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2009 NACADA Annual Conference Presentation: Customer Service AND Educational Advising (Concurrent 179)
 

2009 NACADA Annual Conference Presentation: Customer Service AND Educational Advising (Concurrent 179)

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Educational Advising AND Customer Service ...

Educational Advising AND Customer Service
TD,AM
2009-10-02
11:30:00 AM - 12:30:00 AM
Convention Center- 210

Exhaustion happens. The wear and tear of investing in students and the struggles of difficult interactions can culminate in silent resignation. Advisors are inclined to abandon principled protocols in favor of survival; even our advising veterans resort to prescriptive solutions and avoid expending energy in student guidance and constructive challenge. Considering student and parent expectations alongside advisor safety and sanity, our interactive discussion will deconstruct the typical advising session. We will explore the balance and tension between learning-centered advising and quality customer service en route to policies and practices that simultaneously achieve institutional goals and benefit students. Goal: free advisors for what they do best . Engaging with and investing in student success.

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  • Expectations: Discuss student and parent expectations and the culture of customer service Setting the Stage: Discuss the importance of well-defined learning objectives, boundaries, and safety measuresCulture Club: Review the history of education and develop working definitions for participants’ current institutional culturesExpert Opinion: Consider current literature and tools on the topic
  • The developmental academic advising model Academic advising as teaching The importance of identifying learning outcomes for the advisor-advisee relationship Conflict between the academic advising relationship and student and parent expectations of customer service Customer service The focus of the customer service model is on the customer’s needs, expectations, and satisfaction. Customers are the focal point and the reason for the organization’s existence. Individuals cooperate with the customers, helping them to get what they need rather than dictating what they receive.
  • Expectations of an academic advising office – are these tenets of good customer service? The academic advising staff will be civil and professional Academic Advisors will be efficient and punctual Advisors will understand and effectively communicate university/college requirements, policies, and proceduresAdvisors will be accessible to students and maintain accurate records
  • Is the idea of customer service applicable in a higher ed.? Is the idea of customer service applicable in an academic advising setting?  In the early 1990s the idea of customer service in higher education correlated strongly to a push by colleges and universities to increase their recruitment, retention, and graduation of students. Due in part to increasing fiscal restraints and budget cuts it became more important for colleges to attract and retain students. Superimposing a customer service model onto higher ed, means that students are consumers of their education and that if their expectations regarding their educational experiences are not met than they may withdraw and go (with their money) somewhere else. Academic advising is often the lynchpin of a student’s educational experience and can either draw a student closer to the institution or be a large part of why they leave. Spicuzza, Frank J. “A Customer Service Approach to Advising: Theory and Application.” NACADA Journal 12 (2): 49-58. A customer service model cannot be directly applied to academic advising because a student’s/customer’s expectations are changeable and the model does not take include the relationship between the student and the institution of higher education and the shared expectations of learning and personal development. This is especially applicable to academic advising, because if advisors attempted to meet all their students’ expectations and keep them satisfied (as customers) they would change the type of learning and level of personal development required of individuals as college students.
  • “They know the way things go down and are no longer naïve about the workings of the world and the intentions of businesses and other organizations.”Peter Sheahan from “Generation Y: Thriving and Surviving with Generation Y at Work.”
  • “They know the way things go down and are no longer naïve about the workings of the world and the intentions of businesses and other organizations.”Peter Sheahan from “Generation Y: Thriving and Surviving with Generation Y at Work.”
  • Breaking down a typical advising sessionYou invite a student into your office. Where do they sit? Do you have a separate seating area around a table? Is the computer between you? How does the seating arrangement impact your advising session? You open the conversation. Typical opening questions – How are you today? What can I do to help you? What’s up? What’s your story? Which of these opening statements is most effective? How does asking certain questions like this set the stage for the advising session and whether the discussion will be developmental or prescriptive, a discussion or a speech? The student states his/her issues or questions
  • Refer back to information on effectiveness of different approaches with different groups from UCF.How do we provide developmental advising to students in difficult advising sessions? When an advising session gets complicated and student behavior creates a barrier to discussion, what do you do? Do we abandon the idea of developmental advising and utilize prescriptive techniques when addressing these types of challenges?
  • Person safety – much of the session has looked at how advisors can be “safe” to provide developmental advising and to work with students to ensure their success. However, sometimes these types of conflicts can also develop into situations where an advisor’s personal/physical safety is at risk. What structures or systems are in place in your office to deal with situations of potential physical violence? -Staff alerts/support -Emergency phone calls -Back-up? -Safety plan?

