rethinking marketing
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Does marketing fit as just one of the functions inside organization? Or it goes further to business thinking and modelling? This is my first presentation where I try to bring a thought that......

Does marketing fit as just one of the functions inside organization? Or it goes further to business thinking and modelling? This is my first presentation where I try to bring a thought that marketing is more about business modelling, development and business model innovation rather than commonly attributed "advertising", "communication", "brand/marketing managment".

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  • http://www.youtube.com/user/businessmodeltv?feature=watchhttp://www.businessmodelalchemist.com/
  • Reinventing Your Business Modelby Mark W. Johnson, Clayton M. Christensen, and Henning Kagermannhttp://hbr.org/2008/12/reinventing-your-business-model/ar/pr
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/businessmodeltv?feature=watchhttp://www.businessmodelalchemist.com/

Transcript

  • 1. rethinking marketingwhat is marketing today, and where will it be tomorrow? Бауржан Исаев
  • 2. FOCUS: FOCUS:Help exploit the latest Address unsatisfiedtechnological customer needs anddevelopments with build new businessright business model models around them
  • 3. Adizes’ PAEI management roles Hofstede’s cultural dimensionsAnsoff’s product/market grid Just-in-timeThe balanced scorecard KaizenThe BCG matrix Kay’s distinctive capabilitiesBelbin’s team roles Kotter’s eight phases of changeBenchmarking Kraljic’s purchasing modelThe Berenschot project management model Levers of controlBusiness process redesign MABA analyisThe capability maturity model The Malcolm Baldrige AwardChange quadrants The marketing mixThe chaos model MaslowCompeting values of organizational effectiveness The 7-S frameworkCompetitive analysis: Porter’s five forces Mintzberg’s configurationsCompliance typology Mintzberg’s management rolesCore competencies The neurotic organizationCore quadrants Nolan’s IT growth stagesCovey’s seven habits of highly effective people Overhead value analysisCustomer marketing and relationship management Parenting advantageThe Deming cycle The purposive change modelThe EFQM model Risk reward analysisEisenhower’s effective time management Scenario planning (Shell)EVA – economic value added Schools of strategy synthesisContents The seven forces modelThe fifth discipline Sociotechnical organizationFour competencies of the learning organization SWOT analysisGeneric competitive strategies Value-based managementThe gods of management The value chainGreiner’s growth model Value disciplines
  • 4. Adizes’ PAEI management roles Hofstede’s cultural dimensionsAnsoff’s product/market grid Just-in-timeThe balanced scorecard KaizenThe BCG matrix Kay’s distinctive capabilitiesBelbin’s team roles Kotter’s eight phases of changeBenchmarking Kraljic’s purchasing modelThe Berenschot project management model Levers of controlBusiness process redesign MABA analyisThe capability maturity model The Malcolm Baldrige AwardChange quadrants The marketing mixThe chaos model MaslowCompeting values of organizational effectiveness The 7-S frameworkCompetitive analysis: Porter’s five forces Mintzberg’s configurationsCompliance typology Mintzberg’s management rolesCore competencies The neurotic organizationCore quadrants Nolan’s IT growth stagesCovey’s seven habits of highly effective people Overhead value analysisCustomer marketing and relationship management Parenting advantageThe Deming cycle The purposive change modelThe EFQM model Risk reward analysisEisenhower’s effective time management Scenario planning (Shell)EVA – economic value added Schools of strategy synthesisContents The seven forces modelThe fifth discipline Sociotechnical organizationFour competencies of the learning organization SWOT analysisGeneric competitive strategies Value-based managementThe gods of management The value chainGreiner’s growth model Value disciplines
  • 5. Adizes’ PAEI management roles Hofstede’s cultural dimensionsAnsoff’s product/market grid Just-in-timeThe balanced scorecard KaizenThe BCG matrix Kay’s distinctive capabilitiesBelbin’s team roles Kotter’s eight phases of changeBenchmarking Kraljic’s purchasing modelThe Berenschot project management model Levers of controlBusiness process redesign MABA analyisThe capability maturity model The Malcolm Baldrige AwardChange quadrants The marketing mixThe chaos model MaslowCompeting values of organizational effectiveness The 7-S frameworkCompetitive analysis: Porter’s five forces Mintzberg’s configurationsCompliance typology Mintzberg’s management rolesCore competencies The neurotic organizationCore quadrants Nolan’s IT growth stagesCovey’s seven habits of highly effective people Overhead value analysisCustomer marketing and relationship management Parenting advantageThe Deming cycle The purposive change modelThe EFQM model Risk reward analysisEisenhower’s effective time management Scenario planning (Shell)EVA – economic value added Schools of strategy synthesisContents The seven forces modelThe fifth discipline Sociotechnical organizationFour competencies of the learning organization SWOT analysisGeneric competitive strategies Value-based managementThe gods of management The value chainGreiner’s growth model Value disciplines
