Y EmployeesLeadership Characteristics Leadership CharacteristicsThat Gen Y-ers Want Their That Managers From TheLeaders To Demonstrate Other Generations Believe In Demonstrating To Gen Y-ers1. Caring (54%) 1. Competent (54%)2. Inspiring (45%) 2. Honest (32%)3. Competent (44%) 3. Forward-looking (31%) *Numbers in parentheses reflect percentage of respondents who selected this as a preferred strategy.Source: “‟Y‟ Are They Different” – A Study of Gen Y at Work, Their Views and How They are Viewed,Published by GMP & Temasek Polytechnic, 2009 http://www.gmprecruit.com/resource_hub/..%5Cpdf%5CResourceHub%5Cgeny_press.pdf © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    25. 25. 25 Engaging Gen Y EmployeesTop Factors That Motivate Gen Retention Strategies MostY To Stay In Organizations Utilized By Organizations1. Opportunities for Career 1. Opportunities for CareerAdvancement (63%) Advancement (43%)2. Good Work-Life Harmony (41%) 2. Emphasis on Learning & Development (37%)3. Good Relationships (40%) 3. Good Compensation (24%) *Numbers in parentheses reflect percentage of respondents who selected this as a preferred strategy. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    26. 26. 26 Group Exercise: How Does the Multi- Generational Workforce Impact Employers? HR professionals can play a strategic role by partnering with their Business Leaders in meeting the needs of their employees. Are there specific business units that have a higher percentage of baby boomers set to retire in the next 10 years? What are some possible flexible work options that will simultaneously attract all generations while encouraging Traditionalists and Boomers to remain employed and play key roles in knowledge transfer, leadership development, and mentoring of younger workers? How can Human Resources professionals coach managers to maximize the performance of each generation? What specific tactics are HR professionals using to attract the „best and brightest‟ of the Gen Y employees that might differ from strategies used for other generations? © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    27. 27. 27 Video on Engaging Your Gen Y & Z How great leaders inspire action - Simon Sinek has a simple but powerful model for inspirational leadership all starting with a golden circle and the question "Why?”. Why should your Talent remain with your Organisation and as your Follower? “If you hire people just because they can do a job, they‟ll work for your money. But if you hire people who believe what you believe, they‟ll work for you with blood and sweat and tears.” - Simon SinekReferences:http://www.startwithwhy.com/http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qp0HIF3SfI4http://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action.html © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg 27
    28. 28. Multigenerational Conflicts © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    29. 29. 29Multi-Generational Conflict:Striving for Collaboration Nearly 60 percent of HR managers at large companies say they have observed office conflicts that flow from generational differences, according to the Society for Human Resource Management. Tensions typically stem from perceptions of loyalty and respect. “Even though the generations are different, it does not necessarily mean they hold divisive values and attitudes that will affect their ability to work well together” (Giancola, 2006). Organizations are reaping the benefits of the diversity provided by workers of different generations collaborating effectively and learning from one another. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    30. 30. 30 Intergenerational Conflict Findings according to a study, commissioned by the Tripartite Alliance for Fair Employment Practices (TAFEP): Employees aged 30 and above, particularly the older ones, have the most difficulty working with colleagues belonging to Gen Y – those aged 29 and below. Conversely, Gen Y employees have fewer difficulties working with older colleagues“… should be sensitive towards (inter-generational issues) as the workforce becomes increasingly diverse…” – Singapore Deputy PM Teo Chee Hean Source: myPaper, 8 April 2010 © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    31. 31. 31 Potential Workplace Conflicts Traditionalists Baby Boomers Gen X Gen Y (Born before 1946) (Born 1946-1964) (Born 1965-1980) (Born after 1980)Potential • Reluctant to buck • Uncomfortable with • Skeptical • View changing jobs the system and conflict • Distrust authority as a naturalChallenges speak up when they process • Sometimes put • May not be disagree process ahead of attracted to • Likes to instill a • Uncomfortable with results leadership positions sense of play and conflict fun in the workPerception • Despise workers • Might believe that • Need to be • Multi-tasking who appear to jump employees who fail reminded to abilities can be ladder rungs without to put in „extra time‟ delegate construed as rude „paying their dues‟ lack commitment, tasks and • Might not be as focus and loyalty responsibilities conscious to issues • Might not recognize on cross culture the off-site contribution of employeesCommunication • Feedback is not • Documented • Frequent, honest • Immediate necessary, but they feedback on a feedback to know feedback that tells want to know that yearly basis is they are on the right them what they are they have made a sufficient track doing right or wrong differenceSource: Lynne C. Lancaster and David Stillman „When Generations Collide: How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work‟, 2002. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    32. 32. 32 Multigenerational Communication Keeping these generational differences in mind can make dealing with co-workers, less of a challenge. Remember to discard biases and preconceived notions and enjoy the generational differences © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    33. 33. 33Tips on Resolving IntergenerationalConflict1. Look at the generational factor2. Air different generations perceptions3. Find a generationally appropriate fix4. Find commonality and complements5. Learn from each otherSource: Five Steps to Resolving Workplace Conflict by Larry and Meagan Johnson posted 21 Dec 2010http://www.baselinemag.com/c/a/IT-Management/Five-Steps-to-Resolving-Workplace-Conflict-521241/ © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    34. 34. Resolving Multigenerational Conflicts with Emotional Intelligence © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    35. 35. 35Emotional Intelligence (EI) & EQEmotional Intelligence, also called EI and oftenmeasured as an Emotional Intelligence Quotient (EQ),describes an ability, capacity, or skill to perceive,assess, and manage the emotions of ones self, ofothers, and of groups.“The diversity of… generations provides a unique opportunity forknowledge sharing. But because employees in the various agegroups may not naturally interact with each other on a daily basis,you may need to make a concerted effort to facilitatecollaboration.” - Katherine Spencer Lee © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    36. 36. 36 Emotional Intelligence Quotient (EQ) “The capacity for recognising our own feelings and those of others, for motivating ourselves, for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships.”Goleman, D. (1995) Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. New York: Bantam Books.Goleman, D. (1998) Working with Emotional Intelligence. New York: Bantam Books. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    37. 37. 37Group Exercise: EI Mini QuizImportant Note: The purpose of the following short quiz is toprovide you with an application of Emotional Intelligence (EI).The results you get from this quiz are NOT a comprehensivepicture of your EQ. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    38. 38. 38 “Anyone can become angry – that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way – that is not easy.” Aristotle in „Nicomachean Ethics‟Goleman, D. (1995) Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. New York: Bantam Books. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    39. 39. 39 Scenario 1. You are a Gen Y employee in a meeting when a Baby-Boomer colleague takes credit for work that you have done. What do you do?A. Immediately and publicly confront the colleague over the ownership of your work.B. After the meeting, take the colleague aside and tell her that you would appreciate in the future that she credits you when speaking about your work.C. Nothing, its not a good idea to embarrass colleagues in public.D. After the colleague speaks, publicly thank her for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg 39
    40. 40. 40 Answer for Scenario 1 - The credit stealing colleague: The most emotionally intelligent answer is D. By demonstrating an awareness of work-place dynamics, and an ability to control your emotional responses, publicly recognizing your own accomplishments in a non- threatening manner, will disarm your colleague as well as puts you in a better light with your manager and peers. Public confrontations can be ineffective, are likely to cause your colleague to become defensive. A. 0 Points – Immediately and publicly confront the colleague over the ownership of your work. B. 5 Points – After the meeting, take the colleague aside and tell her that you would appreciate in the future that she credits you when speaking about your work. C. 0 Points – Nothing, its not a good idea to embarrass colleagues in public. D. 10 Points – After the colleague speaks, publicly thank her for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sgWorkshop on High Performance Leadership for Menlo Worldwide Logistics
