How IT and Developers can join forces to innovate in the Cloud

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The presentation begins with the rise of the developer and their key role in cloud. From there we talk about how IT can best work with developers to drive innovation, while at the same time maintaining stability (spoiler alert: the answer is DevOps). To see a recording of the presentation, check out https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/9463/72117

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  • Slide 2: Developers are kingsWeb companies survive and thrive through innovation and its developers that drive that innovation. It’s no secret that the secret sauce in any web company is the software. The software environment in these companies is dominated by open source software, on top of which developers then write their own applications, it is these applications that provide the web company with its competitive advantage. As a result, in a web company it is the developer who holds the power . It is the developers who make the key architectural decisions like the Programming Language (s), Platform (OS), Middleware and how data is stored.
  • Use managed APIs everywhere:  development shops must think deeply about security, authorization, and real-time management of the data that flows into and out of their application through third-party applications. – ForresterAPIs are specially crafted to expose only chosen functionality and/or data while safeguarding other parts of the application which provides the interfaceWith the rise of cloud computing, where a mix of applications is both internally and externally hosted, the ability for various independent applications to be able to communicate with each other has never been more important.
  • I&O and developers have two different ways of looking at the cloudVirtualization is bottom-up -- I&O see cloud as a linear upward progression, you start with infrastructure and keep stacking layers on top.  Most virtualized infrastructure is quite consolidated, but not very agile.   Static virtualization still rules – you can try and make it incrementally faster and easier to provision, but that’s not the best path to cloud.Cloud is top-down --Developers see cloud as a service first and don’t care much about the layers below.  They don’t care about the VM container their app will eventually run in as long as they are able to get it fast, run it hot, and through it away as soon as their done with it – and they only want to be charged for the time they’re actually running it.
  • Slide 3 But their kingdom is changingWhile the developer’s influence is on firm ground in Web companies, their accountability is growing and their responsibilities are expanding. In the past, Developers have kept their distance from operations. It is not surprising that these groups have stood apart in light of how vastly different their goals and objectives have been. Developers are goaled to drive innovation and reinvention in order to constantly improve on user experience and deliver new features to stay one step ahead of the competition. Operations on the other hand is focused on providing rock solid stability, never letting the site go down, while at the same time being able to scale at a moment’s notice. Between the two sides exists what is known as “the wall of confusion.” Traditionally developers have written their applications isolated from operations and then have then lobbed them over the wall where ops use a completely different and incompatible set of tools to test and deploy. When an application goes down there is a pointing of fingers as to who is to blame. Needless to say this disconnect introduces considerable friction and inefficiencies into business slowing down delivering innovative features to customers and users.The response to this disconnect has been the emergence of the DevOps model. DevOps, which as the name implies is a linking of DEVelopment and OPerations, is the idea of using people, processes and tools to break down the wall that traditionally exists between the two sides. The former delineation of responsibilities blurs: Developers are asked to put “skin in the game” and for example carry a pager to be notified when an application goes down. Conversely operations will need to learn at least basic coding. In this new world order, developers and ops folks who understand and can work with “the other side” will be the ones hired first. Ultimately by doing away with the divide between development and operations, DevOps practices and technologies help companies to accelerate the delivery of new features safely and at scale. Because new features can be delivered more frequently, for many web companies, putting DevOps into practice directly contributes to better business results. As “frequent functionality” is put into practice, the removal of friction accelerates the business model driving greater adoption, user retention and ultimately monetization.
  • Slide 3 But their kingdom is changingWhile the developer’s influence is on firm ground in Web companies, their accountability is growing and their responsibilities are expanding. In the past, Developers have kept their distance from operations. It is not surprising that these groups have stood apart in light of how vastly different their goals and objectives have been. Developers are goaled to drive innovation and reinvention in order to constantly improve on user experience and deliver new features to stay one step ahead of the competition. Operations on the other hand is focused on providing rock solid stability, never letting the site go down, while at the same time being able to scale at a moment’s notice. Between the two sides exists what is known as “the wall of confusion.” Traditionally developers have written their applications isolated from operations and then have then lobbed them over the wall where ops use a completely different and incompatible set of tools to test and deploy. When an application goes down there is a pointing of fingers as to who is to blame. Needless to say this disconnect introduces considerable friction and inefficiencies into business slowing down delivering innovative features to customers and users.The response to this disconnect has been the emergence of the DevOps model. DevOps, which as the name implies is a linking of DEVelopment and OPerations, is the idea of using people, processes and tools to break down the wall that traditionally exists between the two sides. The former delineation of responsibilities blurs: Developers are asked to put “skin in the game” and for example carry a pager to be notified when an application goes down. Conversely operations will need to learn at least basic coding. In this new world order, developers and ops folks who understand and can work with “the other side” will be the ones hired first. Ultimately by doing away with the divide between development and operations, DevOps practices and technologies help companies to accelerate the delivery of new features safely and at scale. Because new features can be delivered more frequently, for many web companies, putting DevOps into practice directly contributes to better business results. As “frequent functionality” is put into practice, the removal of friction accelerates the business model driving greater adoption, user retention and ultimately monetization.
