Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

NorwayCoupleProjectHandouts

260

Published on

These handout slides are from the third of the series “Using PCOMS with Couples, Youth, and Families.” In this presentation, The Norway Couple Project: Lessons Learned, University of Rhode Island …

These handout slides are from the third of the series “Using PCOMS with Couples, Youth, and Families.” In this presentation, The Norway Couple Project: Lessons Learned, University of Rhode Island professor and Project Leader Dr. Jacqueline Sparks highlights the lessons learned from the five published studies spawned by the Norway Feedback Trial and covers the use of PCOMS with couples.

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
260
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. https://heartandsoulofchange.com October, 2013 Lessons Learned Jacqueline Sparks, Ph.D. University of Rhode Island jsparks@uri.edu The Trials P Practice Implications ti  I li ti  Implementing PCOMS  in Couple Work  jsparks@uri.edu 1
  • 2. https://heartandsoulofchange.com jsparks@uri.edu October, 2013 2
  • 3. https://heartandsoulofchange.com October, 2013  Largest RCT of  Couple Therapy   Random  assignment to  feedback or no  feedback groups Five previous trials had shown significant gains for  use of progress and/or alliance monitoring  (feedback) with individuals  Partners for Change Outcome Management  System (PCOMS), using brief measures  collaboratively with clients and continuously  assessing the alliance, had shown promising results  g , p g for individuals  (one RCT and one quasi‐ experimental).   jsparks@uri.edu Can these gains also be realized in couple  therapy? 3
  • 4. https://heartandsoulofchange.com October, 2013 Random assignment g  Same pool of  therapists; therapists  served as own controls  Variety of orientations;  disciplines  Were not “true  believers” in feedback.      jsparks@uri.edu Do outcomes for couples and therapists  receiving systematic feedback on progress  and the alliance differ from those not  receiving feedback at posttreatment and 6‐ month follow‐up If there is differential efficacy, is this confined  y p only to those couple determined to be “at  risk,” or all couples? What is the role of therapist variability in the  trial? Is the system effective in a routine setting? 4
  • 5. https://heartandsoulofchange.com October, 2013 Feedback clients achieved  nearly 4x the rate of reliable  and significant change  compared to TAU (40.8%  v.  10.8%); both in couple,  50.5% v. 22.6%.   Feedback superiority (2x)  maintained at 6 month  follow‐up.   Divorce and separation rates for feedback couples was  46.2% less than TAU couples     jsparks@uri.edu Significantly fewer at‐risk cases emerged in  Significantly fewer at risk cases emerged in  the feedback condition (74.5% in TAU vs.  54.4% in feedback group) Gains were for both at risk and not at risk The less effective therapists (those who had  the worst outcomes without feedback)  benefited more from feedback that the most  effective therapists. 5
  • 6. https://heartandsoulofchange.com October, 2013 Disentangling the Alliance‐Outcome Correlation Anker, Owen,  Duncan, & Sparks  (2010). The alliance in  couple therapy.  Journal of Consulting  and Clinical  Psychology, 78(5),  635‐645. Alliance Alli Alliance score at session 3 predicted outcome over and above the  effects of early symptom change...The alliance creates change  and is not just an artifact of it.  jsparks@uri.edu 6
  • 7. https://heartandsoulofchange.com   October, 2013 First session alliance scores were not significant  g predictors of outcome Alliances that started over the mean and  increased (called the high linear cluster) were  associated with significantly more couples  achieving reliable or clinically significant change: g y g g  77.1% of couples in the high linear cluster both  changed  compared with 45.5% of couples who started below  the mean and whose scores didn’t increase. jsparks@uri.edu 7
  • 8. https://heartandsoulofchange.com October, 2013  Responses fell out along two  dimensions—relationship and tasks  More favorable comments had to do  with the relationship  Neutrality valued    jsparks@uri.edu Wanted the therapist to give more advice Desired more structure to provide a safe  place for highly‐charged discussions.  8
