American Board of Physical Therapy
Residency and Fellowship Education
Evaluative Criteria
Residency and Fellowship Program...
Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 2
DEFINITIONS
The following definitions have been ado...
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didactic and clinical) for physical therapists foll...
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musculoskeletal (orthopaedic) disorders and has com...
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Examples of learning opportunities that are not inc...
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Resident: A licensed physical therapist enrolled in...
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Evaluative Criteria for Credentialing of Clinical R...
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Example: If the Program is within a private practic...
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Example of a Program goal: The Program will provide...
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b) The policies and procedures related to academic...
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The site visit will include discussion with facult...
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(h) Mechanism of appeal, and
(i) Current informati...
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2.0 RESOURCES
INTRODUCTION:
Resources are availabl...
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training was not the examining therapist, however ...
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ORTHOPAEDIC RESIDENCY PROGRAMS, USE THIS FORM
Name...
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ORTHOPAEDIC MANUAL PHYSICAL THERAPY FELLOWSHIP PRO...
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SPORTS RESIDENCY AND FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS, USE THIS...
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necessary changes. Provide the average number of h...
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The Program has an adequate number of didactic and...
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Copy this Form as needed and complete one Form for...
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2.3.1 The umbrella organization and the Program pr...
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Residents or fellows-in-training will be interview...
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3.0 CURRICULUM
INTRODUCTION:
Both the residency an...
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Expansion of applicable portions of a DSP providin...
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these 130 hours. The remaining 20 hours of the 130...
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Evidence 3.1.2.A Utilize the Form below to provide...
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Evidence 3.1.2.B Utilize the Form below to provide...
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Evidence 3.1.2.C Provide an outline or flow chart ...
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Evidence 3.2.1.B Utilize the Form below to provide...
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Evidence 3.2.2 Use the Form below to list the numb...
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4.0 ONGOING EVALUATION
INTRODUCTION:
The Program c...
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substantive changes that occur. For multi-site Pro...
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 Four technique examinations on models and/or pat...
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Interpretive Guideline: Examples of patient report...
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Abptrfe evaluative criteria2013

  1. 1. American Board of Physical Therapy Residency and Fellowship Education Evaluative Criteria Residency and Fellowship Programs Effective January 1, 2013 (Most recent revisions are highlighted in yellow) American Physical Therapy Association 1111 North Fairfax Street Alexandria, VA 22314-1488 resfel.org / 703-706-3152 www.apta.org/Educators/ResidencyFellowship/
  2. 2. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 2 DEFINITIONS The following definitions have been adopted by the American Board of Physical Therapy Residency and Fellowship Education and are intended to minimize misinterpretation of information in this document. ABPTRFE recognizes that individual programs may have different definitions than those identified below; however, for the purposes of the application and any related credentialing activities, the following terms and definitions must be used. Active: Currently enrolled. American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT): The American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists is a voluntary organization of orthopaedic manual physical therapists that serves its members by promoting excellence in orthopaedic manual physical therapy practice, education and research, and collaborates with national and international associations AAOMPT Annual Report Subcommittee: A group of members appointed by the American Board of Physical Therapy Residency and Fellowship Education to meet the monitoring requirements outlined by the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physical Therapists (IFOMPT). American Board of Physical Therapy Residency and Fellowship Education (ABPTRFE): A seven- member Board appointed by the APTA Board of Directors. ABPTRFE determines the requirements with which a residency or fellowship education program must comply in order to be credentialed and amend these requires as appropriate. They provide an efficient and credible system for the evaluation, credentialing, and re- credentialing of physical therapy residency and fellowship education programs while maintaining the policy and procedures for the implementation and evaluation of the credentialing process. American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS): The governing body for certification and recertification of physical therapy clinical specialists. Currently, the ABPTS specialty areas are: Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Physical Therapy, Clinical Electrophysiologic Physical Therapy, Geriatric Physical Therapy, Neurologic Physical Therapy, Orthopaedic Physical Therapy, Pediatric Physical Therapy, Sports Physical Therapy, and Women’s Health Physical Therapy. American Physical Therapy Association (APTA): A national professional association representing more than 80,000 members. APTA’s goal is to foster advancements in physical therapy practice, research, and education. Analysis of Practice: A systematic process which utilizes a recognized group of subject matter experts and consultants to describe the essential knowledge, skills, and responsibilities of a competent clinician in a specified area of clinical practice using a methodology as acceptable by ABPTRFE. It is recommended that a group seeking to establish a new defined area of practice notify ABPTRFE prior to completion of an analysis of practice to ensure that this new defined area of practice is suitable for development. Clinical Fellowship Program: A postprofessional planned learning experience in a focused advanced area of clinical practice. Similar to the medical model, a clinical fellowship is a structured educational experience (both didactic and clinical) for physical therapists which combines opportunities for ongoing clinical mentoring with a theoretical basis for advanced practice and scientific inquiry in a defined area of sub-specialization beyond that of a defined specialty area of clinical practice. A fellowship candidate has either completed a residency program in a related specialty area or is a board-certified specialist in the related area of specialty. Fellowship training is not appropriate for new physical therapy graduates. Clinical Residency Program: A postprofessional planned learning experience in a focused area of clinical practice. Similar to the medical model, a clinical residency program is a structured educational experience (both
  3. 3. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 3 didactic and clinical) for physical therapists following entry-level education and licensure that is designed to significantly advance the physical therapist’s knowledge, skills, and attributes in a specific area of clinical practice (i.e. Cardiovascular/Pulmonary, Orthopedics, Sports, Pediatrics, etc). It combines opportunities for ongoing clinical mentoring, with a theoretical basis for advanced practice and scientific inquiry based on a Description of Specialty Practice (see definition below) or valid analysis of practice for that specific area of clinical practice. When board certification exists through ABPTS for that specialty, the residency training prepares the physical therapist to pass the certification examination following graduation. A residency candidate must be licensed as a physical therapist in the State where the program is located/clinical training will occur prior to entry into the program. Neither 'clinical residency' nor 'clinical fellowship' is synonymous with the terms ‘clinical internship.' Credentialing: A voluntary process used to evaluate, enhance, and publicly recognize quality in education. The Program, through its faculty, seek independent judgment by its peers regarding the Program’s compliance with a set of standards and criteria that have been accepted by the profession, as well as the Program’s ability to achieve the stated mission and goals. The American Physical Therapy Association awards the credential status. Curriculum: A plan for learning, designed by the faculty and resident/fellow-in-training, to achieve the explicit goals of the Program and the individual resident or fellow-in-training. Describe: To give account of, depict, or trace the outline of, in words. Description of Advanced Specialty Practice: A document published by AAOMPT that identifies the clinical knowledge, judgment and professional behaviors of a physical therapist who has achieved an advanced level of practice through orthopaedic manual physical therapy fellowship education, post-professional degree work, and/or relevant clinical experience and course work. The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to facilitate changes in practice and education, to the benefit of patients/clients. This document is used by ABPTRFE as the basis for assessment of orthopaedic manual physical therapy fellowship programs. Description of Specialty Practice (DSP): Formerly called, Description of Advanced Clinical Practice (DACP), the published results of a practice analysis. Each of the eight (8) ABPTS-recognized specialty areas has a DSP that provides a blueprint for the content of the specialty examination. This publication also provides an outline of the content that can be used as the basis for a Program's curriculum; however, the fellowship curriculum must extend beyond the DSP as it is intended to provide advanced clinical competency in a subspecialty. This publication also can provide a framework for a clinical competency evaluation tool to use in assessing the clinical skills of the residents or fellows-in-training (see “Analysis of Practice”). Document: Evidence or information to support a claim. Effective Date: A date, to be determined by ABPTRFE, for each ABPTRFE decision reached. Faculty of Residency or Fellowship Program: Physical therapists and non-physical therapists who have received a formal assignment to regularly participate as instructors in the didactic and clinical education, curriculum development and review, and/or assessment of residents or fellows-in-training enrolled in a Program. Faculty members must have expertise in their area of clinical practice and teaching responsibility, effective teaching and evaluative skills, and a record of involvement in scholarly and professional activities. See definition for definition for guest lecturer below. Fellow-in-training: A licensed physical therapist enrolled in a fellowship Program credentialed by ABPTRFE who has completed the requirements for eligibility for board certification in the related area of specialty. Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists (FAAOMPT): A physical therapist who has demonstrated advanced clinical, analytical, and hands-on skills in the treatment of
