Trees off Hudson Square

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Tree diversity and species in the Hudson Square district of New York City.

Tree diversity and species in the Hudson Square district of New York City.

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  • 1. The Trees ofHUDSON SQUARE
  • 2. Japanese Pagoda Tree
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 3. Japanese Pagoda Tree
    Funfacts
    • Gets its name because it was frequently planted beside Buddhist temples in
    Japan (“pagodas”)
    • In the fall, Japanese Pagodas grow strings of bead-like pods.
    Where to find this tree
    • Corner of Spring and Greenwich St (some especially beautiful ones)
    • 4. Along Hudson St—between Charlton and Vandam St
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 5. Honey Locust
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 6. Honey Locust
    Funfacts
    • Most common street tree in Manhattan (nearly a quarter of all street trees).
    • 7. Drops thin brown seed pods that can be crushed into a pulp that has a
    sweet honey-like taste
    •  Native Americans used to ferment the pulp into an intoxicating drink
    Where to find this tree
    • Corner of Spring and Greenwich St (some especially beautiful ones)
    • 8. Along Charlton St—between Varick and 6th Ave
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 9. Callery Pear
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 10. Callery Pear
    Funfacts
    • Most common street tree in Hudson Square
    • 11. One of the last tree to lose its leaves (mid-November)
    • 12. Produces small, hard fruit that birds like to eat; blooms white flowers in
    early spring.
    Where to find this tree
    • Along Varick St—between Watts and Broome St
    • 13. They’re everywhere on Hudson St!
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 14. Zelkova
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 15. Zelkova
    Funfacts
    • Produces beautiful rusty orange fall leaves
    • 16. Promoted as a substitute for the American elm trees because it’s resistant
    to Dutch elm disease
    Where to find this tree
    • Along Hudson St—between Dominick and Broome St
    • 17. On Greenwich St, below Spring Street
    • 18. Outside of 250 Hudson Street
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 19. American Elm
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 20. American Elm
    Funfacts
    • Can grow over 100 feet tall
    • 21. State tree of both Massachusetts and North Dakota
    Where to find this tree
    • Along 6th Avenue, south of Vandam St
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 22. Ginko
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 23. Ginko
    Funfacts
    • Often referred to as a “living fossil”; has no close living relatives
    • 24. Nearly extinct in the wild
    • 25. Live incredibly long—some approximately 2,500 years!
    • 26. Produces fruit-like seeds that have a distinct (smelly!) odor. Seeds are
    popularly used for cooking and medicine in Japan and China
    Where to find this tree
    • Along Hudson St—across from Cody’s Bar and Grill
    • 27. Along Charlton and King St—between Varick and 6th Ave
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 28. Pin Oak
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 29. Pin Oak
    Funfacts
    • Adapted to live in Australia and Argentina as well as US
    • 30. Although deciduous, often will retain leaves through winter
    Where to find this tree
    • Corner of Spring and Renwick St
    • 31. Along West Houston St—between Varick and 6th Ave
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 32. Willow Oak
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 33. Willow Oak
    Funfacts
    • Leaf shape make it unique from other Oak trees
    • 34. Squirrels and birds love Willow Oak acorns
    • 35.  Hard heavy wood popular in building construction
    Where to find this tree
    • Corner of Spring and Hudson St
    • 36. Right off of Varick, on Vandam St
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 37. London Plane
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 38. London Plane
    Funfacts
    • Most common street tree in New York City (approx. 15% of all street trees)
    • 39. City began planting London plane trees in the 1930's while Robert Moses
    was at the helm
    • Although debated, many believe this tree’s leaf is the Parks Department’s
    logo
    Where to find this tree
    • Enormous one in Duarte Park, right outside of Lent Space
    • 40. Along Hudson St—between Broome and Canal St
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 41. Hawthorn Tree
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 42. Hawthorn Tree
    Funfacts
    • Often wider than they are tall
    • 43. Young leaves are apparently good in salads
    • 44. The fruit of hawthorn (called haws) are edible, but are rarely eaten fresh
    • 45. Commonly made into jellies, jams, and syrups used to make wine
    Where to find this tree
    • Corner of Spring and Greenwich St (some especially beautiful ones)
    • 46. Along Hudson St—between Charlton and King St
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 47. Green Ash
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE
  • 48. Green Ash
    Funfacts
    •  Very popular wood used in making guitars
    • 49. Gibson, Fender, Ibanez, and many luthiers use ash in the construction of
    their guitars
    Where to find this tree
    • Outside of Chelsea High School and The Villager building
    (facing Soho Park)
    The Trees of HUDSON SQUARE