Technologyinthe classroom

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Technologyinthe classroom

  1. 1. Technology in the Classroom<br />Technology in the Classroom<br />
  2. 2. Did you know…<br /><ul><li>Today's average consumers wear more computing power on their wrists than existed in the entire world before 1961.
  3. 3. Prichett, Price. (1994) The Employee Handbook of New Work Habits for a Radically Changing World:13 Ground Rules for Job Success in the Information Age.</li></li></ul><li>And…<br />Computer power is now 8,000 times less expensive than it was 30 years ago.<br />Prichett, Price. (1994) The Employee Handbook of New Work Habits for a Radically Changing World:13 Ground Rules for Job Success in the Information Age.<br />
  4. 4. In addition…<br />If we had similar progress in automotive technology, today you could buy a Lexus for about $2. It would travel at the speed of sound, and go about 600 miles on a thimble of gas.<br /> Prichett, Price. (1994) The Employee Handbook of New Work Habits for a Radically Changing World:13 Ground Rules for Job Success in the Information Age.<br />
  5. 5. Can you believe…<br />There has been more information produced in the last 30 years than during the previous 5000.<br />Prichett, Price. (1994) The Employee Handbook of New Work Habits for a Radically Changing World:13 Ground Rules for Job Success in the Information Age.<br />
  6. 6. Amazingly enough…<br />A weekday edition of The New York Times contains more information than the average person was likely to come across in a lifetime during 17th-century England.<br />Prichett, Price. (1994) The Employee Handbook of New Work Habits for a Radically Changing World:13 Ground Rules for Job Success in the Information Age.<br />
  7. 7. “A bargain is struck in which technology giveth and technology taketh away. The wise know this well, and are rarely impressed by dramatic technological changes, and never overjoyed.<br />Postman, Neil. (1993) Technopoly.<br />
  8. 8. To a man with a pencil, everything looks like a list. To a man with a camera, everything looks like an image.To a teacher with a computer, everything looks like a PowerPoint presentation<br />Postman, Neil. (1993) Technopoly.<br />
  9. 9. What we need to consider about the computer has nothing to do with its efficiency as a teaching tool. We need to know in what ways it is altering our conception of learning.<br />Postman, Neil. (1993) Technopoly.<br />
  10. 10. The purpose of technology is to facilitate learning, and if a teacher begins with this end in mind technology itself should tend to disappear, not dominate.<br />
  11. 11. Myth #1: Putting computers into schools will directly improve learning; more computers will result in greater improvements.<br />
  12. 12. Myth #2: There are agreed-upon goals and "best practices" that define how computers should be used in K-12 classrooms.<br />
  13. 13. Myth #3: Schools are well equipped with the latest technology, teachers are well trained, and adequate technical and professional support is available.<br />
  14. 14. As teachers, the objective of our profession is to facilitate learning.<br />
  15. 15. We should view the computer as one of those tools, a weapon in our arsenal or devices.... that we employ with our students to achieve our objectives.<br />
  16. 16. Don't think about the technology first. Think about what you want to teach first. Then think about how the technology can enhance what it is you are trying to teach.<br />
  17. 17. Part of educating students for the future is equipping them to function within a technology rich environments and to help them overcome any fear, or anxiety they may feel with regard to technology <br />
  18. 18. We've arranged a civilization in which most crucial elements profoundly depend on science and technology.  We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology.  This is a prescription for disaster.  We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.  ~Carl Sagan<br />

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