  4. 4. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 4 musculoskeletal (orthopaedic) disorders and has completed a credentialed fellowship program in orthopaedic manual physical therapy or demonstrated the equivalent level of competence by successfully passing a portfolio review process and oral/practical examination. Formative Evaluation: Evaluation methods used in providing feedback to learners during the learning experience to promote learning and to predict final evaluation results. Goal: Goals are developed from mission statements and summarize the development, administrative, or other major accomplishments/outcomes the organization/Program hopes to achieve to fulfill its mission. Goals can be short or long-term, usually set for 1-3 year time frame, and are evaluated annually. Goals should be written to be “SMART” (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Reviewable, and Trackable). Example: The Program will prepare graduates to serve as primary care providers in the area of specialization. Guest Lecturer: An individual who provides either didactic or clinical instruction in a residency/fellowship program on an infrequent basis. This individual has not been formally appointed to the faculty of the program. Inactive: On leave or not on site as an active student. Internship: A clinical education experience that is part of the requirements for graduation from a physical therapist professional education program (degree could be awarded before, during, or after the internship). Live Patient Examination: A method of evaluating a resident’s/fellow’s-in-training skills in patient/client management during a live patient/client encounter. The live patient examination is performed by the program faculty in-person during the patient/client encounter and cannot be a simulated patient encounter. Mentor: A practitioner with advanced knowledge, skills, and clinical judgments of a clinical specialist who provides instruction to a resident or fellow-in-training in patient/client management, advanced professional behaviors, proficiency in communications, and consultation skills. The mentor may also provide instruction in research, teaching, and/or service. The six functions frequently used to describe the role of a mentor are teacher, sponsor, host and guide, exemplar, and counselor. Mentoring: The required clinical mentoring hours (150 hours for residency; 100 hours for fellowship) includes the time that the resident or fellow-in-training spends with the physical therapist mentor in patient/client management, including examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, and outcome; and discussion specific to patient/client management. Mentoring is provided at a post-licensure level of specialty practice (for residents) or subspecialty practice (for fellows-in-training) with emphasis on the development of advanced clinical reasoning skills. The resident/fellow-in-training will be the primary patient/client care provider for a minimum of 100 hours of the 150 required mentoring hours for a residency and for a minimum of 50 of the 100 required mentoring hours for a fellowship. For 12 month residency programs, this averages out to 3 hours of mentoring per week and 2 hours per week in fellowship programs. In addition to the minimum hours of mentoring in patient/client management, mentoring should be also provided in areas identified by the Program’s goals and many include practice management, clinical instruction, professional behaviors, ethics, etc. Examples of mentoring that is acceptable for the minimum hour requirements include:  Examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, intervention and outcome measurement when the mentor is the primary provider  Examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, intervention and outcome measurement when the resident/fellow-in-training is the primary provider (at least 100 hours required for residency and 50 hours for fellowship programs)  Discussion about individual patient/client management – with or without the patient present
  5. 5. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 5 Examples of learning opportunities that are not included in the minimum required hours of mentoring include:  Loosely or unsupervised patient/client management (resident/fellow-in-training and mentor treating separate patients next to each other/in the same room)  Physician or other health care provider observation  Grand rounds  Observation of other physical therapists during patient/client management  Clinical shadowing Mentoring is not the same as providing clinical instruction to the entry-level physical therapist student. Mentoring is preplanned to meet specific educational objectives and requires the advanced knowledge, skills, and clinical judgments of a clinical specialist. In addition to teaching advanced clinical skills and decision making, the mentor also facilitates the development of advanced professional behaviors, proficiency in communications, and consultation skills. Please refer to the resource manual for additional information and resources regarding mentoring. For orthopaedic manual physical therapy fellowship programs, mentored clinical practice as required in the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapists (IFOMPT) Educational Standards is the examination and management of patients by the fellow-in-training under the mentorship of a faculty mentor who is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists. Mission Statement: The mission statement is the philosophical expression of why the organization exists and what it hopes to accomplish. It is normally succinct containing just a few sentences that -communicate the essence of the organization/program to its stakeholders and the public. Example: The Program’s mission is “to prepare physical therapists with advanced knowledge and skills in orthopedic physical therapy integrated with a foundation in the basic and applied sciences and scientific inquiry.” Multi-Facility Program: A program that has more than one affiliated facility for residents/fellows-in-training AND each resident/fellow-in-training rotates to EVERY facility over the course of the program. Multi-Site Program: A program that has more than one affiliated facility for residents/fellows-in-training and each resident/fellow-in-training completes their training at a particular facility(ies) rather than rotating to every facility during the course of the program. Objective: Objectives describe the essential activities that need to be completed to achieve each goal and also need to be written to be “SMART” (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Reviewable, and Trackable). Objectives may be identified as activities that take 1, 2, or 3+ years to accomplish and are usually instrumental in planning for the program. Example: Qualified applicants will be recruited. Performance Outcome: Statements of measurable behaviors reflective of an analysis of practice. Practice Analysis: A systematic plan used by ABPTS to study professional practice behaviors, skills and knowledge that comprise the practice of a specialist. The purpose of the study is to collect data that will reliably and accurately describe what specialist practitioners do and what they know that enables them to do their work. Practice Outcomes/Performance Outcomes: Measurable knowledge, skills, or behaviors that indicate the resident or fellow-in-training has attained competency in a practice domain. Program Director or Coordinator: See “Residency or Fellowship Program Director or Coordinator.” Program Objectives: Written statements that describe what participants will know, or be able to do as a result of a Program. Educational objective should be written in measurable terms, observable, and specify one action the participant will take to demonstrate that he/she has accomplished the outcome.
  6. 6. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 6 Resident: A licensed physical therapist enrolled in a residency program. Residency or Fellowship Program Director/Coordinator: An individual that has administrative (including financial, clinical, and educational) responsibility for the Program. The program director does not have to be a physical therapist, however a physical therapist must be present on some level of program administration and actively involved in all aspects of the program. Specialization: A process established by APTA to recognize individuals certified in an area of advanced clinical practice identified by ABPTS (see “American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties”). Standards: A criterion; a degree or level of requirement, excellence, or attainment; a rule or test on which a judgment or decision can be based. Subspecialty: A clinical practice area within a recognized specialty area (i.e. Neonatal Physical Therapy is a subspecialty of Pediatric Physical Therapy), or, a portion of a recognized specialty area (i.e. Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy is a subspecialty of Orthopaedic Physical Therapy). A basis for a fellowship program. Summative Evaluation: Evaluation methods used to summarize performance at the end of the learning experience to determine success and to set standards for formative evaluation methods. Support Staff: Employees of the Program, facility, or umbrella organization (other than the faculty) who are responsible for some aspect of the administration and/or operation of the Program or facility. Umbrella Organization: An organization or foundation, especially one dedicated to health care, public service, or education. The larger corporation or organization that most directly influences the Program. Written Examination: An method of evaluating resident/fellow-in-training knowledge within a content area of the specialty or subspecialty. The written examination should cover all aspects of the corresponding DSP, DASP, or practice analysis relevant to that program. This examination may be performed in a take home format.