2009 NACADA Annual Conference Presentation: Customer Service AND Educational Advising (Concurrent 179) 2009 NACADA Annual Conference Presentation: Customer Service AND Educational Advising (Concurrent 179) Presentation Transcript

  • Educational Advising ANDCustomer Service2009 NACADA National ConventionFriday, October 10, 2009, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
    Tammy LoudVice President of Student ServicesDavenport University
    Joshua BarronAssociate Director University Advising CenterTexas Tech University
    © 2009 Barron, Loud, ©2007 Barron, Elias
  • Session Objectives
    Participants will have the opportunity to:
    Critically examine differences and similarities in customer service and developmental advising
    Learn about and practice communication methods that encourage student receptivity and empower student development
    Examine working boundaries in their current office environments and critique their usefulness in specific case study scenarios
    Learn about and discuss specific policies and procedures that further student and advisor safety
    Network with others
  • Session Outline
    Introductions
    Expectations, Expectations
    Culture Club
    Setting the Stage
    Case Studies
    Implications for Practice
  • Expectations, Expectations!
    Let’s talk about it …
    What do you think students really want in their relationship with the advisor?
    What factors influence a student’s satisfaction with the advising experience?
    What are the top three goals of an academic advisor during an initial appointment?
    What are the top three goals of a student during an initial appointment?
  • Expectations, Expectations!
    Let’s talk about it …
    The academic advising staff will be civil and professional
    Academic Advisors will be efficient and punctual
    Advisors will understand and effectively communicate university/college requirements, policies, and procedures
    Advisors will be accessible to students and maintain accurate records
    Should there be more?
    Do they expect more?
  • Culture Club
    Expected vs. Appropriate
    Review of Customer Service in Education
    Responsibility of the Academy for Learning
    Expected vs. Needed
    Prescriptive Model
    Developmental Model
    Praxis Model
    Expected vs. Beneficial
    Innovation
    Total Quality Management
  • Setting the STage
    Knowing the Audience
    Customer Service Basics
    Generational Generalities @
    History with Parents
    Coming of Age
    Treat Me How You’d Want to be Treated
    Streamlined and Efficient
    Timeline: Now.
    Implications of Parental Involvement
  • Case Studies
    #1: Just Do This For Me
    #2: Just Do This For Me Do-Over
    #3: I Pay Your Salary – Parent Side
    #4: I Pay Your Salary – Student Side
    #5: What Do You Mean I Am Not Going To Graduate? – How To Deliver Bad News
    #6: What Do You I Am Not Going To Graduate?– Threat Of Physical Violence
    #7: I Don’t Really Need Your Help
  • Case Studies
    3 Questions for Following Up:
    What was the most difficult piece of your situation/case study?
    How did you balance the needs of the student versus your goals as advisors?
    How did you get there?What was the process?
  • Implications for Practice
    Break it Down
    Advance Communications
    Advising Appointments
    Accessibility/Waiting
    Seating
    Openers
    Issues
    Solutions
    Referrals
    Documentation
    Follow-Up
  • Implications for Practice
    When Things Get Sticky
    Uninterested
    Unprepared
    Underprepared
    Difficult
  • Implications for Practice
    A Word on Safety
    Staff alerts/support
    Emergency phone calls
    Back-up?
    Safety plan?
  • Educational AdvisingANDCustomer Service
    Session Appendix
  • Appendix: References(1 of 2)
    Allen, Mike, Witt, Paul L. & Wheeless, Lawrence R. (2006). The Role of Teacher Immediacy as a Motivational Factor in Student Learning: Using Meta-Analysis to Test a Causal Model. Communication Education, 55 (1), 0363-4523. Retrieved September 21, 2007, from http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/03634520500343368
    Continuous Quality Improvement in Higher Education, by Robert V. Hogg; Mary C. HoggInternational Statistical Review / Revue Internationale de Statistique © 1995 International Statistical Institute (ISI). Retrieved online September 20, 2007, from http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0306-7734%28199504%2963%3A1%3C35%3ACQIIHE%3E2.0.CO%3B2-7
    Evans, N.J, Forney, D.S. & Guido-DiBrito, F. (1998). Student development in college: Theory, practice, and research. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
    Howe, N. & Strauss, W. (2000). Millennials rising: The next great generation. New York : Vintage Books.
    http://www.deloitte.com/dtt/cda/doc/content/us_consulting_millennialfactsheet_080606.pdf
    http://www.psu.edu/dus/mentor/foru0211.htm
    Keeling, S. (2003). Advising the millennial generation. NACADA Journal, 23 (1&2), 30-36.
    Keppler, K., Mullendore, R. H., & Carey, A. (2005). Partnering with the parents of today’s college students . Washington , DC : NASPA.
    Montano, C., Hunt, M., Boudreaux, L. “Improving the quality of student advising in higher education – A case study.” Total Quality Management & Business Excellence; Dec2005, Vol. 16 Issue 10, p1103-1125. Retrieved on September 20, 2007, from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip,cookie,url,uid&db=bth&AN=19019698&loginpage=Login.asp&site=ehost-live
  • Appendix: References(2 of 2)
    Mottarella, K., Fritzsche, B., & Cerabino, K. (2004). “What do Students Want in Advising? A Policy Capturing Study.” NACADA Journal v. 24, no. 49 (48-61). Retrieved online September 20, 2007, from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/Research_Related/blue.pdf
    Raisman, N. (2002). Embrace the oxymoron: Customer service in higher education. Publisher: Year.
    Reynolds, M. (2004). “Faculty Advising in a Learner-Center Environment: A Small College Perspective.” Academic Advising Today. Volume 27, Number 2. NACADA. Retrieved online September 20, 2007, from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/AAT/NW27_2.htm
    Rozell, E., Pettijohn, C., Parker, R. S. (2004). “Customer-Oriented Selling: Exploring the Roles of Emotional Intelligence and Organizational Commitment.” Psychology & Marketing, Jun2004, Vol. 21 Issue 6, p405-424.
    Shields, Peggy. (1995). “Service Quality And Academic Advising: Practicing What We Preach.” Retrieved online September 20, 2007, from http://www.sbaer.uca.edu/research/swma/1995/pdf/22.pdf
    Smith, Joshua. (2002). “First-Year Student Perceptions of Academic Advisement: A Qualitative Study and Reality Check” NACADA Journal v. 22, no. 2 (29-49). Retrieved online September 20, 2007, from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/Research_Related/red.pdf
    Spicuzza, Frank J. “A Customer Service Approach to Advising: Theory and Application.” NACADA Journal 12 (2): 49-58.
    Strauss, W., & Howe, N. (1991). Generations: The history of America’s future, 1584 to 2069. New York: Quill/William/Morrow.
    Upcraft, M.L., Gardner, J.N., & Barefoot, B.O. (2005). ”Challenging & supporting the first-year student: A handbook for improving the first year of college.” San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
     
