DLA2011 Five Myths about e-Learning

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Presentation by Barry Dahl at Distance Learning Administrator's conference in Savannah. May 25, 2011.

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DLA2011 Five Myths about e-Learning

  1. 1. Five Distance Learning Myths Explored and Exploded<br />Barry Dahl<br />Excellence in e-Education<br />
  2. 2. Barry Dahl dot com<br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4. Online Courses and Developmental Education<br />Data from Lake Superior College 2009-2010 academic year<br />#1<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6. “Best Practices”<br />NCDE Director, Dr. Hunter Boylan<br />Keynote speech: “Best Practices in Developmental Education.”<br />During Q & A, he was asked to share examples of good practice in offering developmental courses via online delivery.<br />
  7. 7. His Response?<br />“There aren’t any!”<br />
  8. 8. He Continued<br />He went on to say that the completion rates (or success rates) in online developmental courses “are abysmal. Way below the rates for on-ground courses. ”<br />
  9. 9. Case Study – Lake Superior College<br />Developmental Math Sequence – 3 courses<br />First taught online during Fall 2002<br />As of Spring 2010, a total of 91 online sections have been taught.<br />MATH 0450 Pre-Algebra<br />MATH 0460 Algebra I<br />MATH 0470 Algebra II<br />
  10. 10. Case Study – Lake Superior College<br />Developmental Writing Sequence – 2 courses<br />First taught online during Spring 2004<br />As of Spring 2010, a total of 23 online sections have been taught.<br />ENGL 0450 Writing I<br />ENGL 0460 Writing II<br />
  11. 11. Case Study – Lake Superior College<br />Developmental Reading Sequence – 2 courses<br />First taught online during Spring 2005<br />As of Spring 2010, a total of 17 online sections have been taught.<br />READ 0460 Reading II<br />
  12. 12. AY 2010 Student Completion Results<br />510 students enrolled in online sections<br />2,226 students enrolled in on-ground sections<br />Course withdrawal rates were identical at 15.7% for both groups.<br />
  13. 13. Grades Earned<br />
  14. 14. Passing Grades in These Courses<br />
  15. 15. AY 2010 Results<br />More A’s were given in online courses: <br />25.1% online <br />21.3% on-ground<br />More F’s were given in on-ground courses:<br />17.5% on-ground <br />16.8% online<br />GPA in these courses: <br />2.37 for online <br />2.31 for on-ground.<br />
  16. 16. My Retort<br />Completion rates (or success rates) in online developmental courses “are no more abysmal than and NOT way below the rates for on-ground courses. ”<br />At least that is true for<br />Lake Superior College<br />
  17. 17. Discussion TimeOnline Courses and Developmental Education<br />
  18. 18. #2<br />QualityMatters™ should be the focal point of our online quality efforts.<br />
  19. 19. Through the use of rubrics and standards related to the quality of online courses (i.e. Quality Matters™), we are sufficiently addressing the questions about e-learning quality<br />Reality<br />Myth<br />
  20. 20. Learning<br />Quality<br />Concerns<br />Design<br />Teaching<br />QualityMatters is Sufficient<br /><ul><li>Um, no, it isn’t!!</li></ul>QualityMatters looks at the quality of course design.<br /><ul><li>That’s good, but it’s only one leg holding up the stool.</li></li></ul><li>Learning Level<br />Is High<br /> Learning Assessment<br />Teaching Level<br />Is High<br />Course Design<br />Meets Standards<br />QualityMatters®<br />Performance Eval<br />
  21. 21. Learning Level<br />Is Low<br /> Learning Assessment<br />Teaching Level<br />Is High<br />Course Design<br />Meets Standards<br />QualityMatters®<br />Performance Eval<br />
  22. 22. Learning Level<br />Is High<br /> Learning Assessment<br />Teaching Level<br />Is High<br />Course Design<br />Below Standard<br />QualityMatters®<br />Performance Eval<br />
