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Common Entrepreneur Mistakes
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Common Entrepreneur Mistakes

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This slide show outlines the more common mistakes made by entrepreneurs in new start-up ventures.

This slide show outlines the more common mistakes made by entrepreneurs in new start-up ventures.

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Common Entrepreneur Mistakes Common Entrepreneur Mistakes Presentation Transcript

  • Common Entrepreneur Mistakes Presented by Bart Greenberg Haynes and Boone, LLP Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies Marshall School of Business, USC May 25, 2011© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • The Wrong Business Structure© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • The “De Facto” Partnership  What is it?  Problems: • Ownership of IP • Vicarious Liability© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • The “Wrong” State of Formation  California vs. Delaware • California is shareholder friendly • Delaware is management friendly  Special Case of the So-Called Quasi- California Corporation  Why You DON’T Necessarily Want to Be in Nevada • You will most likely pay taxes • The law is not as well defined© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Failing to Make the “S Election”  Consequences of Subchapter S Election • Pass-Through of Income • Pass-Through of Losses —Pros —Cons  DON’T Miss Filing Deadline • RU Dead in the water? • Retroactive S Election?© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Keep it Simple!  Don’t Over-Build at Start-Up. Avoid the Following: • Multiple operating companies or special business units (Subs) • Related party engineering, development or service companies  Restructuring Can Be Expensive and Involve Negative Tax Consequences© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • The Wrong Team© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Putting off the Inevitable  Most Start-Ups Tend to Be Too Quick to Hire and Too Long to Fire • Don’t hire Just because someone will work for equity or for free • Things will get worse and much more complicated to unwind  Avoid Urge to Hire friends & Family  Avoid Those With “Checkered” Pasts  Recognize Your Own Limitations© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Mishandling the Inevitable  DON’T Violate California Labor Laws • An employee who is discharged must be paid all wages, including accrued vacation, at time of termination • An employee who quits must be paid all wages, including accrued vacation, within 72 hours of quitting  ALWAYS get releases from liability on separation (even if you have to pay for it!)© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Failing to Protect the IP© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Failing to Get IP into Company  Two Typical Approaches: • Contribution for equity • Licensing arrangements  Factors to Consider: • Protection from creditors • Additional “Fields of Use” • Tax considerations© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Creating Clouds on Title to IP  The “Moonlighting” Founder • Under Section 2870 of the California Labor Code, Employer owns IP unless: —Employee developed entirely on her own time; and —Employee did not use employers equipment, supplies, facilities or trade secret information • Exception for any of the following IP, that: —Relates at time of conception to employers business, or actual or demonstrably anticipated research or development of employer; or —Results from any work performed by employee for employer.© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Creating Clouds on Title to IP (cont.) Other Employment Related Issues: • Get employment agreement in place before employee starts work —Obligations to execute assignments and to reasonably cooperate —Non-solicitation of employees, customers and vendors • Check for pre-existing duties of confidentiality to former employer • Ask to see employment agreement from former employer© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Creating Clouds on Title to IP (cont.)  Issues Relating to “Work for Hire” (i.e., Contractors) • GET consulting agreement in place BEFORE consultant starts work • Without a suitable agreement, you may “own” nothing more than a limited license to use what was developed, even though you paid for the work! • Negotiate for ownership UP FRONT, before a deal is pending© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Treating Stock Like Water© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Oral Promises of Equity  Oral Agreements ARE Enforceable  The Problems with Oral Agreements are: • Terms are never well defined or fully thought out • Difficult for employer to disprove claimed existence of such an arrangement  “Sleeping Dogs” Tend to Wake Up When Exit is imminent© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Using Equity as Cheap Currency  Know What is Market. How Much is Too Much?  Keep an Accurate Capitalization Table  Look for Alternative Ways to Finance the Business: Bootstrap!  DON’T Forget About Compliance with Applicable Securities Laws© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Not Enough Strings Attached  Use of Restricted Stock and Vesting  ALWAYS use a probationary period  Repurchase Rights Upon Termination  All Equity Should Be Made Subject to a Shareholders’ Agreement • Restrictions on Transfer • Rights of First Refusal • Repurchase Rights on Trigger Events • Tags, Drags and Shotguns • Proxies and Voting Agreements© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Failure to Maintain Corporate Formalities© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • What Corporate Formalities?  Hold and Properly Document Meetings to Authorize All Requisite Corporate Actions  Maintain and Keep Separate: • Minutes Books & Accounting Records • Bank Accounts • Insurance & Licenses • Contracts and Leases • Letterhead and Stationary  Don’t Run Personal Items Through the Company© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Consequences to So Maintain  Alter Ego Liability (aka “Piercing of the Corporate Veil”) to Third Parties  Contracts May Be Voidable at Option of Third Parties  Liability to Equity Holders for Breach of Fiduciary Duties  The Company May be “Unfundable”© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Not Leaving Enough Runway© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Underestimating Capital Requirements  Make Sure Your Projections Are Sound (Then Double Your Cash Requirements!)  Make Sure Your Capital Sources are For Real – Get it in Writing!  Think Long and Hard About Quitting Your Day Job© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Seeking Capital Too Early  Build the Business First, Then Seek Capital  DON’T Lose Focus and Permit the Business to Suffer While You Seek Capital  Only Seek Capital From Appropriate Sources© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Wasting Time by Spinning Wheels  GET Educated; Learn What is Market  Network with Appropriate Referral Sources  DON’T Work with Finders Unless You Have a Referral from a Trusted Source • They will gladly take your money • They could waste precious time© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • No Contingency Plan in Place  ALWAYS Have a Back-Up Plan  Pull the Trigger BEFORE it is Too Late© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Questions?© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Common Entrepreneur Mistakes Thank you! Presented by Bart Greenberg Haynes and Boone, LLP (949) 202-3037 bart.greenberg@haynesboone.com© 2010 Haynes and Boone, LLP