  7. 7. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 7 Evaluative Criteria for Credentialing of Clinical Residency and Fellowship Programs for Physical Therapists (Adopted and effective 10/26/2010; revised 07/12) The “Evaluative Criteria for Credentialing of Residency or Fellowship Programs for Physical Therapists” is divided into four sections, each of which has an introduction, evaluative criterion for credentialing, and a description of the evidence necessary to demonstrate compliance with the requirements. At times, Interpretive Guidelines are provided to further describe, or to provide examples, of acceptable methods to meet ABPTRFE criterion. The four sections of evaluative criteria are: 1) Organization 2) Resources 3) Curriculum 4) Ongoing Evaluation ABPTRFE expects that Programs will comply with the intent of each criterion and supply evidence as indicated to demonstrate compliance. The interpretative guidelines included with select requirements are provided to clarify the intent of the criterion. ABPTRFE seeks to credential those Programs recognized to be in substantial compliance with the evaluative criteria. INTRODUCTION: The goal of all post-professional residency and fellowship programs ("Programs") is to produce physical therapists who demonstrate superior post-professional skills and advanced knowledge in all areas of physical therapy including educational techniques, research methodology, clinical skills, and administrative practices. 1.0 ORGANIZATION Residency or Fellowship Umbrella Organization INTRODUCTION: The settings in which residencies or fellowships occur are those that support excellence in practice and dedication to physical therapy services provided to all types of consumers. 1.1 Umbrella Organization 1.1.1 Mission and Goals The umbrella organization of the Program has a published statement of its mission and goals, demonstrates ethical conduct, practices responsible fiscal management, and has a system for evaluating itself. 1.1.1 The umbrella organization of the Program has a set of realistic goals consistent with its mission statement, which sets forth the umbrella organization’s intentions, including a consideration of resources, programs, processes, and outcomes. Evidence 1.1.1 Provide the statement of mission and goals of the umbrella organization that most directly influences the Program.
  8. 8. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 8 Example: If the Program is within a private practice, hospital, HMO or part of a health system, use mission and goals of the clinical facility. If the applicant is a university, use the mission and goals of the department or entity most closely associated with the Program. NOTE: The Residency/Fellowship Program Agreement requires compliance with APTA’s policies and positions. The Program may not place residents/fellows-in-training in a clinical education experience where the clinic is in a referral for profit situation, that is, one in which a referring physician derives a financial benefit from the physical therapy services provided to the person who is referred. 1.1.2 The umbrella organization has a system for evaluating itself as related to its mission and goals. Evidence 1.1.2 Describe the umbrella organization’s ongoing methods used to evaluate the effectiveness of the umbrella organization’s performance. Include evidence of any external agency accreditations (e.g., JC, CARF, Medicare provider or provider network standards, CAPTE or another educational accreditation organization if applicable). 1.2 Residency or Fellowship Program 1.2.1 Mission, Goals, and Objectives The Program has a published statement of its mission, goals, and objectives and a system for evaluating the effectiveness of its program. 1.2.1 The Program has a mission statement, goals, and objectives that reflect the area of emphasis of the specific residency/fellowship program that are also compatible with the umbrella organization’s mission statement. The mission statement addresses the performance outcomes of the Program, and the scope of practice for the area of clinical practice. Interpretive Guideline: Performance outcomes under 4.1.1 should be compatible with the Program’s mission statement, goals, and objectives. (See Glossary for description of mission, goals, and objectives.) Residency or Fellowship Program Evidence 1.2.1.A Provide the Program’s mission statement, goals and objectives. Multi-site Programs must include at least one goal and corresponding objectives addressing consistency of program delivery in all settings. The goals of the Program are to: 1. Goal: Objectives: a. b. c. *add additional goals/objectives as needed Interpretive Guideline: See the glossary for definitions of mission, goals, and objectives and the Application Resource Manual for examples from credentialed residency and fellowship programs.
  9. 9. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 9 Example of a Program goal: The Program will provide the necessary content and clinical experiences to prepare the resident for successful completion of the ABPTS specialist certification examination.  Note that program goals should be written according to what the Program will do, not what the resident/fellow-in-training will do. Example of a Program objective: The Program faculty will update the program curriculum semi-annually to assure the content is consistent with current evidence.  The objective is also written according to what the Program will do, not what the resident/fellow-in- training will do. For example, the resident/fellow-in-training will demonstrate evidence-based knowledge and practice is an objective for the resident/fellow-in-training, not the Program. Goals that describe what the resident/fellow-in-training or graduate will do are not Program goals. Evidence 1.2.1.B Describe how the Program’s mission statement, goals, and objectives are consistent with one another. Evidence 1.2.1.C Describe how the Program’s mission, goals, and objectives are consistent with the mission of the umbrella organization. The site visit will include assessment of the compatibility of the Program’s mission statement with that of the umbrella organization. Evidence 1.2.1.D Provide the resident/fellow-in-training goals with corresponding objectives. The goals of the resident/fellow-in-training are to: 1. 1. Goal: Objectives: a. b. c. *add additional goals/objectives as needed Interpretive Guidelines: Example of a resident goal: The resident will obtain the knowledge and skills of a board certified specialist. Example of a resident objective: The resident will pass the ABPTS clinical specialist examination. Program Policies & Procedures 1.2.2 The Program has formal policies and procedures for the resident/fellow-in-training including but not limited to: 1) Patient/Client Care Issues: a) A policy on confidentiality safeguards for records and personal information; b) A policy and procedure on the protection of human subjects, consistent with the type of research being conducted by the resident or fellow-in-training; c) A policy on safety regulations, and evidence of its annual review. 2) Administrative and Human Resource Issues: a) The policies and procedures related to admission to the residency/fellowship program including the use of transfer credits;
  10. 10. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 10 b) The policies and procedures related to academic retention within the residency/fellowship program including the requirements (i.e. passing criteria on examinations, timelines, etc) for the resident/fellow-in-training to maintain active status within the program through graduation; c) A policy and procedure related to academic remediation of the resident/fellow- in-training and the criteria for dismissal from the program if remediation efforts are unsuccessful; d) Nondiscriminatory policies and procedures for the recruitment, admission, retention, and dismissal of students or employees; e) A grievance policy or mechanism of appeal that ensures due process; f) A probationary period policy, if applicable; g) A termination policy and procedure that includes termination of the resident or fellow-in-training that becomes ineligible to practice (e.g. resident or fellow-in- training cannot obtain licensure in the state or looses their temporary licensure and becomes ineligible to practice) and includes the employment status of a resident/fellow-in-training should termination from the program occur; h) A statement regarding how the resident/fellow-in-training obtains malpractice and health insurance coverage; i) ABPTRFE’s Grievance Policy. Residents and fellows-in-training enrolled in a clinical residency or fellowship Program must be licensed as a physical therapist in the state(s) where the clinical training for the Program will occur prior to commencing the Program. Temporary licensure in the state that clinical training will occur during the program is acceptable for starting a residency/fellowship program, however the program must have a policy in place that outlines the termination policy should the resident/fellow-in-training looses his/her temporary licensure and becomes ineligible to practice. Admission criteria should be reflective of the definition of a resident or fellow-in-training. To be eligible to apply for credentialing as a clinical residency or fellowship program for physical therapists, the program must have a respective resident/fellow-in-training enrolled in the program at the time of application, whose background must include licensure as a physical therapist. In addition, for fellowship programs specifically, the enrolled fellow-in-training must possess specialist certification, completion of a residency in a related specialty area, or substantial clinical experience in a related specialty area. The Program ensures that residents or fellows-in-training will have malpractice coverage while on clinical assignment and will encourage residents or fellows-in- training to have health insurance, which may or may not be provided through the umbrella organization at resident or fellow-in-training rates. The Program shall establish methods to identify and remedy unsatisfactory clinical or academic performance, and shall require that such remediation methods are distributed to, and acknowledged in writing by the resident or fellow-in-training. Interpretive Guideline: The timing of the evaluation should allow sufficient opportunity for remediation when necessary. Remediation methods may include requiring that the resident or fellow-in-training spend additional hours in a clinic or complete additional didactic assignments to facilitate achievement of the stated goals. Part of the remediation process is clearly established criteria for dismissal from the Program
