Elements of Design
LINE
ELEMENTS OF DESIGN
Elements of design are “tools”.
•Just like the carpenter has a
hammer and saw, the designer has
the ele...
Line: the extension of a point
Line delineates space, outlines form, and conveys a sense of
movement or direction. It can ...
• Horizontal Lines: Solidity, stability, peaceful/restful,
harmonious, weighty, secure
Horizontal lines suggest a solid, h...
Vertical lines: dignified, stable, formal, imposing, strength
Vertical lines lift the eye upward and
suggest tallness or h...
• Diagonal Lines: Action, movement, interest, stability.
Diagonal lines are flexible because their
exact direction may var...
• Zigzag Lines: Exciting, lively, rhythmic movement.

Chevron or Herringbone

Flamestitch

Zigzag lines are short
diagonal...
Curved Lines: Soft, humanizing, gracefulness, joyful.
Curved or circular lines provide relief and softness to straight and...
Eclectic: a combination
Eclectic is a word that is used widely in the field of housing design. It
simply means “a combinat...
3. Select a sheet of colored
8x10” paper, and use it
horizontally or vertically.
4. Title your project:
Identifying Line i...
By Your Name
Design Object: Clock

CURVED LINE:
Easy on the
eyes; pleasing
to view

DIAGONAL LINE:
Interesting

VERTICAL:
...
1. Select a specific design material,
either wallpaper OR fabric.
2. Find 4 actual samples of your design material (not pi...
By Your Name
Design Object: Interior Decorating Fabric

Curved print: design
on the sheets in a
preschool girl’s room

Ver...
Housing - Line
Housing - Line
Housing - Line
Housing - Line
Housing - Line
Housing - Line
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Housing - Line