  • 6. Adizes’ PAEI management roles Hofstede’s cultural dimensionsAnsoff’s product/market grid Just-in-timeThe balanced scorecard KaizenThe BCG matrix Kay’s distinctive capabilitiesBelbin’s team roles Kotter’s eight phases of changeBenchmarking Kraljic’s purchasing modelThe Berenschot project management model Levers of controlBusiness process redesign MABA analyisThe capability maturity model The Malcolm Baldrige AwardChange quadrants The marketing mixThe chaos model MaslowCompeting values of organizational effectiveness The 7-S frameworkCompetitive analysis: Porter’s five forces Mintzberg’s configurationsCompliance typology Mintzberg’s management rolesCore competencies The neurotic organizationCore quadrants Nolan’s IT growth stagesCovey’s seven habits of highly effective people Overhead value analysisCustomer marketing and relationship management Parenting advantageThe Deming cycle The purposive change modelThe EFQM model Risk reward analysisEisenhower’s effective time management Scenario planning (Shell)EVA – economic value added Schools of strategy synthesisContents The seven forces modelThe fifth discipline Sociotechnical organizationFour competencies of the learning organization SWOT analysisGeneric competitive strategies Value-based managementThe gods of management The value chainGreiner’s growth model Value disciplines
  • 7. Adizes’ PAEI management roles Hofstede’s cultural dimensionsAnsoff’s product/market grid Just-in-timeThe balanced scorecard KaizenThe BCG matrix Kay’s distinctive capabilitiesBelbin’s team roles Kotter’s eight phases of changeBenchmarking Kraljic’s purchasing modelThe Berenschot project management model Levers of controlBusiness process redesign MABA analyisThe capability maturity model The Malcolm Baldrige AwardChange quadrants The marketing mixThe chaos model MaslowCompeting values of organizational effectiveness The 7-S frameworkCompetitive analysis: Porter’s five forces Mintzberg’s configurationsCompliance typology Mintzberg’s management rolesCore competencies The neurotic organizationCore quadrants Nolan’s IT growth stagesCovey’s seven habits of highly effective people Overhead value analysisCustomer marketing and relationship management Parenting advantageThe Deming cycle The purposive change modelThe EFQM model Risk reward analysisEisenhower’s effective time management Scenario planning (Shell)EVA – economic value added Schools of strategy synthesisContents The seven forces modelThe fifth discipline Sociotechnical organizationFour competencies of the learning organization SWOT analysisGeneric competitive strategies Value-based managementThe gods of management The value chainGreiner’s growth model Value disciplines
  • 8. Adizes’ PAEI management roles Hofstede’s cultural dimensionsAnsoff’s product/market grid Just-in-timeThe balanced scorecard KaizenThe BCG matrix Kay’s distinctive capabilitiesBelbin’s team roles Kotter’s eight phases of changeBenchmarking Kraljic’s purchasing modelThe Berenschot project management model Levers of controlBusiness process redesign MABA analyisThe capability maturity model The Malcolm Baldrige AwardChange quadrants The marketing mixThe chaos model MaslowCompeting values of organizational effectiveness The 7-S frameworkCompetitive analysis: Porter’s five forces Mintzberg’s configurationsCompliance typology Mintzberg’s management rolesCore competencies The neurotic organizationCore quadrants Nolan’s IT growth stagesCovey’s seven habits of highly effective people Overhead value analysisCustomer marketing and relationship management Parenting advantageThe Deming cycle The purposive change modelThe EFQM model Risk reward analysisEisenhower’s effective time management Scenario planning (Shell)EVA – economic value added Schools of strategy synthesisContents The seven forces modelThe fifth discipline Sociotechnical organizationFour competencies of the learning organization SWOT analysisGeneric competitive strategies Value-based managementThe gods of management The value chainGreiner’s growth model Value disciplines
  • 9. describing a company’s business model tomorrow’s organization. today. CUSTOMER CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP OFFER TARGET explains the relationships a CUSTOMER VALUE company establishes with its customers PROPOSITION describes the customers a company wants to offer value to gives an overall view of DISTRIBUTION a companys bundle of CHANNEL products and services describes the channels to communicate and get in touch with customers