  11. 11. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 11 The site visit will include discussion with faculty and staff of how well policies and procedures are communicated, how often they are revised and updated, and how well they meet their needs. For those residency/fellowship programs that allow transfer credits for didactic coursework previously taken with the umbrella organization to resident/fellow-in- training upon entrance into the program, the following policies must be followed:  The prior coursework taken must have been taken at the umbrella organization for the residency/fellowship program within the last 2 years from starting the residency/fellowship program and that previous coursework must match EXACTLY with what is currently being taught in the residency/fellowship program. Any changes to course content prevents a resident/fellow from receiving past credit.  A maximum of 10 hours of credit may be given towards the 1500/1000 residency/fellowship hours respectively that are required for credentialed programs. Sports Physical Therapy Residency Additional Admission Requirement: The resident must possess one of the following: a current ATC designation, a current license as an EMT, or certification as an Emergency Medical Responder PRIOR to commencing the Program. Fellowship Admission Requirement: Participants in fellowship programs must be licensed as a physical therapist and possess one or both of the following qualifications: 1) specialist certification in the related area of specialty, 2) completion of a residency in a related specialty area, and/or 3) demonstrable clinical skills within a particular specialty area. Evidence 1.2.2 Provide the Program’s policies and procedures for the resident/fellow-in-training handbook and Program and/or umbrella organization’s policy and procedures manual(s) for all items listed in the American Board of Physical Therapy Residency & Fellowship Education “Evaluative Criteria for Credentialing Residency/Fellowship Programs for Physical Therapists”. Please do not send the organization’s entire policy and procedures manual. Resident/Fellow-in-training Policies and Procedures 1.2.3 Resident/Fellow-in-training Recruitment and Written Contract/Agreement/Letter of Appointment Evidence 1.2.3.1 Provide the recruitment materials (not a link to the Program’s website). 1.2.3.2 The Program shall provide the resident or fellow-in-training a written contract/agreement/ letter of appointment. The contract/agreement/letter of appointment must include reference to the following items: (a) Duties of the resident or fellow-in-training, (b) Duration of the agreement including grounds for termination, (c) Hours of work, (d) Fringe benefits (e.g., meals, uniforms, vacation policy, sick leave policy, housing provisions, and payment of dues for membership in selected professional organizations), (e) Health, hospital, and disability insurance benefits, (g) Probationary period, if applicable,
  12. 12. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 12 (h) Mechanism of appeal, and (i) Current information about any financial aid or stipends provided through the umbrella organization or Program. If these items are not included within the contract/agreement/letter of appointment, reference must be made that they are included in the Program’s policy and procedures manual and this manual is provided to the resident with the contract/agreement/letter of appointment. Evidence 1.2.3.2 Provide a copy of a blank contract or agreement or letter of appointment. 1.2.3.3 The Program maintains a record of current participants in the Program. Evidence 1.2.3.3 Utilize the Form below to provide the name, physical therapy license number and state, and status (active or inactive) for all currently enrolled residents or fellows-in-training. Add additional rows as needed. Interpretive Guideline: Program must have a resident or fellow-in-training enrolled in the program at the time of application. RESIDENT/FELLOW-IN- TRAINING NAME EMAIL ADDRESS LICENSE # (with state) START DATE (MONTH/YEAR) STATUS Active Full Time Active Part-Time Inactive Active Full Time Active Part-Time Inactive Active Full Time Active Part-Time Inactive Active Full Time Active Part-Time Inactive Active Full Time Active Part-Time Inactive Active Full Time Active Part-Time Inactive Active Full Time Active Part-Time Inactive Active Full Time Active Part-Time Inactive Active Full Time Active Part-Time Inactive Active Full Time Active Part-Time Inactive Active Full Time Active Part-Time Inactive
  13. 13. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 13 2.0 RESOURCES INTRODUCTION: Resources are available in sufficient quantity and quality to enable the residency or fellowship to accomplish its goals. These resources may include adequate patient/client population, faculty, resident or fellow-in-training services, staff, finances, access to publications, capital equipment, materials, and facilities. 2.1 Patient/Client Population 2.1.1 The Program has a patient/client population that is sufficient in number and variety to meet the educational purposes, goals, and objectives of the Program. Residency and fellowship programs must provide sufficient mentored clinical practice experiences for the most common diagnoses or impairments identified in the Description of Specialty Practice (DSP), the Description of Advanced Specialty Practice (DASP), or practice analysis. Other learning experiences (observation, patient rounds, surgical observation, etc.) may supply sufficient exposure to less commonly encountered practice elements. Clinical Residencies: If the curriculum of the residency program is in an area or portion of an area where American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS) specialist certification exists, the patient/client population must reflect the current ABPTS DSP. If the curriculum of the residency program is not in an area where ABPTS specialist certification exists, the patient/client population must be consistent with the findings of a reliable and valid practice analysis. Clinical Fellowships: Because the curriculum of a fellowship is designed to advance the physical therapist’s clinical skills beyond that of the residency, the patient/client population must be consistent with the findings of a reliable and valid practice analysis for the subspecialty area. Patient/Client Population Evidence 2.1.1.A Using the Form below, summarize the number of patients/clients (not number of visits) by diagnostic categories evaluated, treated, and/or managed by the resident/fellow-in-training over the last year as part of the residency or fellowship program. Do not provide data on patient/clients seen by all staff in the clinic. Copy this form as needed. New Programs provide data since the start date of the resident/fellow-in-training. Categorize the patient/client population in a manner that clearly captures the intent of the DSP/DASP/practice analysis upon which the Program is based (categorize by diagnosis, impairment, body region, and/or practice location, as needed). For orthopaedic residency, sports residency, and orthopaedic manual physical therapy fellowship programs, please use the Form provided. This chart should also provide a summary of the percentage of the total patient/client population represented in this category. Site visit will include review of data sources used to generate summary information. Interpretive Guideline: This form should be completed with patient/client numbers that the resident/fellow-in- training has treated since commencing the Program up until the date the application is submitted. Updated numbers for this form for all currently enrolled residents/fellows-in-training will be reviewed during the site visit. Each patient should be counted once (Ex: If a resident/fellow-in-training sees a patient for a new examination and then again for follow up, that patient should only be counted once. Or, if a resident/fellow-in-
  14. 14. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 14 training was not the examining therapist, however sees the patient/client on a subsequent follow up, that patient/client can be counted at that time.) Name of Resident/Fellow-in-training (Include a separate form for EACH resident/fellow-in-training currently enrolled in the Program) Description of Patients by Diagnostic Group/Impairment Category DIAGNOSTIC GROUP OR CATEGORY NUMBER OF PATIENTS/CLIENTS TREATED BY RESIDENT OR FELLOW-IN- TRAINING AS PART OF THE PROGRAM % OF TOTAL PATIENTS/ CLIENTS TREATED BY RESIDENT OR FELLOW- IN-TRAINING Orthopaedic residency and manual physical therapy fellowships, please use the substitute form below that already has the diagnostic categories listed. Sports residency and fellowship programs, please use the substitute form below that already has the diagnostic categories listed. * Be as descriptive as possible in defining Diagnostic Group/Category. See examples in Application Resource Manual.