  • How IT and Developers can join forces to innovate in the Cloud

    1. 1. 1 Global MarketingHow IT and Developers CanJoin Forces to Innovate inthe CloudBarton GeorgeDirector, Developer ProgramsDellJohn WillisDirector, Cloud ManagementDell (Enstratius)
    2. 2. 2 Global MarketingOverview and agendaYou will learn• How developers have risen topower• The key principles, tools andprocedures of DevOps• How working together helpsreduce friction, increasesvelocity and improves customeroutcomes• How developers, IT andbusiness can work together toimplement and drive innovationin the cloudAgenda• Introduction• The rise of the developer• How developers are driving thedefacto cloud strategy• How the world of developers ischanging• The key processes, proceduresand culture shifts of DevOps• Next Steps• Q&A
    3. 3. 3 Global MarketingJohn WillisDirector, Cloud ManagementDell (Enstratius)Barton GeorgeDirector, Developer ProgramsDellSpeaker introduction
    4. 4. 4 Global MarketingPoll: Which best matches your function?DevelopmentLine of businessIT operationsOther
    5. 5. 5 Global MarketingDevelopers are kingDecreed:1. Programming language2. Platform (OS)3. Middleware4. How data is stored
    6. 6. 6 Global MarketingThe rise of thedeveloper:How did theyget here?Source: The New Kingmakers, Stephen O’Grady, March 2013Open sourceThe cloudSeed stagefinancingThe internet
    7. 7. 7 Global MarketingHow this has altered the tech landscapeEmpowermentChoiceAgilitySource: The New Kingmakers, Stephen O’Grady, March 2013Innovation• Software becoming a means to an end• Language/tool proliferation• Open Source becomes ubiquitous• Triumph of organic standards:convenience trumps features• The importance of APIs
    8. 8. 8 Global MarketingWhat does this mean for the Cloud?Source: IDC: It Cloud Services At The Crossroads (Stephen Hendrick, Robert Mahowald, Malanie Posey), April 2013, doc #240572of net new software built in 2013 willbe built for cloud delivery?85%
    9. 9. 9 Global MarketingCloud IaaS: Who is the buyer?Source: Gartner, Market Trends - How Customers Purchase Cloud Iaas (Lydia Leong), January 2013Data center infrastructure assets, as wellas outsourced services such as hosting,have traditionally been purchased by abusiness’s IT operations – often inconjunction with a procurementorganization.Cloud IaaS has a different buyer andprocurement cycle. Businessleadership, not IT, often controls thebudget.Part of a broader shift in IT procurementpatterns:Responsibility increasingly shared bythe business and ITBudget increasingly comes from thebusiness
    10. 10. 10 Global MarketingDevelopers are leading the foray into cloudSource: Gartner – Market Trends - How Customers PurchaseCloud Iaas (Lydia Leong), January 2013Source: Forrester Research, Inc. - The Rise Of The New CloudAdmin (James Staten, Lauren E Nelson), February 2013• Rather than Central IT, it willbe business-unit-aligneddevelopers (the new “cloudadmin”) who will lead thecompany into the cloud• Business looks to developersto drive a solution rather thanI&O• Developers start with solutionsthat are designed to integratewith public cloud first and theenterprise second• Developers are the face ofbusiness buyers• This is not unsanctionedadoption; the IT ops teammight actively be opposed toit, but this use is sanctioned bythe business and paid for bythe business
    11. 11. 11 Global MarketingTypical enterprise cloud adoption cycle1. An individual technical user, often a developergets a cloud IaaS for a project – usually one whichmust be completed on a tight schedule2. This ad hoc adoption grows organically, projectby project and person by person3. A company becomes aware that it has multipleprojects running on cloud IaaS and decides itneeds better governance4. Enterprise arch team tasked with• writing cloud IaaS adoption policy• setting the governance rules• evaluating providers (usually in cooperation with IT ops)• signing MSA’s with one or more IaaS providers5. IT projects are able to adopt any approved IaaSproviders at their own discretion6. IT ops may decide to adopt a workload migrationstrategy, shifting some new and existing workloadsonto cloud IaaSSource: Gartner – Market Trends - How Customers Purchase Cloud Iaas (Lydia Leong), January 2013
    12. 12. 12 Global MarketingWhat does this mean for IT?of IT shops think cloud first to solve aproblem – Dell survey?15%
    13. 13. 13 Global MarketingIT response #1• Very different workloads• Virtualized applications are traditional in design: don’t scale out, aren’tcomponentized web services, tend to have a fixed and permanent footprint• Cloud applications are elastic or transient: designed to scale out,componentized in construction, intercommunicate via web services,designed to failSource: Forrester Research, Inc. - The Rise Of The New Cloud Admin (James Staten, Lauren E Nelson), February 2013Build on top of existingvirtualization (wrong)