  23. 23. Learning Level<br />Is Low<br /> Learning Assessment<br />Teaching Level<br />Is Low<br />Course Design<br />Meets Standards<br />QualityMatters®<br />Performance Eval<br />
  24. 24. Discussion TimeMoving Beyond QualityMatters™<br />
  25. 25. #3<br />Digital Natives and Non-Traditional Students<br />
  26. 26. Generations<br />
  27. 27. Digital Natives<br />
  28. 28. Net Generation<br />
  29. 29. Next Generation<br />
  30. 30. Nexters<br />
  31. 31. Texters<br />
  32. 32. Generation Y<br />
  33. 33. Generation Why<br />
  34. 34. Millennials<br />
  35. 35. Generation Now<br />
  36. 36. iGeneration<br />
  37. 37. Echo Boomers<br />
  38. 38. Google<br />Generation<br />
  39. 39. Nintendo<br />Generation<br />
  40. 40. Trophy<br />Generation<br />
  41. 41. Screenagers<br />
  42. 42. That’s Crazy Talk.<br />Let’s consolidate.<br />
  43. 43. Digital<br />Net-Gennials<br />
  44. 44. More crazy talk.<br />Let’s compare.<br />
  45. 45. Conflicting Cottage Industries<br />“Digital Net-Gennials” are loosely defined as being born from 1980 (or ‘82) to 2000. <br />So, many of this “group” are between 25 and 30 years old.<br />“Non-traditional” age students are usually defined as being 25 years and older.<br />
  46. 46. So, which is it?<br />
  47. 47. Treat them as <br />Digital Natives?<br />or as <br />Non-Trads?<br />
  48. 48. Discussion TimeDigital Natives and Non-Traditional Students<br />
  49. 49. #4<br />Sense of Communityfor Online Learners<br />
  50. 50. Online Community<br />Are you trying to build an online community for your e-campus?<br />
  51. 51. Why?<br />
  52. 52. Importance Scale - PSOL<br />PSOL – Importance Scores on 36 Items<br />Importance of sense of community<br />
  53. 53. Why don’t they care about community?<br />Because they’re already up to <br />their eyeballs in ….<br />Already established<br />communities<br />
  54. 54. Discussion TimeSense of Communityfor Online Learners<br />
  55. 55. #5<br />Online Student Satisfaction Surveys<br />
  56. 56. Option 1 - PSOL<br />
  57. 57. Why PSOL?<br />
  58. 58. 59<br />PSOL Basics<br />There are 72 questions that comprise the PSOL. Average completion time is 15 minutes.<br />NOTE: questions are answered on a 7-point Likert scale, where 7 is high.<br />
  59. 59. The Importance of Importance<br />
  60. 60. That’s all good,but…….<br />
  61. 61. Strengths/Challenges<br /><ul><li>Noel-Levitz identifies strengthsand challenges based on your data.
  62. 62. I call these “internal” strengths and challenges. They might not be a strength or a challenge when compared to others.</li></li></ul><li>Are online students, as a group, more satisfied than the on-campus students?<br />
  63. 63. 64<br />NOTE: SSI is the Noel-Levitz Survey for on-ground learners, PSOL is the Noel-Levitz survey for online learners.<br />
  64. 64. 65<br />NOTE: SSI is the Noel-Levitz Survey for on-ground learners, PSOL is the Noel-Levitz survey for online learners.<br />
  65. 65. What’s Missing?<br /><ul><li>Student tech usage rates
  66. 66. Student uses of non-campus technology
  67. 67. Computer skills assessment
  68. 68. Student success rates
  69. 69. Comparison between online and on-ground students (using same survey)</li></li></ul><li>Student Uses of e-Services<br />Online Library Services<br />Never used it; didn't know about it.<br />Never used it; but was aware of it.<br />Have used it a little; will use again.<br />Have used it a little; won’t use it again.<br />Have used it a lot; planning to continue the same.<br />Have used it a lot; planning to reduce usage.<br />
  70. 70. Great Expectations<br />
  71. 71. 2009 PSOL – Summary Statement<br />So far, how has your college experience met your expectations? <br />Overall score <br />5.0<br />
  72. 72. But seriously…<br />
  73. 73. Discussion TimeOnline Student Satisfaction Surveys<br />
  74. 74. Five Distance Learning Myths Explored and Exploded<br />Barry Dahl<br />Excellence in e-Education<br />

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