  15. 15. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 15 ORTHOPAEDIC RESIDENCY PROGRAMS, USE THIS FORM Name of Resident (Include a separate form for EACH resident currently enrolled in the Program) DIAGNOSTIC GROUP OR CATEGORY NUMBER OF PATIENTS/CLIENTS TREATED BY THE RESIDENT AS PART OF THE PROGRAM % OF TOTAL PATIENTS/ CLIENTS TREATED BY THE RESIDENT THE % INDICATED BELOW ARE PER THE DSP GUIDELINES. PROGRAMS SHOULD BE TARGETING Cranial/Mandibular 5% Cervical Spine 15% Thoracic Spine/Ribs 5% Lumbar Spine 20% Pelvic Girdle/Sacroiliac/Coccyx/ Abdomen 5% Shoulder/Shoulder Girdle 15% Arm/Elbow 5% Wrist/Hand 5% Hip 5% Thigh/Knee 10% Leg/Ankle/Foot 10% Total 100%
  16. 16. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 16 ORTHOPAEDIC MANUAL PHYSICAL THERAPY FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS, USE THIS FORM Name of Fellow-in-training (Include a separate form for EACH fellow-in-training currently enrolled in the Program) DIAGNOSTIC GROUP OR CATEGORY NUMBER OF PATIENTS/CLIENTS TREATED BY THE FELLOW-IN-TRAINING AS PART OF THE PROGRAM % OF TOTAL PATIENTS/ CLIENTS TREATED THE FELLOW-IN-TRAINING Cranial/Mandibular Cervical Spine Thoracic Spine/Ribs Lumbar Spine Pelvic Girdle/Sacroiliac/Coccyx/ Abdomen Shoulder/Shoulder Girdle Arm/Elbow Wrist/Hand Hip Thigh/Knee Leg/Ankle/Foot Total
  17. 17. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 17 SPORTS RESIDENCY AND FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS, USE THIS FORM Name of Resident/Fellow-in-training (Include a separate form for EACH resident/fellow-in-training currently enrolled in the Program) DIAGNOSTIC GROUP NUMBER OF PATIENTS/CLIENTS TREATED BY RESIDENT OR FELLOW-IN- TRAINING AS PART OF THE PROGRAM % OF TOTAL PATIENTS/ CLIENTS TREATED BY RESIDENT OR FELLOW-IN- TRAINING Lumbar Spine Thoracic Spine Cervical Spine Hip/Pelvic Region Knee/Lower Leg Region Ankle Foot Shoulder Elbow Wrist Hand/Thumb TMJ Total % of total clients that are sports physical therapy cases (should be at least 40%) Evidence 2.1.1.B Describe the Program’s plan for providing learning opportunities for all diagnostic category groups/impairments should there be limited patient exposure for any diagnostic category. 2.2 Faculty 2.2.1 The Program has a director or coordinator whose skills and background meet the qualifications of the position description of program director or coordinator. Faculty Evidence 2.2.1.A Provide the program director or coordinator’s job description. Interpretive Guideline: The program director’s job description should include management of the entire residency program, including but not limited to, accessing and managing resources, assuring consistent curricular application across all didactic and clinical sites, assessing program outcomes, and implementing
  18. 18. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 18 necessary changes. Provide the average number of hours per week dedicated to the residency/fellowship Program. Evidence 2.2.1.B Provide the program director or coordinator's abbreviated résumé by completing the chart below. Faculty Name: Academic/Teaching Appointments: Education: Scholarly Activity/Publications: Educational Presentations: Recent Continuing Education Attended: Interpretive Guideline: Do NOT send lengthy curriculum vitae. 2.2.2 The Program has a sufficient number of faculty with demonstrated expertise in the needed areas of academic and clinical practice, including the appropriate credentials, to achieve the mission and goals of the education program. The faculty has the collective qualifications necessary to conduct the activities of the Program. Those qualifications include the following: advanced clinical skills, academic and experiential qualifications, diversity of backgrounds appropriate to meet Program goals, expertise in residency or fellowship development and design, and expertise in Program and resident/fellow-in-training evaluation. The faculty as a unit, including the Program director or coordinator, have the qualifications and experience necessary to achieve the Program goals through effective processes of Program development, design, and evaluation of outcomes. Faculty members must have expertise in their area of clinical practice and teaching responsibility, effective teaching and evaluative skills, and a record of involvement in scholarly and professional activities. Judgment about faculty competence in a curricular area for which a faculty member is responsible is based on: 1) appropriate past and current involvement in specialist certification and/or advanced-degree courses; 2) experience as a clinician; 3) research experience; and 4) previous teaching experience (e.g., classroom, clinical, in-service and/or continuing education, and presentations to, and attendance at, in-service or continuing education courses). When determining teaching effectiveness, multiple sources of data are collected, including evaluations by residents or fellows-in-training.
  19. 19. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 19 The Program has an adequate number of didactic and clinical faculty to allow for: 1) teaching, clinical mentoring, administration, continuing individual counseling, mentoring of residents or fellows-in-training by faculty, and supervision and conduct of clinical research throughout the period of study; 2) faculty involvement in residency or fellowship committee responsibilities; and 3) faculty activities that contribute to individual professional growth and development. The Program has a sufficient number of clinical faculty to ensure that the residents' or fellows’-in-training service delivery tasks and duties are primarily learning-oriented. Educational considerations should take precedence over service delivery and revenue generation. Where the focus of the Program is within an ABPTS specialty area, the Program will have at least one ABPTS-certified faculty member in that area. For multi-site Programs there must be a clinical specialist on site unless the resident/fellow-in-training will be rotating to other sites where there is a clinical specialist. For orthopedic manual physical therapy programs, the Program will have at least one FAAOMPT on faculty. The ABPTS-certified faculty member must be providing some of the mentoring within the clinical practice setting. Clinical Residencies: At least one ABPTS-certified (current) clinician will serve on the faculty of the clinical residency program and be involved in all major areas of the clinical residency program including development of the curriculum, the supervision of clinical experiences, mentoring, and advising of students. At least one full-time faculty member will be ABPTS-certified (current) in the clinical residency program where full- time faculty exist. A sufficient number of ABPTS-certified (current) clinicians must serve on the faculty of clinical residency programs that are composed of part-time faculty. Clinical Fellowships: The same standards apply for the faculty of a clinical fellowship. The faculty must include at least one individual with substantial experience in the subspecialty area, which can be clearly documented. For orthopedic manual physical therapy fellowships, the faculty must include one fellow of AAOMPT. In addition, mentoring in orthopedic manual physical therapy fellowship programs must be performed by a member of AAOMPT. Evidence 2.2.2.A Utilize the Form below for each faculty member that meets the description (full-time or part-time) in the “Evaluative Criteria for Credentialing Residency/Fellowship Programs for Physical Therapists”. Provide names, credentials, title, primary place of employment, including the site where the faculty provides instruction/mentoring, areas of responsibility, recent professional development activities and the number of hours per week dedicated to the residency/fellowship program. If single faculty member, briefly describe the Program’s contingency plan should the faculty member not be able to function in this role. The site visit will include an assessment of the appropriateness of the number and expertise of existing faculty including review of CVs or resumes relative to the number of residents or fellows-in-training and the curriculum.
