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Philosophystavanger

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  • 1. Philosophy with children Socratic dialogue
  • 2.  
  • 3.
    • Bart Hofman
    • Master in Orthopedagogics
    • Plantijn Hogeschool
    • Antwerpen
  • 4.
    • Antwerpen:
  • 5.
    • Grown-ups love numbers. If you tell them you’ve got a new friend, they never ask the important question. They never say: “What does his voice sound like? Which games does he like to play? Does he collect butterfly’s?” But they ask: “How old is he? What is his weight? How much earns his father?” Only then they feel they know him. If you tell grown-ups: “I’ve seen the most beautifull house of red bricks, with daffodils in front of the windows and pigeons on the roof….” They can’t image the house. You have to say: “I’ve seen a house of 250 000 euro!” Then they yell : “How wonderfull!!!”
    • Antoine De Saint-Exupéry, The litle prince.
  • 6.
    • Are you what you do, or do you what you are?
  • 7.
    • Philosophy is not about the object but the manner.
    • Philosophy is not about the product but the proces
    • Philosophy is not about the specific but the obvious
  • 8.  
  • 9. Lipman’s view professor at Columbia University in New York
    • University stundents lack the ability to think. They don’t understand the rules of logics.
    • Still he sees that litle children were able to think. They’re willing to explore new things and they are curious.
    • Lipman sees that, once children are away from primary-school they loose their interessed in exloring. Instaid of stimulating them, theachers stop children to ask questions and withhold children to be explorers.
  • 10.
    • Socratic Dialogue is a method widely used in Europe which allows for in-depth understanding of various issues concerning everyday life. Through rigorous inquiry and consensus we start unraveling the basic assumptions we have.
  • 11. The Socratic Method
    •   The Socratic Method encourages participants to reflect and think independently and critically. The Socratic Dialogue is practiced in small groups with the help of a facilitator, so that self-confidence in one's own thinking is enhanced and the search for truth in answer to a particular question is undertaken in common.   No prior philosophical training is needed, provided participants are motivated to try the method, are willing to contribute their honest thoughts and to listen to those of others. The endeavour of the group is to reach consensus, not as an aim in itself, but as a means to deepen the investigation.  
  • 12. Dieter Krohn's (1998) Four indispensable features of Socratic Dialogue 
    • Starting with the concrete and remaining in contact with concrete experience : Insight is gained only when in all phases of a Socratic Dialogue the link between any statement made and personal experience is explicit. This means that a Socratic Dialogue is a process which concerns the whole person.
  • 13.
    • Full understanding between participants : This involves much more than verbal agreement. Everyone has to be clear about the meaning of what has just been said by testing it against her or his own concrete experience. The limitations of individual personal experience which stand in the way of full understanding should be made conscious and thereby transcended.
  • 14.
    • Adherence to a subsidiary question until it is answered : in order to achieve this the group is required to bring great commitment to their work and to gain self-confidence in the power of reason. This means on the one hand, not giving up when the work is difficult, but on the other, to be calm enough to accept, for a time, a different course in the dialogue in order then to return to the subsidiary question. 
  • 15.
    • Striving for consensus : This requires an honest examination of the thoughts of others and being honest in ones own statements. When such honesty and openness towards ones own and other participants´ feelings and thinking are present, then the striving for consensus will emerge, not necessarily the consensus itself.
  • 16.  
  • 17. Possible goals
    • Learn to think
    • Logics
    • Suprise
    • Learn from each other
    • Selfrespect – selfknowledge
    • Topics outside curriculum
    • Different methods
  • 18.  
  • 19. Possible Phases
    • 1 Introduction A brief inspiring introduction which holds a topic that can be expolerd.
  • 20. Possible Phases
    • 1 Introduction A brief inspiring introduction which holds a topic that can be expolerd.
    • 2 Questions
    • The children ask questions based on the introduction.
  • 21. Possible Phases
    • 1 Introduction A brief inspiring introduction which holds a topic that can be expolerd.
    • 2 Questions
    • The children ask questions based on the introduction.
    • 3 Collecting the questions
    • Making a list of possible starting-questions.
  • 22. Possible Phases
    • 1 Introduction A brief inspiring introduction which holds a topic that can be expolerd.
    • 2 Questions
    • The children ask questions based on the introduction.
    • 3 Collecting the questions
    • Making a list of possible starting-questions.
    • 4 Starting-questions Selecting the questions which will be the start of the exploring.
  • 23. Possible Phases
    • 1 Introduction A brief inspiring introduction which holds a topic that can be expolerd.
    • 2 Questions
    • The children ask questions based on the introduction.
    • 3 Collecting the questions
    • Making a list of possible starting-questions.
    • 4 Starting-questions Selecting the questions which will be the start of the exploring.
    • 5 Collecting answers Collecting the answers on the chosen question(s).
  • 24.
    • 6 Exploring-question Question which makes them to think futher about the starting-question.
  • 25.
    • 6 Exploring-question Question which makes them to think futher about the starting-question.
    • 7 Moment analysis Making a definition. Checking if what is said is true.
  • 26.
    • 6 Exploring-question Question which makes them to think futher about the starting-question.
    • 7 Moment analysis Making a definition. Checking if what is said is true.
    • 8 New point of perspective Changing perpective, creating a new question to come to a different point of view.
  • 27.
    • 6 Exploring-question Question which makes them to think futher about the starting-question.
    • 7 Moment analysis Making a definition. Checking if what is said is true.
    • 8 New point of perspective Changing perpective, creating a new question to come to a different point of view.
    • 9 Refering to a synthesis Children with a claer point of view can be used as a model.
  • 28.
    • 6 Exploring-question Question which makes them to think futher about the starting-question.
    • 7 Moment analysis Making a definition. Checking if what is said is true.
    • 8 New point of perspective Changing perpective, creating a new question to come to a different point of view.
    • 9 Refering to a synthesis Children with a claer point of view can be used as a model.
    • 10 conclusion Coming to a conclusion of what has been said.
  • 29. Notes!
    • We don’t have to learn children to think; they do it already.
    • Be really interessed.
    • Show respect for what children are saying.
    • PWC is listening to children who try to explain their thoughts.
    • The contents is more important than the form.
    • ‘ The Philospher’ (the grown-up) should ask the right questions to get ‘philosophical’ answers.
  • 30. Lid van de Associatie Universiteit & Hogescholen Antwerpen www.plantijn.be