  • 9. https://heartandsoulofchange.com October, 2013 Wished therapist had been more proactive in  arranging appointments, checking in between  sessions, and being flexible in scheduling  It in there: “. . . collaboration between patient and  therapist involves an agreed‐upon contract, which  takes into account some very concrete exchanges”  (Bordin, 1979, p. 254)  jsparks@uri.edu 9
  • 10. https://heartandsoulofchange.com  October, 2013 When both members of the couple wanted to improve the  relationship, the majority of them did (only about 8%  separated or divorced 6 months post therapy).    jsparks@uri.edu One member wanted to  improve the  relationship, partner  wanted clarification,  45% separated at 6  d months post therapy. When both sought  clarification, 56% had  separated at follow‐up. . . . initial feedback  about goals is critical to  ensure that the  therapist is on target  with strategies that are  a good fit for both  members of the couple’s  reasons for seeking  counseling.  10
  • 11. https://heartandsoulofchange.com   October, 2013 Couples in all three categories of goals realized  p g g significant reductions in distress pre to post,  surpassing the reliable change index on the  ORS. Therapy appeared to be  helpful regardless of goal,  helpful regardless of goal   although those with the  goal of improving the  relationship fared better.  Owen, J., Duncan, B. L., Reese, J., Anker, M. G., & Sparks, J. A.  (in press). Accounting for therapist variability in couple therapy:  What really matters? Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy.     jsparks@uri.edu Therapist effects accounted for 8% of the  variance.  Therapist’s gender or specific professional  discipline didn’t make a difference. Those who had more experience working with  couples accounted for 25% of the variance  attributable to therapists.  Therapist average alliance score, accounting  for 50% of that variance.   11
  • 12. https://heartandsoulofchange.com October, 2013 Use the measures! You significantly  enhance your chance of a positive  outcome by doing so.  Monitor the alliance throughout  py g g therapy. Ascending scores are a good  sign; don’t be discouraged if the first  session is bit low, but rejoice when it  improves.      jsparks@uri.edu Use the SRS to determine if your approach   y pp matches the goals for each member of a  couple, especially early on. If members of the couple or family have  different goals, negotiate a goal and an  approach both can agree on.  approach both can agree on   Even if goals are different for a couple and  one wants out or clarification while the other  doesn’t, couple therapy can be helpful. 12
  • 13. https://heartandsoulofchange.com October, 2013 Use the SRS to determine if your approach is a good fit  for the couple at hand. Expand your repertoire to provide  for the couple at hand  Expand your repertoire to provide  more structured and directive approaches to those who  want that.  Increase your couple  caseload hours over time  to enhance your  y effectiveness with this  modality (but in such a  way that you are learning  the lessons that couples  teach).     jsparks@uri.edu Attend to clients’ needs both during the  g session and between sessions, keeping in  touch and being flexible in meeting times and  scheduling. Use the SRS to expand your relational  repertoire and work on your alliance skills in  complex interpersonal situations. Remember   l  i l  i i  R b that your alliance abilities count for half (at  least) of any differences between you and  your colleagues.  13
  • 14. https://heartandsoulofchange.com  October, 2013 ORS – Same procedure as with individuals:  Provide rationale: Get  best outcome and their  voice stays central  Give guidance as needed  Discuss  scores—the  clinical cutoff  and  connect  to the reasons  for service Biggest difference is a bit more time and dealing with  the  “atmosphere” in the room.  jsparks@uri.edu 14
  • 15. https://heartandsoulofchange.com      jsparks@uri.edu Different scores are  concrete and visible,  allowing therapists to  inquire early on about  everyone’s unique  perceptions and  beliefs.   October, 2013 Therapists can validate discrepant scores that  persist, and still successfully work toward a positive  outcome (recall study in which even couples with  discrepant goals benefited from therapy). Window into discrepant goals d d f f Window into discrepant preferences for  therapy tasks Provides  transparency and  opportunity for open  discussion Aids with important  alliance balance in  couple work 15
  • 16. https://heartandsoulofchange.com jsparks@uri.edu October, 2013 16

×