  • 10. describing a company’s business model tomorrow’s organization. today. CUSTOMER CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP OFFER TARGET explains the relationships a CUSTOMER VALUE company establishes with its customers PROPOSITION describes the customers a company wants to offer value to gives an overall view of DISTRIBUTION a companys bundle of CHANNEL products and services describes the channels to communicate and get in touch with customers describes the revenue FINANCE REVENUE streams through which STREAMS money is earned
  • 11. describing a company’s business model tomorrow’s organization. today. CUSTOMER CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP OFFER TARGET explains the relationships a CUSTOMER VALUE company establishes with its customers PROPOSITION describes the customers a company wants to offer value to gives an overall view of DISTRIBUTION a companys bundle of CHANNEL products and services describes the channels to communicate and get in touch with customerssums up the monetary describes the revenueconsequences to run a COST FINANCE REVENUE streams through which business model STRUCTURE STREAMS money is earned
  • 12. describing a company’s business model tomorrow’s organization. today.INFRASTRUCTURE PARTNER CUSTOMER CUSTOMER NETWORK RELATIONSHIP OFFER CORE TARGET portrays the network of explains the CAPABILITIES cooperative relationships a CUSTOMER agreements with other VALUE company establishes companies with its customersoutlines the capabilities PROPOSITION describes the required to run a customers a company companys business wants to offer value to model DISTRIBUTION VALUE gives an overall view of CONFIGURATION a companys bundle of CHANNEL products and services describes the channels describes the to communicate and arrangement of get in touch with activities and resources customerssums up the monetary describes the revenueconsequences to run a COST FINANCE REVENUE streams through which business model STRUCTURE STREAMS money is earned
  • 13. 1. Understand Your Current Business Model• Customer value proposition. The model helps customers perform a specific “job” that alternative offerings don’t address.Example: MinuteClinics enable people to visit a doctor’s office without appointmentsby making nurse practitioners available to treat minor health issues.
  • 14. 1. Understand Your Current Business Model• Customer value proposition. The model helps customers perform a specific “job” that alternative offerings don’t address.Example: MinuteClinics enable people to visit a doctor’s office without appointmentsby making nurse practitioners available to treat minor health issues.• Profit formula. The model generates value for your company through factors such as revenue model, cost structure, margins, and inventory turnover.Example: The Tata Group’s inexpensive car, the Nano, is profitable because thecompany has reduced many cost structure elements, accepted lower-than-standardgross margins, and sold the Nano in large volumes to its target market: first-time carbuyers in emerging markets.
  • 15. 1. Understand Your Current Business Model• Customer value proposition. The model helps customers perform a specific “job” that alternative offerings don’t address.Example: MinuteClinics enable people to visit a doctor’s office without appointmentsby making nurse practitioners available to treat minor health issues.• Profit formula. The model generates value for your company through factors such as revenue model, cost structure, margins, and inventory turnover.Example: The Tata Group’s inexpensive car, the Nano, is profitable because thecompany has reduced many cost structure elements, accepted lower-than-standardgross margins, and sold the Nano in large volumes to its target market: first-time carbuyers in emerging markets.• Key resources and processes. Your company has the people, technology, products, facilities, equipment, and brand required to deliver the value proposition to your targeted customers. And it has processes (training, manufacturing, service) to leverage those resources.Example: For Tata Motors to fulfill the requirements of the Nano’s profit formula, ithad to reconceive how a car is designed, manufactured, and distributed. It redefinedits supplier strategy, choosing to outsource a remarkable 85% of the Nano’scomponents and to use nearly 60% fewer vendors than normal to reduce transactioncosts.
  • 16. 2. Identify When a New Model May Be Needed
  • 17. We are living in the world where onebusiness should benchmark vs. a business with similar business model, rather than similar company in the same industry