UsingPCOMSwithYouthandtheSchoolsJohnMurphy

431 views

Published on

Webinar slides by Dr. John Murphy addressed the use of PCOMS with youth as well as using PCOMS in the schools.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
431
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
36
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

UsingPCOMSwithYouthandtheSchoolsJohnMurphy

  1. 1. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 Using PCOMS with Young People, Caregivers, and Schools A Heart & Soul of Change Project Webinar Presenter: John J. Murphy, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology & Counseling, University of Central Arkansas; Heart & Soul of Change Project Partner for Children, Adolescents, & Schools JMurphy@uca.edu www.drjohnmurphy.com Webinar Focus & Goal Focus: Special considerations and challenges in using PCOMS with children, adolescents, caregivers, and schools Goal: To address common questions raised by practitioners who work with young people and their caregivers in schools and other settings 1
  2. 2. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 Question 1 Why should I use PCOMS? Subtext… • Just what I need—more paperwork • I ask for client feedback already— why do I need to use a forms? • What’s so good about the PCOMS in particular? Question 1 Summary Why should I use PCOMS? • It’s part of the care/service itself • Providers are bad guessers at service fit and outcomes • Providers who use PCOMS have better outcomes than those who don’t 2
  3. 3. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 Question 2 Are young people in services “capable” of providing accurate feedback? Subtext… • It’s unrealistic and naïve to give a child or adolescent, especially a “disturbed” one, THAT much power in their care. Question 2 Summary Are young people in services “capable” of providing accurate feedback? • Client involvement correlates with outcomes • It’s common sense (and respectful) to involve the very person for whom services are designed to help • Young people WANT to be involved 3
  4. 4. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 Question 3 How can I adjust the administration of the measures to the age/abilities of young clients? Subtext… • Individually, Interpersonally,…young people don’t use words like that! y g ,p p , • What about young children, people who can’t read, and clients with cognitive and language disabilities? Adolescents • Validated for ages 13-17, but… © 4
  5. 5. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 Children • Validated for ages 6-12 • Under 6 • Involves all members of the family, even the youngest • Have crayons and places to color ready 5
  6. 6. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 Question 3 Summary How can I adjust the administration of the measures to the age/abilities of young clients? • Remember the PURPOSE of PCOMS • Make sure the client understands what the measure is asking g • Accommodate your language and explanation to the client Question 4 What do you do when a child or adolescent balks at completing (or refuses to complete) one of the measures? 6
  7. 7. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 Question 4 Summary What do you do when a child or adolescent balks at completing (or refuses to complete) one of the measures? • Take steps to ensure the completion of the measures • Accept the client’s response while “gently nudging” him/her to “help you” if possible • Accommodate your language and explanation to the client • Never jeopardize the alliance Question 5 What do you do when a young person says “I don’t know” or gives minimal information when asked to explain their mark/rating on a measure? 7
  8. 8. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 Question 5 Summary What do you do when a young person says “I don’t know” or gives minimal information when asked to explain the measure? • “Gentle nudging” without jeopardizing the alliance Question 6 What do you do when the young person’s ratings are way g different/higher than their teachers’ or parents’ ratings? 8
  9. 9. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 Question 6 Summary What do you do when the young person’s ratings are way different/higher than their teachers’ g or parents’ ratings? • Expect it • Discuss it Question 7 How can I obtain parents’ and teachers’ feedback when it’s hard to meet with p them in person? 9
  10. 10. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 Question 7 Summary How can I obtain parents’ and teachers’ feedback when it’s hard to meet with them in person? p • Use the oral administration of the ORS • Accommodate to their situation the best you can Question 8 What do you do when the child or adolescent always marks 10’s on the SRS/CSRS? 10
  11. 11. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 Question 8 Summary What do you do when the child or adolescent always marks 10’s on the SRS/CSRS? • Alliance ratings tend to be high • Explain that you REALLY want their honest opinion Closing Stories and Points • Empowers the two most important elements of effective services—the client and the alliance • Gives those closest to the school problem (and solution) a respected voice • G b th attention of students whose voices are Grabs the tt ti f t d t h i often ignored or minimized (and reduces their dropout rate) • Provides a direct, practical way of evaluating programs and services on an ongoing/formative basis (easy to interpret—no smokescreens) • Ensures for accountable, responsive, consumerdriven (vs. product-driven) services • Excellent face validity with consumers (makes sense) • Closing Stories: Aquarium & Molly (Moral of the stories and PCOMS Client knows best 11
  12. 12. https://heartandsoulofchange.com January 23, 2014 THANK YOU! A Heart & Soul of Change Project Webinar Presenter: John J. Murphy, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology & Counseling, University of Central Arkansas; Heart & Soul of Change Project Partner for Children, Adolescents, Adolescents & Schools JMurphy@uca.edu www.drjohnmurphy.com 12

×