  20. 20. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 20 Copy this Form as needed and complete one Form for all faculty active in the Program. NAME (with credentials) ABPTS CERTIFICATION/RECERTIFICATON (Designate year certified/Year of latest recertification) TITLE Number of hours per week dedicated to the residency/ fellowship Program: Cardiopulmonary (Cert) (Recert) Clinical Electrophysiology (Cert) (Recert) Geriatric (Cert) (Recert) Neurologic (Cert) (Recert) Orthopaedic (Cert) (Recert) Pediatric (Cert) (Recert) Sports (Cert) (Recert) Women’s Health (Cert) (Recert) OTHER CERTIFICATIONS/ASSOCIATION STATUS Certified Hand Therapist (Cert) (Recert) FAAOMPT or Member of AAOMPT: Yes No Certified Wound Specialist (Cert) (Recert) PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT SITE WHERE FACULTY PROVIDES INSTRUCTION/MENTORING AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY IN PROGRAM RECENT PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES (i.e., continuing education, publications, research, etc.) Evidence 2.2.2.B Describe the qualifications for appointment to the Program’s faculty (didactic and clinical). Interpretive Guideline: Response should be brief and discuss those qualifications as a whole that the program utilizes when making appointments to its faculty. Please do not include individual qualifications for each faculty member listed. 2.2.3 The Program has ongoing faculty development programs. Interpretive Guideline: Ongoing faculty development programs are designed to maintain and improve the effectiveness of each individual associated with the Program and to improve the Program as a whole. Resources for development need not be limited to money and may include such areas as mentoring, sharing of clinical expertise, release time for development activities, and participation in journal clubs. Evidence 2.2.3 Provide a summary of professional development opportunities and resources that allow faculty to maintain and improve their effectiveness as clinicians and educators. Services to Physical Therapists Residents or Fellows-in-training 2.3 Services to Physical Therapist Residents or Fellows-in-training
  21. 21. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 21 2.3.1 The umbrella organization and the Program provide adequate services to the physical therapist resident or fellow-in-training to support successful completion of the Program. 2.3.1.1 When multiple facilities are used, each facility shall be formally linked to the umbrella organization or Program by a document delineating the nature and terms of the relationship. Interpretive Guideline: When the resident's or fellow’s-in-training learning experiences are provided at secondary facilities, the participating facilities indicate their respective commitments either through a memorandum of understanding or a letter from the individual(s) responsible for providing the learning experiences at the secondary facility. The document acknowledges the affiliation and delineates any financial support (including resident/fellow-in- training liability) and educational contributions of the secondary facility. Evidence 2.3.1.1.A Utilize the Form below to list all facilities (didactic and clinical) utilized for resident/fellow-in-training education. NOTE: The Residency/Fellowship Program Agreement requires compliance with APTA’s policies and positions. The Program may not place residents/fellows-in-training in a clinical education experience where the clinic is in a referral for profit situation, that is, one in which a referring physician derives a financial benefit from the physical therapy services provided to the person who is referred. Evidence 2.3.1.1.B Provide letters of agreement for all clinical facilities not owned/operated by the Program’s umbrella organization. Evidence 2.3.1.1.C Describe how the program will ensure uninterrupted, quality didactic and clinical learning for all program participants should any of the program’s resources be suddenly terminated/annulled. 2.3.1.2 The program and/or umbrella organization ensures that residents or fellows-in- training have access to educational advising. Interpretive Guideline: Advising regarding current enrollment, matriculation, remediation, withdrawal, and dismissal policies and procedures are provided. Evidence 2.3.1.2 Describe the availability of, and accessibility to educational advising and counseling. NAME OF FACILITY CONTACT PERSON FACILITY ADDRESS
  22. 22. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 22 Residents or fellows-in-training will be interviewed on site. 2.4 Financial Resources 2.4.1 The Program has the financial support needed to achieve its stated goals. Interpretive Guideline: For the protection of the residents/fellows-in-training in the Program, the umbrella organization demonstrates its support of the Program, in part, by providing sufficient funding resources to sustain the Program over the long term. Financial Resources Evidence 2.4.1.A Describe the Program’s current sources of funding. Evidence 2.4.1.B Describe the Program’s plan to assure funding throughout the period of credentialing. During the site visit, the site team will discuss this information with the Program director or coordinator and may ask to review additional supporting documentation such as revenue and expense reports. 2.5 Educational Resources 2.5.1 The physical therapist resident or fellow-in-training and Program faculty have access to current publications and other materials in appropriate media to support the curriculum. Educational Resources Evidence 2.5.1 Describe the educational resources, including methods of access, available to faculty and residents or fellows-in-training. The site visit will include the site team’s assessment of how well these resources meet the needs of the residents or fellows-in-training and faculty.
  23. 23. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 23 3.0 CURRICULUM INTRODUCTION: Both the residency and fellowship experiences combine opportunities for ongoing mentoring and formal and informal feedback to the physical therapist resident or fellow-in-training, including required written and live patient practical examinations, with a foundation in scientific inquiry, evidence-based practice, and course work designed to provide a theoretical basis for advanced practice. Each Program is based on a well-defined, systematic process for establishing content validity of the curriculum that describes practice in a defined area. Residencies are created in a specialty area; fellowships should have a curriculum based in one or more subspecialty areas. In specialty areas where validated competencies have been identified, the curriculum should be based on those competencies. In addition, the curriculum should be consistent with the most current version of APTA’s Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Specialized and sub specialized Programs must include postprofessional education and training in the scientific principles underlying practice applications. The curriculum sets forth the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values needed to achieve the educational goals and objectives of the Program. The Program has the responsibility to include activities that promote the physical therapist resident's or fellow’s- in-training continued integration of practice, research, and scholarly inquiry, consistent with the Program's mission and philosophy. An evaluation component helps to ensure that the stated goals are being met by the physical therapist resident or fellow-in-training through the curriculum plan. 3.1 Curriculum Development 3.1.1 The Program has a comprehensive curriculum that has been developed from, and is reflective of a validated analysis of practice, or comprehensive needs assessment (non- clinical programs only) and that incorporates concepts of professional behavior and ethics. Clinical Residency: If the curriculum of the residency program is in an area or a portion of an area where American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS) specialist certification exists, the curriculum must reflect the entire spectrum of the current ABPTS Description of Specialty Practice (DSP). If the curriculum of the residency or fellowship program is not in an area where ABPTS specialist certification exists, the curriculum must reflect the use of an analysis of practice using validated process. The validated analysis of practice must be approved by ABPTRFE prior to establishing the Program curriculum. See the definition for “Analysis of Practice” in ABPTRFE Credentialing Handbook for requirements related to conducting an analysis of practice for the purpose of developing a new residency or fellowship practice area. Please note that ABPTRFE approval of an analysis of practice and residency program is not formal recognition of a specialty area as defined by APTA. In addition, ABPTRFE recognition does not guarantee recognition by ABPTS and ABPTS retains its authority to require additional work and documentation should a petition to establish a specialty area be filed with ABPTS. Clinical Fellowship: If the curriculum of the fellowship program is in a portion of an area where ABPTS specialist certification exists, the curriculum must reflect the current ABPTS DSP and also extend beyond the DSP in its scope. That is, the program may establish the fellowship curriculum, including didactic content, competency expectations, and description of patients seen through one of the following two methods: 1) A valid and reliable analysis of practice in the subspecialty area; or 2)
  24. 24. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 24 Expansion of applicable portions of a DSP providing a detailed description of the knowledge, competency expectations, and types of patients seen, including references where appropriate. Orthopedic manual physical therapy fellowships must follow the most recent version of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT’s) Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy Description of Advanced Specialist Practice (DASP). The Program’s curriculum must cover the entire corresponding DSP, DASP, valid analysis of practice, or comprehensive needs assessment for that specialty/subspecialty. When updates are made to the document, programs have 1 year to modify their curriculum to meet the updated document. Curriculum Development Evidence 3.1.1 Identify the year and version of the DSP/DASP, analysis of practice, or comprehensive needs assessment used to develop the curriculum. If the curriculum is not in an ABPTS specialty area, provide a copy of the analysis of practice or a detailed description of the expanded component of a DSP that was used to plan the Program. Interpretive Guideline: The current version of the DSP/DASP, analysis of practice, or comprehensive needs assessment must be used to develop the Program curriculum. During the on-site visit, the way in which concepts of professional behavior and ethics are incorporated into the curriculum will be discussed with faculty and residents or fellows-in-training. 3.1.2. The Program provides a systematic set of learning experiences that addresses the content (knowledge, skills, and behaviors) needed to attain the performance outcomes for the clinical residents or fellows-in-training.  All residents must have a minimum of 150 hours of 1:1 mentoring and 75 hours of didactic instruction over the course of the Program.  All fellows-in-training must have a minimum of 100 hours of 1:1 mentoring and 50 hours of advanced didactic instruction within an area of subspecialty over the course of the Program. The didactic instruction may include a variety of educational opportunities, including but not limited to, case review, didactic classroom instruction, chat room, problem solving sessions, clinical rounds, and other planned educational experiences. Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapy programs must meet the following additional requirements:  A minimum total of 1,000 hours with at least 90% orthopedic case load that includes: o A minimum of 200 hours of theoretical/cognitive and scientific study in OMPT knowledge areas. o A minimum of 160 hours, including 100 hours spinal and 60 hours extremity, practical (lab) instruction in OMPT examination and treatment techniques. o A minimum of 440 hours of clinical practice with an orthopedic manual physical therapist instructor available  A minimum of 130 hours (of the 440 hours) of clinical practice must be under the direct 1:1 clinical mentoring of the instructor in which the fellow-in-training must serve as the primary clinician responsible for the patient/client’s care for 110 of
  25. 25. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 25 these 130 hours. The remaining 20 hours of the 130 hours may be devoted to observation, discussion, and interaction with the mentor on patient/client management. Mentoring should be distributed over the duration of the fellowship. Mentoring must be provided by a member of AAOMPT.  A minimum of 40 hours (within the 440 hours) of interaction with the clinical instructors in non-patient care situations must be included in the curriculum. The focus of these hours should be related to clinical problem solving. Various methods may be employed including small group tutorials and “chat room” discussions between peers and clinical faculty, onsite or phone/web-based technology interaction. Interpretive Guideline: The 200 hours of theoretical/cognitive and scientific study in OMPT knowledge areas can be provided by several methods. One method is providing traditional didactic methods (lecture, discussion, etc). Additional methods can include innovative teaching methods such as interactive discussion boards, interactive shadowing experiences, etc. Sport Physical Therapy Residency Programs must meet the following additional requirements:  A clinic experience that allow for at least 40% sports physical therapy caseload  A minimum of 200 hours of sports physical therapy coverage at athletic venues. Interpretive Guideline: Up to 50 hours of athletic training room experience may be included, and is encouraged, in the 200 hours of venue coverage, however is not required.