    41. 41. 41 Scenario 2: You are a Gen X Manager in an organization that is trying to encourage respect for racial and ethnic diversity. You overhear a Gen Y employee telling both sexist and racist jokes. What do you do?A. Ignore it – the best way to deal with these things is not to react.B. Call the person into your office and explain that their behavior is inappropriate and is grounds for disciplinary action if repeated.C. Speak up on the spot, saying that such jokes are inappropriate and will not be tolerated in your organization.D. Suggest to the person telling the joke he go through a diversity training program. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    42. 42. 42 Answer for Scenario 2 - The Racist Joke: The most emotionally intelligent answer is C. The most effective way to create an atmosphere that welcomes diversity is to make clear in public that the social norms of your organization do not tolerate such expressions. Confronting the behavior privately lets the individual know the behavior is unacceptable, but does not communicate it to the team. Instead of trying to change prejudices (a much harder task), keep people from acting on them.A. 0 Points – Ignore it - the best way to deal with these things is not to react.B. 5 Points – Call the person into your office and explain that their behavior is inappropriate and is grounds for disciplinary action if repeated.C. 10 Points – Speak up on the spot, saying that such jokes are inappropriate and will not be tolerated in your organization.D. 5 Points – Suggest to the person telling the joke he go through a diversity training program. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    43. 43. 43 Scenario 3. You are a Gen Y Manager and have recently been assigned a Baby Boomer in your team, and have noticed that he appears to be unable to make the simplest of decisions without seeking advice from you. What do you do?A. Accept that he "does not have what it take to succeed around here" and find others in your team to take on his tasks.B. Get an HR manager to talk to him about where he sees his future in the organization.C. Purposely give him lots of complex decisions to make so that he will become more confident in the role.D. Engineer an ongoing series of challenging but manageable experiences for him, and make yourself available to act as his mentor. © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    44. 44. 44Answer for Scenario 3 - The indecisive BabyBoomer Employee:The most emotionally intelligent answer is D. Managing multigenerationalemployees requires high levels of emotional intelligence, particularly if youare going to be successful in maximizing the performance of your team.Often, this means that you need to tailor your approach to meets the specificgenerational needs of the individual, and provide them with support to helpthem grow in confidence.A. 0 Points – Accept that he does not have what it take to succeed around here and find others in your team to take on his tasksB. 5 Points – Get an HR manager to talk to him about where he sees his future in the organizationC. 0 Points – Purposely give him lots of complex decisions to make so that he will become more confident in the roleD. 10 Points – Engineer an ongoing series of challenging but manageable experiences for him, and make yourself his mentor (reverse mentoring) © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    45. 45. 45Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fVHnug8H1MM © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    46. 46. 46Recommendations Communicate is key to inspire Commitment “Opportunities for Career Advancement” and “Good Relationships” are key factors that motivate Gen Y-ers to remain in organisations.• Engage Gen Y through Coaching and develop Coaching competency of managers to be comfortable and confident in having conversations surrounding professional development plans.• Encourage constant feedback and show recognition for Y- er‟s work contribution• Team Work „Y‟ & Linksters (Gen Z) Style: Encourage staff gatherings, social events and „mixers‟ with workmates © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    47. 47. 47 Conclusions• Each generation brings to the table different approaches to - Work, Interaction, and how they view business strategies• The end result is a greater diversity and variety of opinions, creativity and talent• When managed effectively, a multigenerational team can add tremendous value to your organization• However, as employees in the various age groups may not naturally interact with each other, leaders may need to adopt different leadership styles and make a concerted effort to facilitate collaboration and reduce bias © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    48. 48. 48Video: Make Makes a Great Leader? Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03o1JZ7c7gI © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    49. 49. 49Final Thoughts If you do tomorrow what you did yesterday Your Future is History…………… If you do tomorrow what we’ve covered today Your Future is Historic!!! © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg
    50. 50. 50Keeping in Touch on Social Media Prof Sattar Bawany Strategic Advisor, IPMA Asia Pacific & Managing Director, EDA Asia Pacific Email: sattar.bawany@ipma.com.sg LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/bawany Facebook: www.facebook.com/ipma.singapore Twitter: www.twitter.com/sattarbawany Skype: sattar.bawany © 2013 IPMA Asia Pacific www.ipma.com.sg

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