  • Appendix: Session Abstract
    Exhaustion happens. The wear and tear of investing in students and the struggles of difficult interactions can culminate in silent resignation. Advisors are inclined to abandon principled protocols in favor of survival; even our advising veterans resort to prescriptive solutions and avoid expending energy in student guidance and constructive challenge. Considering student and parent expectations alongside advisor safety and sanity, our interactive discussion will deconstruct the typical advising session. We will explore the balance and tension between learning-centered advising and quality customer service en route to policies and practices that simultaneously achieve institutional goals and benefit students. Goal: free advisors for what they do best ... engaging with and investing in student success.
  • Appendix: Session Description (1 of 3)
    Brief Outline/Description
    It is a controversial topic in higher education, and we reject that the two are mutually exclusive. Whether poor customer service comes from exhaustion or indifference, its ultimate end is a failure to provide the ideal environment for real student learning.  If academic advising in higher education is to be about these things, then customer service is not a necessary evil; it may even be a necessary good.
  • Appendix: Session Description (2 of 3)
    For example, consider the realities of our advisors' responsibilities. Especially when burdened by many relationships, confrontation and conflict are inevitable in every quality relationship. As the field of academic advising further values and invests in substantive and meaningful engagement with students, difficult conversations are bound to happen.Administrators are doubly responsible for supporting theirteam members and the students they serve. Advisors charged with building bridges to facilitate student persistence are also urged to encourage and exhort students to achieve their potential. Unfortunately for both groups, these sometimes conflicting responsibilities often result in confusion, frustration, and error.
  • Appendix: Session Description (3of 3)
    This presentation will consider the ethical and legal responsibilities of advisors, and balance the pressures of achieving learning outcomes in an environment where many students are resistant to learning. The presentation will briefly consider the important component of parental over/under-involvement, and will explore current literature and practice in management strategies and techniques. An interactive Q&A session will highlight our time together through a facilitated participant discussion of personal insights, valuable resources, and creative ideas.
    Session Web Site - www.advising.ttu.edu/nacada2009