    14. 14. 14 Global MarketingIT response #2• Not a way of keeping the business from the public cloud• Private clouds are an extension of the public cloud not vice versa• The public cloud development team is buyer and driver of requirements anduser experience for private clouds• To be a private cloud it must– provide self-service access to developers– be fully standardized and automated– have a pay-per-use model or another mechanism for incenting developers to notpark workloads there foreverSource: The Rise Of The New Cloud Admin, James Staten, Lauren E Nelson, Forrester Research Inc, February 21, 2013Build a private cloud(maybe wrong)
    15. 15. 15 Global MarketingModern response #3: DevOpsInnovation StabilityDevelopers OperationsThe good ol’daysVS
    16. 16. 16 Global MarketingModern response: DevOpsInnovation + StabilityThe new world orderFlexible, agile, able to adaptDevOpsInnovation StabilityDevelopers OperationsThe good ol’daysVS
    17. 17. 17 Global MarketingPoll: Are you familiar with DevOps?A. Never heard of itB. Know of it, but not usingC. Just starting to learnD. Currently practicing
    18. 18. 18 Global MarketingDevOpsWhat is DevopsShortenLead time$Dev OpsWall of confusionFeedback
    19. 19. 19 Global MarketingDevOpsCulture LeanAutomation Measurement Sharing
    20. 20. 20 Global MarketingDevOpsBusiness CustomerThe first way:systems thinkingThe second way:amplify feedbackloopsThe third way:culture ofcontinualexperimentationand learningDev OpsDev OpsDev Ops
    21. 21. 21 Global MarketingCommon technical characteristicsBeing agileabout agileOpen sourceand opencultureCloud orcloud-likeinfrastructure
    22. 22. 22 Global MarketingCounter intuitive nature DevOps• Fail fast and often• Less time in design• Deploy in small increments• WIP Limits/Slack time• People over process
    23. 23. 23 Global MarketingDevOps culture principles• No rock star mentality– Shared contributions• Healthy attitudes towards failure– Failures are learning opportunities• The problem is the enemy– No blame games• No victims– Shared blame• Develop shared metrics– Focus on end goal• Alignment of Purpose– Shared goals/ slay the dragon
    24. 24. 24 Global MarketingDevOps in developmentDone means releasedCode deploy not code completeInfrastructure as codeConfiguration is code and needscontrolFrequent releasesSelf service / continuous deliveryVersion control everythingEverything is an artifact (scripts, xml,source)Instrument operationsFeature flags / canary releases /immune systemsTest end-to-endTest driven code and infrastructure
    25. 25. 25 Global MarketingDevOps in operationsIf anything fails stop the lineReduce technical debt earlyInstrument pervasivelyCollect data to detect trends earlyEnable graceful degradationSome availability is better than noneIf it’s hard do it more oftenPractice makes perfectMTTR vs. MTBFRe-provision not repairIt’s easier to recover to a known stateAutomate where possibleDesired state consistency
    26. 26. 26 Global MarketingDevOps in the organizationChat roomsSkype, Hipcat, WatercoolerSlack timeAllowing special free project timeFun working environmentsGames, reading rooms, barsEmbedded engineersDev in ops or ops in devHack daysCreating collaborative projects
    27. 27. 27 Global MarketingTechnical debt
    28. 28. 28 Global MarketingTechnicaldebtVicious cycleToxicoperationsTerminal
    29. 29. 29 Global MarketingTale of two startups1020304050Traditional operations#ofhours1020304050Operations – the secret sauceHardwareOS installConfigUpkeepNewExistingServers05101520251 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Week #05101520251 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Week #
    30. 30. 30 Global MarketingMeat to math ratioAlisair Croll - O’reilly RadarRevenue/Employee ($000s)$ThousandsAmazonQ4100100200300400500Barnes&NobleQ410NetflixQ409BlockbusterQ409DropboxQ211GrouponQ211
    31. 31. 31 Global MarketingNext StepsHow do I get started?
    32. 32. 32 Global MarketingQ&AWhat questions do you have?
    33. 33. 33 Global MarketingConfidentialView Live on June 6, 2013 – On Demand any time afterCheck out all of the Webinars in the SeriesIs Cloud Meeting Your Expectations? Today’s Results….Tomorrows Promiseslive at 8am PDT / 10am CDTHow IT and Developers Can Join Forces to Innovate in the Cloudlive at 9am PDT / 11am CDTExperience Collaboration and Sharing With Dell Cloud Service for SharePointlive at 10m PDT / 12pm CDTCompliance Exclusive: What Healthcare Can Teach Business about the Cloudlive at 11am PDT / 1pm CDTCloud Security: Don’t Throw Caution to the Windlive at 12pm PDT / 2pm CDTOn-Demand High Performance Computinglive at 1pm PDT / 3pm CDT
    34. 34. 34 Global Marketing

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