  26. 26. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 26 Evidence 3.1.2.A Utilize the Form below to provide the major content areas in the Program's curriculum and their relationship to the DSP/DASP/analysis of practice or comprehensive needs assessment. CONTENT AREA RELATED AREA IN DSP/DASP/Analysis of Practice/Comprehensive Needs Assessment LOCATION IN CURRICULUM (eg, semester, week) DIDACTIC EXPERIENCES CLINICAL EXPERIENCES
  27. 27. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 27 Evidence 3.1.2.B Utilize the Form below to provide an example of a typical weekly schedule for the resident or fellow-in-training. SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM NOON 1:00 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM 5:00 PM 6:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:00 PM 9:00 PM
  28. 28. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 28 Evidence 3.1.2.C Provide an outline or flow chart of the overall sequencing of content in the Program’s curriculum across the entire time period of the residency or fellowship, including both didactic and clinical experiences. Briefly explain the rationale behind the organization and sequencing of the curricular content as well as how the program ensures congruency between the didactic and clinical aspects of the curriculum. Interpretive Guideline: The didactic and clinical portions of the curriculum must complement each other to enhance participant learning. For example, the resident/fellow-in-training should be seeing those patients/clients in clinic with the same diagnostic category that is being instructed during the didactic portion of the curriculum at that time. Evidence 3.1.2.D Provide the course syllabi, including course description, educational objectives, requirements for successful completion, and teaching methods. The on-site visit will include reviewing all teaching materials as well as observation of clinical residents or fellows-in-training engaged in a clinical mentoring learning experience. Observation of a classroom or lab experience is at the discretion of the site visit team. 3.2 Implementation 3.2.1 Residency: The residency program should be completed within a minimum of 1,500 hours, and in no fewer than nine (9) months and no more than 36 months. Programs whose timeframe falls outside of these parameters will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Fellowship: The fellowship program should be completed within a minimum of 1,000 hours, and in no fewer than six (6) months and no more than 36 months. The orthopedic manual physical therapy fellowship should be completed in no fewer than eleven (11) months. Programs whose timeframe falls outside of these parameters will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Implementation Evidence 3.2.1.A Identify the minimum and maximum amount of time allowed for a resident or fellow-in-training to complete the Program. Provide a summary of the amount of time previous residents or fellows-in-training took to complete the Program. Interpretive Guideline: The maximum time allowed for a resident or fellow-in-training to complete the Program must include any time required for remediation by the resident/fellow-in-training, or leave of absences, if applicable.
  29. 29. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 29 Evidence 3.2.1.B Utilize the Form below to provide a list of all residents or fellows-in-training who have graduated in the past three years. Include initiation and completion date, and number of hours required for completion. Explain discrepancies. Name License # Email Address State Date Started (Month/year) Date Ended (Month/year) No. of Hours in Program 3.2.2 The Program must include a variety of instructional methods to include classroom instruction, laboratory instruction, clinical practice, and mentoring to achieve the performance outcomes. The multi-site Program must provide evidence demonstrating that the curriculum is applied consistently at each clinical site. Instructional methods are based on content and learning experiences and may vary according to the resident's or fellow-in-training’s needs. To ensure the safety of patients/clients and the competency of clinicians, a Program must provide clinical mentoring that includes, but is not limited to: • Faculty providing mentoring of residents or fellows-in-training that includes management of patients/clients presenting with critical and/or complex care issues that require further expert consultation or referral. • Residents or fellows-in-training observing faculty providing clinical care.