  1. 1. Elements of Design LINE
  2. 2. ELEMENTS OF DESIGN Elements of design are “tools”. •Just like the carpenter has a hammer and saw, the designer has the elements. There are 4 elements of design: LINE, Form, Color, & Texture.
  3. 3. Line: the extension of a point Line delineates space, outlines form, and conveys a sense of movement or direction. It can be straight or curved. Line can express various feelings and emotions. There are 4 basic types of lines: Vertical Horizontal Diagonal Curved Lines are derived from nature…
  4. 4. • Horizontal Lines: Solidity, stability, peaceful/restful, harmonious, weighty, secure Horizontal lines suggest a solid, harmonious relationship with the Earth; the Earth's gravity has no further pull. This gives a stabilizing, peaceful harmonious effect to window treatments. When found in a connecting architectural detail such as molding, horizontal lines provide a smooth transition between rooms or areas. If they lead to a focal point, they help to emphasize it. When horizontal lines lead to a window, the eye stops at the outside view or the beauty of the decorative window treatment. Too many horizontal lines in an interior may become boring and lack visual interest. Horizontal lines make a room appear wider or longer.
  5. 5. Vertical lines: dignified, stable, formal, imposing, strength Vertical lines lift the eye upward and suggest tallness or height. They have the ability to lift the mind and the spirit as well. As such, vertical lines are purposeful tools for architects and designers of churches and public buildings because they inspire awe and tend to diminish the significance of human scale. Vertical lines are stable because they represent a perpendicular resistance to Earth's gravity. They convey a feeling of strength and dignity and are quite appropriate in formal living areas, as well as offices and public meeting and performing spaces. However, this formality can bring stiffness or a commanding feeling to the interior. Too many vertical lines can cause a feeling of uneasiness, of too much confinement and predictability. People will feel they must pay more attention and sit up straighter, which can become tiresome.
  6. 6. • Diagonal Lines: Action, movement, interest, stability. Diagonal lines are flexible because their exact direction may vary from shallow to steep angles. Diagonal lines generally suggest movement, action or dynamism, perhaps because diagonal lines are associated with going places—up or down a staircase or escalator, the taking off or landing of an airplane, for example. Diagonal lines are interesting, possibly because the angles seem to defy gravity and the eye and mind are stimulated. Yet diagonal lines also can be secure, such as the reinforcing diagonals of a roof truss system. Too many diagonal lines, particularly on a wall or at the window, can be over stimulating, compete with horizontal or vertical lines and perhaps become tiresome.
  7. 7. • Zigzag Lines: Exciting, lively, rhythmic movement. Chevron or Herringbone Flamestitch Zigzag lines are short diagonal lines that reverse upon themselves and form a regular or irregular pattern. A zigzag line can be one single line or several in a set. A set of regular zigzag lines is called a chevron or herringbone pattern, and irregular zigzag lines are typically called a flamestitch pattern. Angular zigzag lines can add energy and life to an interior. If too many zigzag lines are incorporated, however, the effect can be confusing, frenzied and agitating.
  8. 8. Curved Lines: Soft, humanizing, gracefulness, joyful. Curved or circular lines provide relief and softness to straight and angular lines and balance the harshness of too many straight lines. Curved lines give a human quality to interiors; they can be easy on the eyes and pleasing to view. Tightly curved lines can add playfulness, frivolity, and zest. A series of curved lines, such as an arcade (a procession of arches), gives a rhythmic cadence to an interior, suggesting graceful movement. In architectural components, round or elliptical segments (sections of circles or ovals), such as archways and arched transoms or fanlights, provide graceful dignity to interiors. Generously curved lines are viewed as feminine. An excess of curved lines may become too decorative and consequently, visually demanding.
  9. 9. Eclectic: a combination Eclectic is a word that is used widely in the field of housing design. It simply means “a combination”. When using line in design, it means that several different types of line are present in significant amounts. The designer must be careful not to combine the different types of line in a manner that appears confusing or lacking in “taste”. One line will often be planned to dominate in order to accomplish a desired effect. Curved, horizontal, diagonal, and vertical lines are present. What do you think?
  10. 10. 3. Select a sheet of colored 8x10” paper, and use it horizontally or vertically. 4. Title your project: Identifying Line in Design 1. Select a specific design “object”. This example uses a clock, so you must choose something else. Perhaps a window treatment, silverware pattern, a table lamp, etc. 2. Find 4 colored magazine or catalog pictures of your object that illustrate all 4 types of line… making sure the line is part of the structure of the object, not just the print on fabric. 5. Add your name and identify your design object By Your Name Design Object: Clock 6. Mount the pictures; you may want to mat them for neatness 7. Label each picture with the type of line and one or two words about the effect of the line 8. Apply a border if desired DIAGONAL LINE: Interesting CURVED LINE: Easy on the eyes; pleasing to view HORIZONTAL: Sturdy VERTICAL: Dignified
  11. 11. By Your Name Design Object: Clock CURVED LINE: Easy on the eyes; pleasing to view DIAGONAL LINE: Interesting VERTICAL: Dignified HORIZONTAL: Sturdy
  12. 12. 1. Select a specific design material, either wallpaper OR fabric. 2. Find 4 actual samples of your design material (not pictures), illustrating all 4 types of line. The line should not be part of the structure, but will be in the actual print. 3. Select a sheet of colored 8x10” paper, and use it horizontally or vertically. 4. Title your project: Identifying Line in Design, add your name, and identify your design material. 5. Mount the samples; you may want to mat them for neatness 6. Wallpaper samples should be labeled with the type of line AND the room of the house where you would put this paper. Fabric samples should be labeled with the type of line AND the specific room and item of furniture that would be adorned with this fabric (dining room chairs). 7. Apply a border if desired. By Your Name Design Object: Interior Decorating Fabric Curved print: design on the sheets in a preschool girl’s room Horizontal print: seat cushions on the kitchen dinette Vertical print: the upholstery on the sun porch furniture Diagonal print: used to cover throw pillows in the family game room
  13. 13. By Your Name Design Object: Interior Decorating Fabric Curved print: design on the sheets in a preschool girl’s room Vertical print: the upholstery on the sun porch furniture Horizontal print: seat cushions on the kitchen dinette Diagonal print: used to cover throw pillows in the family game room

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