  30. 30. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 30 Evidence 3.2.2 Use the Form below to list the number of hours dedicated to each instructional method used to achieve the performance outcomes. Provide the average number of one-on-one mentoring hours. For multi-site Programs, a separate form is required for each clinical site. Name of Clinical Site: *Provide a separate form for EACH clinical site Instructional Method Total Hours in Program Classroom Instruction (List all courses) Journal Club Research Activities Home Study Grand Rounds Clinical Mentoring (minimum of 150 hours for residency; 100 hours for fellowship; 130 hours for orthopaedic manual physical therapy fellowships). For non-clinical Programs, please provide a total of mentoring hours provided to the participant over the course of the Program.  1:1 clinical mentoring/instruction from physical therapist clinical faculty while program participant is treating patients (minimum 100 hours for residency; 50 for fellowship; 110 hours for orthopaedic manual physical therapy fellowship)  1:1 patient/client related planning/discussion/review of diagnostic tests, evaluation, plan of care, physical therapist clinical faculty treating patients, etc. Total Mentoring Hours Clinical Practice (mentor accessible onsite) Clinical Observation Athletic Venue Coverage (Sports residency/fellowship Programs only) Other: (Please list) TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM
  31. 31. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 31 4.0 ONGOING EVALUATION INTRODUCTION: The Program conducts ongoing evaluation of the Program goals, faculty, curriculum, and participants. The evaluation process is planned, organized, scheduled, and documented to assure ongoing quality of post-professional specialty and subspecialty education. The performance of the program participant is evaluated initially, on an ongoing basis, and at the conclusion of the Program. Data collected on the evaluation of a program participant is used to further focus the resident's or fellow-in-training’s learning and instruction, as well as to confirm achievement of the residency or fellowship performance outcomes. Data are also collected on the post-graduation performance of the residents or fellow as a whole, in order to evaluate the Program and revise the curriculum. 4.1 Evaluation of the Program 4.1.1 The Program has a system for evaluating its goals (identified in 1.2.1), as related to the mission statement. Evaluation of the Program Evidence 4.1.1 Describe the process for regular and ongoing evaluation of the Program’s goals as stated in 1.2.1.A. Include how often the goals are reviewed, what would trigger a review, who is responsible for the review, etc. 4.1.2 The Program has a system for evaluating its clinical and didactic faculty, which includes assessment of teaching ability, professional activities, clinical expertise, and service. Evidence 4.1.2.A Describe the process for ongoing faculty evaluation. Faculty evaluation plan must include annual observation of a mentoring session by the program director/coordinator for all faculty mentors. Interpretive Guideline: For multi-site programs, videotaping or video conferencing is acceptable for observing a mentoring session by the program director/coordinator of faculty mentors. Evidence 4.1.2.B Provide blank forms utilized in the faculty (clinical and didactic) evaluation process. Samples of completed evaluations will be reviewed onsite (names may be removed). Also, faculty will be interviewed regarding the effectiveness of the evaluation process. 4.1.3 The Program has an ongoing process for periodic review of the curriculum and making appropriate revisions, based on measurable performance outcomes. Evidence 4.1.3.A Describe the ongoing process used to evaluate the Program's curriculum and to make appropriate revisions. Include a description of the mechanisms used for communication (eg, regular meetings, conference calls), those individuals involved in the evaluation process, and how all persons involved in the program (eg, faculty, program participant) are made aware of any
  32. 32. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 32 substantive changes that occur. For multi-site Programs, include the processes for assuring that the curriculum is being applied consistently across the practice settings in the overall assessment plan. The site visit will include discussion with faculty and residents or fellows-in-training on the means by which ongoing communication is facilitated. Evidence 4.1.3.B Describe an example of a change made in the curriculum as a result of the ongoing review process (This may not be applicable to a new Program). 4.2 Evaluation of Physical Therapist Resident or Fellow-in-training from Entry to Graduation The Program has measurable performance outcomes for its residents/fellows-in-training that are consistent with the Program mission and goals. Interpretive Guideline: The curriculum begins with formulation of performance goals/measures for the Program graduates, statements of measurable behaviors reflective of the analysis of practice that describes the graduate’s clinical abilities and characteristics upon completion of the Program. The performance measures are consistent with the mission and goals of the Program and form the basis for evaluation of the Program and performance of the residents or fellows-in-training. Performance measures must also address factors ensuring that critical standards of safety for patients/clients are maintained. 4.2.1 The Program faculty determines that the physical therapist resident or fellow-in- training is competent and safe to function upon entry into the Program. Sports Physical Therapy Residency and Fellowship Program Additional Requirement: resident or fellow-in-training must possess one of the following: a current ATC designation, a current license as an EMT, or certification as an Emergency Medical Responder PRIOR to commencing the Program. Interpretive Guideline: The initial evaluation process should be designed to ensure that the resident and/or fellow-in-training meet admission criteria. Evaluation of Physical Therapist Resident or Fellow-in-training from Entry through Graduation Evidence 4.2.1 Describe the mechanisms for determining the resident's or fellow-in-training’s initial competence and safety within the clinical setting upon entry into the Program. 4.2.2 The Program faculty establishes, assesses, and evaluates resident or fellow-in- training performance on an ongoing basis, based on established assessment criteria including a minimum of one (1) written examination and two (2) live patient/client practical examinations over the course of the curriculum. Non- clinical programs must include a minimum of one (1) written examination and two (2) assessments over the course of the curriculum. Orthopedic Manual Therapy Fellowship Additional Requirements include a minimum of:  One written examination
  33. 33. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 33  Four technique examinations on models and/or patients/clients with a minimum of one technique demonstrated during each exam.  One patient exam with a spinal/axial focus. (Ideally one evaluation and two follow-ups). The fellow-in-training is required to demonstrate skill in application of low velocity and high velocity manipulative (thrust) techniques. Practicum and oral discussion are part of this exam.  One patient exam with a peripheral/appendicular focus (Ideally one evaluation and two follow-ups). The fellow-in-training is required to demonstrate skill in application of low velocity and high velocity manipulative (thrust) techniques. Practicum and oral discussion are part of this exam.  Oral defense: the fellow-in-training should be able to orally defend the examination and treatment decisions following each patient examination.  Ongoing informal assessments of clinical competence. Sports Physical Therapy Residency Additional Requirements include a minimum of:  Four technique examinations on such topics as rehabilitation techniques, advanced evaluation techniques, manual therapy techniques  One patient examination in the clinic for each: knee, ankle, spinal/axial, and upper extremity  Direct observation of a patient examination on the field for both contact and non-contact sport (the observation of the examination may be administered by a physical therapist, an athletic trainer, or team physician, however the final determination of pass/fail will be made by the physical therapist overseeing the resident’s athletic venue experience)  One patient examination for pre-participation screen  One patient examination for wellness evaluation  One patient examination for functional testing for return to sport for each: knee, ankle, spinal/axial, and upper extremity Interpretive Guideline: Methods of evaluating the performance of the clinical resident or fellow-in-training, relative to the set of learning experiences, should be both formative and summative, based on the performance measures, and provided in a timely manner. Evidence 4.2.2.A Describe the process used to evaluate the resident's or fellow-in-training’s advancing level of competence and safety within an area of specialized practice, consistent with the practice description. Evidence 4.2.2.B Provide didactic and clinical performance outcome assessment tools (eg, testing materials, examinations, checklists). These tools must include the operational definitions for all grading scales utilized including pass/fail criteria. Completed resident or fellow-in-training performance evaluations (names may be masked) will be reviewed onsite. Evidence 4.2.2.C Provide a list of patient reported or performance based measures of body structure and function (impairments) and activity and participation (physical, emotional, social, function, quality of life) used in the program as part of the program/participant evaluation process.
  34. 34. Residency/Fellowship Evaluative Criteria (Effective January 1, 2013) 34 Interpretive Guideline: Examples of patient reported outcome measures include: Oswestry, DASH, Lower Extremity Function Scale, ABC, DHI, etc. Examples of performance based outcome measures include: FIM, Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go. Examples of impairment based outcome measures include: ROM, Strength, Pain, Heart Rate, Blood Pressure. Evidence 4.2.2.D Describe how the resident/fellow-in-training utilizes these measures to reflect upon their performance with their patients/clients with the intent of future improvement of clinical performance. Interpretive Guideline: Provide a brief description that outlines how the program assures the resident/fellow-in-training is utilizing patient reported or performances based measures to evaluate their own performance and improve their patient/client management skills. Examples include, but are not limited to, formal or informal discussion between the faculty and program participant, resident/fellow-in- training completing a self reflection journal that is reviewed by faculty, etc. 4.3 Post-Graduation Performance of Clinical Residents or Fellows 4.3.1 The Program regularly collects information about the post-graduation performance of the residency or fellowship graduate, which is used for Program evaluation and modification. Interpretive Guideline: An expectation exists that the Program will engage in a planning process based on the measurement of performance of its residents or fellows as it relates to the roles and responsibilities of the physical therapist. Evidence 4.3.1.A Provide the survey used to determine if the program graduates have met the goals of the program. Describe the program’s plan to survey its graduates at least once every 5 years following completion of the program. For programs re-credentialing, provide a summary of the results and any changes that were made to the program based on the results. Interpretive Guidelines: Programs must obtain feedback from their graduates on whether the program is meeting its established goals and objectives. This information must be collected at least once every 5 years for all participants that graduated within those 5 years. For example, if board certification is a goal of the program, the program must evaluate the number of graduates who have sat and passed the board certification examination. Programs should make modifications to their curriculum should it find that the program’s goals and objectives are not being met. During re-credentialing, completed surveys will be reviewed during the site visit. Evidence 4.3.1.B Describe how the information collected from Program graduates is used to evaluate and modify the Program. If the Program is new, describe how the information will be used. Evidence 4.3.1.C Describe an example of how the Program has been modified as a result of the information received from graduates (not applicable for new Programs). Interpretive Guideline: The goal of program assessment is ultimately to improve the Program’s ability to meet their goals. For example, if a resident reports feeling unprepared to independently manage a patient with advanced TMJ degeneration, then the Program should use that information to improve that portion of the curriculum.

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